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BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Left to Right - James R. Engel, Edward B. Rauscher 

Patrick J. McNally, James W. Foley, Chair 

Harry Lampropoulos 



Cover photo: 



Newly purchased 1500 GPM Stainless Steel 
Rescue Pumper. The Initial Attack Pumper 
also purchased in 2003 did not arrive in time 
to be photographed. 

Photo by Chief Henry Michalski 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

2003 





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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 3 

April 7 , 2003 Annual Town Meeting 7 

October 20, 2003 Special Town Meeting 42 

Board of Selectmen 85 

Town Manager 8 6 

Department of Public Safety 90 

Police Department 90 

Fire Department 91 

Animal Control 93 

Harbors 94 

Shellfish 95 

Emergency Management 96 

Department of Public Works 98 

Public Works Divisions 98 

Facilities Department 101 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 103 

Department of Code Enforcement 104 

Building Department 104 

Health Department 105 

Zoning Board of Appeals 106 

Department of Planning and Development 107 

Planning Board 110 

Conservation Commission 112 

Historical Commission 114 

Housing Partnership 116 

Department of Human Services 117 

Recreation Department 117 

Youth Services 119 

Council on Aging 120 

Veterans Services 123 

Department of Utilities 125 

Electric Department 125 

Water Division 126 

Wastewater Treatment 128 

Finance Directorate 129 

Accounting Office 129 

Treasurer/Collector 130 

Assessors Office 130 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 

Town Clerk 131 

Elections and Registrations 134 

MIS Department 136 

Purchasing/Budget/Risk Management . 136 

Ipswich Public Library 138 

School Department 141 

Ipswich Housing Authority 156 

Ipswich Cultural Council 157 

Open Space Committee 157 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 158 

Ipswich Bay Circuit Committee 159 

Waterways Advisory Committee 160 

Trust Fund Commission 161 

Town of Ipswich Americans With Disabilities Act 162 

Financial Statements-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2003 ... 164 



2004-2005 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



E BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James Engel,Ch 2004 E2 
Edward Rauscher 2005 
Harry Lampropoulos 2 004 
Patrick McNally 2005 
James Foley 2003 03 

E SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan Arsenault/Ch 2004 

Edmund Traverso 2005 S 

Norman Sheppard 2005 

Hugh 0' Flynn 2006 

Diane Ross 2006 

Jeffrey Loeb 2004 

Barry Hopping 2005 E 
Ray Morley, Whittier Rep 

E CONSTABLE 

Peter Dziadose 2003 

E TOWN MODERATOR 

A. James Grimes 2004 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Elected at Town Meeting 
Daniel Clasby ~ 2005 
Robert White 2006 
George Markos, Ch 2004 
Appointed by Moderator 
Jamie Fay 2 005 

William Craft 2006 
Clark Ziegler 2004 
Appointed by Selectmen 
John Bruni 2 005 

Diane Linehan 2006 
Raymond Morley 2004 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Kenneth Blades 2008 

Tone Kenney 2005 

Robert Como 2 00 6 

Sara O'Connor 2004 
State Rep. (vacant) 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



S TOWN MANAGER M 

George E. Howe 
SI FINANCE DIR./TOWN ACCT. 

Rita Negri Ml 

SI UTILITIES DEPT. DIRECTOR 

Tim Henry Ml 

SI TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Kevin A. Merz Ml 

Ml ELECTRIC DEPT. MANAGER 

Raymond Shockey Ml 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank Ragonese Ml 

Ml CODE INFORCEMENT 

BUILDING INSPECTOR M 

James Sperber 

Eric Colville, Asst. M 
Ml DIRECTOR OF PLANNING 

TOWN PLANNER M 

Glenn Gibbs 



HARBORMASTER 

Charles Surpitski 

Charles Schwartz, Deputy 

HEALTH AGENT 

Colleen Fermon 

LIBRARIAN 

Victor Dyer 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth Dorman 

TOWN CLERK 

Frances Richards 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Robert Gravino 

FIRE CHIEF 

Henry Michalski 

CEMETERIES /PARKS DEPT. 

James Graffum 

COUNCIL ON AGING DIRECT. 

Diane Mitchell 



Ml DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC 



Ml 



SAFETY, POLICE CHIEF 

Charles Surpitski 
PARKING CLERK 

Susan LeMieux 



M SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Philip Kent 
7 SUPERINTEND ' T 
Richard Korb 



OF SCHOOLS 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERIES AND PARKS 
COMMISSION 

Arthur Sotis 2003 
Nicholas Markos 2005 
Theodore LeMieux 2 004 

M CIVIL DEFENSE /EMERGENCY 
MANAGEMENT 
Charles Cooper 2004 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 2004 
Joseph Carlin 2004 
Robert Waldner 2004 

M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
David Pancoast, Agent 
Glenn Wood 2005 

Ed Dick 2005 

David Standley 2006 
Jennifer Hughes 2006 
Mary Capkanis 2004 
Ann McMenemy 2004 
Vacant 
Lillian North (Assoc.) 

S FAIR HOUSING 

George Howe 2004 
Sara O'Connor 2004 
Tone Kenney 2004 

S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Elizabeth Nelson 2005 
Cheryl Ferris 2005 
Richard Kallman 2004 
Carol Emerson-Owen 2006 
Stephen Markos 2004 
Cynthia Burns 2004 
Carol Poirier 2006 



M MAPC REPRESENTATIVE 

Vacant 2004 



S IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Elizabeth Loudon 2005 
Coco McCabe 2005 

Kirki Thompson 2 08 
Penny Traney 2008 
Thorpe Feidt 2004 
Kamora Herrington 2009 
Michelle Shibley-McGrath' 09 
Dorothy Laurence 2007 
Chris DeStefano 2005 
Priscilla Herrington 2007 

S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Robert Weatherall 2005 
Lawrence Pszenny 2005 
Marie Schudder 2005 
George Gray 2006 
Judith Rusin 2006 
Philip Kuhn 2 004 
William Thoen 2004 
Marion Frost 2004 
Nancy Thompson 2 00 6 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSION 
Edward Michon 2005 
Jean Emerson 2006 
Robert Weatherall 2004 

S GOVERNMENT STUDY COM. 
Antonia Poltak 2004 
Lisa Cashman-LeGere 2004 
Robert Wicks 2004 
Rosalie Perkins 2004 
Charles McShane 2004 

M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Walter Pojasek 2006 
John Moss, Ch 2005 
Peter Lampropoulos 2006 
June Gahan 2006 

Marjorie Robie 2004 
Matthew Cummings 2004 



M 



M 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Orville Giddings, Sr . 2005 
Robert Stone 2006 
Philip Grenier 2004 
SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION-CONT 



Wilma Gooby 



2005 



Wayne Castonguay 


2004 


David Swicker 


2004 


John Pelletier 


2004 


Evan Parker 


2004 


Michael Lambros, Ch 


2004 


Brenda Turner 


2004 


Frank Michon 


2004 


Joseph Kmiec 


2004 


Anthony Murawski 


2004 


BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Frank Ragonese 


2005 


John Moberger 


2006 


Karen Rassias 


2005 


WATERWAYS ADVISORY 


COM. 


Ken Spellman,Ch 


2006 


Leticia Dort 


2006 


David Smith 


2004 


Ronald Cameron 


2005 


John Wigglesworth 


2004 


Elton McCausland 


2004 


Evan Parker 


2005 


PLANNING BOARD 




Charles Allen 


2007 


Robert Weatherall 


2005 


Michael Ryan 


2006 


Joshua Massey 


2004 


David Santomenna 


2008 



Timothy Purinton 
Associate 



2005 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Dana Jordan 200? 

Roger LeBlanc 200 

Robert Bodwell 200? 

Kevin Lombard 2007 

Robert Gambale 2008 

Tim Perkins (Alt.) 2004 

•(Alt.) 200 



03 HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COM. 

Vivian Endicott 2004 

Theresa Stephens 2004 

Peg Burr 2004 

William Thoen 2004 

Stephanie Gaskins 2004 

Margaret Broekel 2004 

Ed Sukach 2004 

James Lahar 2 004 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

Carl Hiltunen 2005 



M 



M 



M 



Spencer Amesbury,MD 2006 
Susan Hubbard 2004 
RECREATION 

Jane Schaller 2005 
Bruce Bryant 2006 
Kerrie Bates 2006 
Linda Murphy 2 004 
Jennifer Wile 2004 
Michael Wolnik 2004 
COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL 
Michael Schaff 2004 
Ingrid Miles 2004 
SANDY POINT ADVISORY 
Joseph Parks 2004 
Vacant 

IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT 
Lawrence Eliot 2004 
Mary Cunningham 2004 
James Clark 2004 
Patrick Glennon 2004 
Norman Marsh 2004 
Barbara Ostberg 2004 
Ralph Williams 2004 
Linda Coan 2004 

INDUSTRIAL DEVEL. FINANCE 
James Lahar 2004 
George Howe 2006 
SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COM. 
Winthrop Snow, Jr. 2004 
Charles Vose 2004 
ACTION, INC. 

Tone Kenney 2004 
Charlotte Dodge 2004 



M 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Ralph Williams 2004 
Lawrence Eliot 2004 
Carl Nylen 2004 

Glenn Hazelton,Ch 2004 
Ruth Sherwood 2 004 
David Standley 2004 
Carolyn Britt 2004 
CABLE TELEVISION ADVIS. 
George Howe 2004 
Arthur Savage 2004 
Stephen Harris 2004 
MOSQUITO CONTROL ADVIS. 



Daniel Deren 


2004 




Lisa Galanis 


2004 




Ian Forman 


2004 




Reta Pelletier 


2004 




Ed Ruta 


2004 


E 


Ernest Brockelbank 


2004 


S 


Ann Wallace 


2004 




Robert Gambale 


2004 


M 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 






Michael Schaaf 


2004 





James Warner 


2004 


1 


Donald Gill 


2004 




Donald Greenough 


2004 


2 


Edward Dick 


2004 


3 


Karen Wallen 


2004 


4 


Jay Gallagher 


2004 


5 
6 



WENDEL STEWARDSHIP COM. 

Jennifer Hughes, Ch.2004 
Carolyn Britt 2004 
Tracie Hines 2004 
Richard Communale 2004 
Betsy Kohl 2004 

Elise Zoli 2004 

Jonathan Cosco 2004 
Gail Yeo 2004 

Peter Pinciaro 2004 
Harry Lampropoulos 2004 
Scott Carpenter 2004 
Barbara Ostberg 2004 
Robert Gravino 2004 
James Graff urn (Alt) 
Wayne Castonguay (Alt) 

-- Elected 

= Appointed by Board of 

Selectmen 
: Appointed by Town 

Manager 
= Other 
; Supervised by Town 

Manager 
: Elected at Town Meeting 
= Appointed by Moderator 
= General Laws 
= 1976 STM, Article II 
= Confirmed by Board of 

Selectmen 
7 = Appointed by School 

Committee 



2 003 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the Performing 
Arts Center of the IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL/ IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, 
134 High Street in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE SEVENTH OF 
APRIL, 2003, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to 
act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the 3 7 th Annual Town Meeting to 
order at 7:40 p.m. with more than 228 voters present. The 
auditorium, which officially seats 691, was packed; yet only 473 
voters were checked in by 9:15 p.m. Richard Korb, 
Superintendent of Schools, led the Pledge of Allegiance to the 
Flag with thoughts and prayers for our armed forces fighting in 
Iraq. Superintendent Korb recognized two members retiring from 
the School Committee: Debbie Henry with six years of service 
and Margot Sherwood with twenty- five years of service. Finance 
Committee Chairman George Markos recognized two members retiring 
from the Finance Committee: Mary Harrington and Joni Soffron- 
Jarrett, both with nine years of service. Selectman James Engel 
also expressed his thanks and appreciation to Joni for her 
service to the town as the Selectman's appointment to the 
Finance Committee. It was moved, seconded and so voted to admit 
non-voters . Moderator Grimes informed the voters about town 
meeting procedures and announced the meeting was being broadcast 
live on Cable TV. Mr. Grimes also read a paragraph from the 
Moderator's handbook (Town Meeting Time) on the aspirations 
behind the town meeting conception of democracy. Tellers 
appointed by the Moderator were: Tim Perkins, Toni Poltack and 
Mary "Sissy" Ffolliott. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige 
was Town Counsel . 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to fix the salary and 
compensation of all elected Town Officers; (2) to choose the 
following officers, viz: Constable for three [3] years; 
Moderator for one [1] year; one [1] Selectman for three [3] 
years; two [2] members of the School Committee for three [3] 
years; and one [1] member of the Housing Authority for five [5] 
years; the above officers, and the three ballot referendum 



questions which are printed au rhe end of this warrant, to be 
voted on one ballot at the YMCA Hall, County Road, on Tuesday, 
April 15, 2 003; the polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and shall 
close at 8:00 p.m.; (3) to act on the transfer of any surplus 
funds in the Electric Division, Department of Utilities; and (4) 
to rescind the remaining balance of authorized but un-issued 
debt: Article 2 of the April 02, 2 001, Annual Town Meeting 
(renovations design services for the Doyon and Winthrop 
Elementary Schools) ; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that Town vote: (1) to fix the 
salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers as 
presented in the town and school operating budgets; (2) to 
choose the following officers, viz: Constable for three [3] 
years; Moderator for one [1] year; one [1] Selectman for three 
[3] years; and two [2] members of the School Committee for three 
[3] years; the above officers and three ballot referendum 
questions to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 110 
County Road, on TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 2 003; the polls shall open at 
10:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 p.m.; (3) to transfer 
$23 0,952 from surplus funds in the Electric Division; and (4) to 
rescind the remaining balance of authorized but un-issued debt: 
$196,000 under Article 20 of the April 02, 2001, Annual Town 
Meeting (renovations design services for the Doyon and Winthrop 
Elementary Schools). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended . 

Selectmen Edward Rauscher and Jam.es Engel and Finance Committee 
members Clark Zeigler and Jamie Fay answered qaestions from 
Walter Pojasek and Edward Sklarz . The question was moved, 
seconded and so voted. The main motion carried by -unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote, under the provisions of Chapter 
433 of the General Laws of Massachusetts, to adopt orders under 
Section 10(a) thereof, proposing the following amendments to the 
Town Charter, subject to the approval of the Attorney General 
pursuant to Section 10(c) thereof, ~o be submitted to the voters 
in accordance with Section 11 thereof at that part of the next 
Annual Town Meeting devoted to balloting in 2003: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter 



(Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966), "SECTION 28. Annual 
Budget." by adding the following sentences to the end of 
said section: 

"Between May 15 and July 15 of each year, in closing the 
fiscal year, the Town Manager, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee, may transfer 
funds between departments and categories appropriated 
within the municipal operating budget for the year then 
ending; said actions may be taken without further town 
meeting approval, provided the total budget is not 
increased, and provided further that the aggregate total of 
funds transferred pursuant to the provisions of this 
Section shall not exceed two percent (2.0%) of the total 
municipal operating budget for the year then ending."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
Board of Selectmen and Town Manager) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote under the 
provisions of Chapter 43B of the General Laws of Massachusetts, 
to adopt orders under Section 10(a) thereof, proposing the 
following amendment to the Town Charter, subject to the approval 
of the Attorney General pursuant to Section 10(c) thereof, to be 
submitted to the voters in accordance with Section 11 thereof at 
that part of the next Annual Town Meeting devoted to balloting 
in 2003: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter 
(Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966), "SECTION 28. Annual 
Budget . " by adding the following sentences to the end of 
said section: 

"Between May 15 and July 15 of each year, in closing 
the fiscal year the Town Manager, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee, may 
transfer funds between departments and categories 
appropriated within the municipal operating budget for 
the year then ending; said actions may be taken 
without further town meeting approval, provided the 
total budget is not increased, and provided further 
that the aggregate total of funds transferred pursuant 
to the provisions of this Section shall not exceed two 
percent (2.0%) of the total municipal operating budget 
for the year then ending . " 
Seconded. 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 * FY2004 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



003 SELECTMEN: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

005 TOWN MANAGER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Labor Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

007 LEGAL: 

Town Counsel-Litigation 
Town Counsel Expenses 
Total 

009 MODERATOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

011 FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



$5,640 


$5,990 


$6,000 


$6,320 


7,161 


8,138 


10,897 


10,427 














12,801 


14,128 


16,897 


16,747 


134,067 


139,605 


139,605 


144,261 


12,746 


12,125 


11,365 


15,086 


27,498 


17,775 


28,000 


26,000 














174,311 


169,505 


178,970 


185,347 





77,767 


52,000 


52,000 


58,618 











58,618 


77,767 


52,000 


52,000 


200 


200 


200 


200 














200 


200 


200 


200 


1,918 


1,999 


2,352 


2.352 


4,692 


5,027 


6.150 


6,150 


6,610 


7,026 


8.502 


8,502 



252,540 



268,626 



256,569 



262,796 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



17,970 

12,745 



30,715 



12,040 

8,523 



20,563 



18,498 

10,015 



28,513 



16.006 

9.965 



25.971 



025 ACCOUNTANT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



124,164 

6,217 



130,381 



134,482 
5,311 


139,793 



135,876 

4,985 



140,861 



139,512 

6,487 



145,999 



10 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 * FY2004 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



026 MANAGEMENT INFO. SYSTEMS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay . 
Total 

029 ASSESSORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

033 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

035 PURCHASING & BUDGET 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

039 TOWN CLERK: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 



46,930 


52,320 


52,320 


53,890 


68,566 


54,693 


44,137 


29,880 














115,496 


107,013 


96,457 


83,770 


136,235 


144,529 


146,351 


148,253 





4,700 


4,000 


4,000 


9,919 


8,669 


16,180 


12,132 


3,395 


30,218 








149,549 


188,116 


166,531 


164,385 


133,303 


147,373 


150,949 


155,102 


30,989 


16,922 


26,389 


21,450 














164,292 


164,295 


177,338 


176,552 


32,613 


34,020 


35,841 


36,069 


6,725 


4,811 


5,010 


5,035 














39,338 


38,831 


40,851 


41,104 


73,061 


78,754 


79,864 


82,571 


8,046 


8,220 


7,535 


5,530 





4,300 








81,107 


91,274 


87,399 


88,101 



710,878 



749,885 



737,950 



725,882 



063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

064 PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTS: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



88,928 


95,819 


99,195 


93,058 


9,857 


5,781 


6,775 


6,855 





3,948 








98,785 


105,548 


105,970 


99,913 








500 


500 


2,833 


7,244 


6,724 


7,401 


35,000 











37,833 


7,244 


7,224 


7,901 



11 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



065 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

066 CONSERVATION-COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT 

PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT 



FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 * 


FY2004 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPROP. 


RECOMMEND 



3,564 


3,564 



350 


350 



2,940 


2,940 



2,940 


2,940 


48,368 

2,428 



50,796 


54,725 

2,319 



57,044 


55,787 

2,795 



58,582 


57,951 

2,730 



60,681 



190,978 



170,186 



174,716 



171,435 



101 POLICE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Ambulance Contract 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

102 HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

103 FIRE: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

112 SHELLFISH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



1,501,653 


1,663,394 


1,737,302 


1,767,704 


121,177 


103,208 


103,310 


108,173 


144,861 


146,378 


352,189 


347,000 


156,400 


87,491 





17,750 


1,924,091 


2,000,471 


2,192,801 


2,240,627 


10,522 


10,504 


10,902 


11,011 


13,633 


10,270 


10,791 


11,571 














24,155 


20,774 


21,693 


22,582 


1,034,342 


1,072,902 


1,071,926 


1,078,258 


121,182 


93,787 


77,148 


78,320 


48,868 


9,158 








1,204,392 


1,175,847 


1,149,074 


1,156,578 


37,730 


40,944 


41,544 


42,648 


4,264 


4,945 


4,241 


4,129 














41,994 


45,889 


45,785 


46,777 



12 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



114 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

116 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY DEPT. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 * 


FY2004 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPROP. 


RECOMMEND 


3,503 


3,679 


6,212 


6,277 


2,347 


1,673 


2,346 


2,070 














5,850 


5,352 


8,558 


8,347 


35,877 


38,326 


43,607 


44,834 


9,109 


5,173 


4,802 


6,247 














44,986 


43,499 


48,409 


51,081 



3,245,468 3,291,832 3,466,320 



3,525,992 



301 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

302 GIS DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

303 HIGHWAY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

305 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Expenses 



90,923 

4,342 



95,265 


103,151 

3,054 



106,205 


108,072 

6,708 



114,780 


, 120,623 

6,626 

1,000 

128,249 


























300,008 
175,595 
316,260 
149,765 
941,628 


272,665 
130,387 
295,161 
134,655 
832,868 


299,110 
176,313 
316,260 
20,000 
811,683 


291,351 
173,537 
302,798 

767,686 


80,415 

17,104 



97,519 


77,019 

11,863 

17,547 

106,429 


82,492 

20,053 



102,545 


82,988 

20,074 



103,062 



279,500 



125,467 



132,564 



132,564 



13 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



309 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

405 SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

407 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

408 BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 



FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 * 


FY2004 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPROP. 


RECOMMEND 


42,917 

48,826 

12,500 

104,243 


42,803 

49,246 

3,100 

95,149 


45,094 

46,344 



91,438 


45,380 

43,759 



89,139 


670,488 

220 



670,708 



694,872 


694,872 



732,891 


732,891 



784,855 


784,855 


36,700 

7,066 



43,766 


36,496 

11,188 



47,684 


37,014 

14,080 



51,094 


11,774 

8,466 



20,240 


31,834 

39,097 



70,931 


31,329 

20,354 



51,683 


33,438 
26,155 
15,000 
74,593 


33,709 

22,106 



55,815 








79,634 

83,242 

2,950 

165,826 


127,394 

193,000 



320,394 


137,095 

193,720 



330,815 



410 CEMETERIES, PARKS & BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 

Salaries & Wages 252,779 261,207 282,002 295,762 

Expenses 41,701 35,206 36,319 32,086 

Road Treatment 

Capital Outlay 12,189 7,868 12,600 6,000 

Total 306,669 304,281 330,921 333,848 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS DEPT. 



2,610,229 2,530,464 2,762,903 



2,746,273 



14 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 * FY2004 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 

CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENT 



490 BUILDING INSPECTION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

061 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

501 HEALTH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

502 HEALTH CONTRACTS: 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Total 

TOTAL CODE ENFORCEMENT 

HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



95,141 

5,993 



101,134 


105,473 

5,828 



111,301 


107,374 

5,443 



112,817 


107,744 

5,927 



113,671 


16,257 

2,850 



19,107 


17,323 

2,139 



19,462 


17,388 

2,710 



20,098 


17,978 

2,912 



20,890 


62,182 

30,815 



92,997 


69,249 

32,216 



101,465 


79,299 

35,953 



115,252 


82,911 

42,930 



125,841 


234,413 

3,421 

237,834 


235,159 

2,955 

238,114 


11,063 

4,500 

15,563 


11,063 

3,500 

14,563 



451,072 



470,342 



263,730 



274,965 



520 


RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 












Salaries & Wages 


98,203 


111,928 


123,178 


109,917 




Expenses 


24,851 


20,382 


24,612 


18,384 




Capital Outlay 
















Total 


123,054 


132,310 


147,790 


128,301 


531 


COUNCIL ON AGING: 












Salaries & Wages 


50,567 


64,579 


70,116 


78,729 




Expenses 


25,907 


12,436 


9,634 


10,384 




Capital Outlay 
















Total 


76,474 


77,015 


79,750 


89,113 


551 


VETERANS' BENEFITS: 












Expenses 


28,519 


22,890 


29,000 


28,000 




Total 


28,519 


22,890 


29,000 


28,000 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES DEP'T. 



228,047 



232,215 



256,540 



245,414 



15 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 * FY2004 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 

LIBRARY 

601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 287,791 307,277 300,969 305,985 

Expenses 132,882 131,422 109,925 112,510 

Capital Outlay 22,899 9,112 0_ 

TOTAL LIBRARY DEPT 443,572 447,811 410,894 418,495 

UNCLASSIFIED 

013 RESERVE FUND:(Transfers dispersed into appropriate budgets in prior years) 

76,000 70,000 

071 BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 

County Retirement System 

Health & Life 

Medicare 

Consolidated Benefits 792,917 997,763 1,079,970 1,100,763 

TOTAL BENEFITS 792,917 997,763 1,079,970 1,100,763 

081 INSURANCE: 133,102 130,482 185,583 245,685 

091 OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT: 

Wages 6,356 6,506 3,375 3,375 

Expenses 140,559 86,324 93,020 102,800 

091 SALARY TRANSFER ACCOUNT: ** 51,393 35,000 

701 DEBT SERVICE: 

Payment of Long Term Interest 136,921 287,916 466,568 437,135 

Payment of Long Term Principal 319,000 315,000 768,000 665,000 

Payment of Short Term Principal 43,769 

Interest on Antic. Notes; Debt Issuance Fees 15,034 131,578 169,770 171,265 

Total 470,955 734,494 1,404,338 1,317,169 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 1,543,889 1,955,569 2,893,679 2,874,792 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET:"* $9,676,673 $10,116,930 $11,223,301 $11,246,044 

* Note: FY2003 reflects Reserve Fund transfers through November 30,2002. 
** Represents allowance for salary/wage increases; appropriations approved in 
prior years have been dispersed into individual department budgets. 



16 



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17 



IPSWICH PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

FY 2004 Budget Summary by Departments 



INTRODUCTION: Action by the Annua! Town Meeting, Monday April 7, 2003. will establish the amount of money to be set 
aside for schools. Once this budget total is established, the School Committee, by statute, has fiscal autonomy and may use 
the funds in the best interest of the schools. The Town of Ipswich School Budget, which follows, represents the School 
Committee's best estimate of the way funds voted at Town Meeting win be utilized. 





FY 04 


FY 04 


. FY 03 




FY 03 




FY 02 




FY 02 % CHANGE 


Description 


FTE 


BUDGET 


FTE 




BUDGET 


EXPENDED 




BUDGET FY 03 




















to FY 04 


Doyon Elementary School - Projected Ei 


Trollment471 Students 
















Pre-School Subtotal 


2.72 S 


71,190 


2.72 


$ 


73.098 


$ 


51.611 


$ 


51 ,072 


Kindergarten Subtotal 


2.00 S 


95,097 


2.00 


S 


90.344 


$ 


83,643 


$ 


111,595 


Gr. 1-5 Classroom Instruction 


24.40 S 


1,317,156 


25.40 


% 


1,333,810 


S 


1.340.279 


s 


1,288,827 


Library. Media STechnology 


1.00 s 


20.796 


2.30 


$ 


67.377 


$ 


63,307 


S 


60,873 


Health Services Subtotal 


1.00 S 


35.860 


1.00 


$ 


35,774 


$ 


33,607 


$ 


34,285 


Guidance Subtotal 


1.00 $ 


60,235 


1.00 


$ 


60,210 


$ 


55.935 


$ 


55,842 


Cc-cumcular & Field Trips 


0.00 $ 


. 


0.00 


$ 


- 


s 


1,722 


s 


1.000 


Special Education & ESL 


22.38 S 


603,941 


22.15 


$ 


609,472 


$ 


586.207 


$ 


626,506 


Principal's Office Subtotal 


2.81 S 


161,490 


2.81 


s 


160,955 


$ 


155,119 


$ 


154,462 


Building Operations & Support 


2.60 S 


161,733 


4.12 


$ 


200,639 


$ 


212,716 


s 


208.200 


Total Doyon Appropriated Budget 


59.91 $ 


2,527,498 


63.50 


$ 


2,631,679 


3 


2,584,146 


s 


2,592,662 -3.95% 


Winthrop Elementary School - Projected Enrollment 491 Students 
















Preschool Subtotal 


2.82 S 


69,215 


2.73 


$ 


66,534 


$ 


61,207 


$ 


70,844 


Kindergarten Subtotal 


2.00 S 


101.672 


2.00 


$ 


114,656 


$ 


111,892 


s 


109,505 


Gr. 1-5 Instruction Subtotal 


24.40 $ 


1,363,048 


24.50 


$ 


1,384,559 


$ 


1.380.921 


$ 


1,365,277 


Library. Media & Technology 


1.00 $ 


18,850 


1.50 


$ 


48.230 


$ 


46,370 


s 


51,106 


Health Services Subtotal 


1.00 $ 


47,793 


1.00 


$ 


47,850 


$ 


45,100 


s 


46,332 


Guidance Subtotal 


1.00 S 


42,385 


1.00 


$ 


40.847 


$ 


46,521 


$ 


41,894 


Co-cumcular & Field Trips 


0.00 S 


. 


0.00 


$ 


8,050 


S 


7,525 


$ 


8,200 


Special Education & ESL 


22.12 S 


595,812 


20.78 


$ 


600.857 


$ 


566.055 


$ 


567.881 


Principal's Office Subtotal 


2.88 S 


162.295 


2.88 


$ 


162,883 


s 


156,195 


s 


1 54,696 


Building Operations & Support 


2.13 S 


138,282 


3.95 


s 


220,090 


$ 


215,860 


$ 


215.240 


Total Winthrop Appropriated Budget 


59.35 $ 


2,539,352 


60.34 


$ 


2,634,556 


s 


2,637,646 


s 


2,630,975 -5.76% 


Ipswich Middle School - Projected Enrollment 511 students 
















Undistributed Subtotal 


0.00 s 


84,298 


0.00 


$ 


69,300 


$ 


166,103 


$ 


113.576 


English-Language Arts Suototal 


6.00 $ 


324,148 


6.00 


s 


322,422 


$ 


286.527 


s 


313.585 


Math Subtotal 


6.00 S 


270,824 


6.00 


s 


292.071 


$ 


268,345 


s 


263,810 


Science Subtotal 


5.00 $ 


281,095 


5.00 


$ 


270,347 


$ 


254,160 


$ 


254,220 


Social Studies Subtotal 


5.00 S 


254,915 


5.00 


s 


243.869 


$ 


239,775 


s 


236.069 


World Languages Subtotal 


2.00 S 


107,514 


2.00 


$ 


108,641 


$ 


98,341 


$ 


94.271 


Art Subtotal 


1.00 $ 


46.185 


1.00 


$ 


40.243 


s 


38.627 


$ 


50.356 


Music Subtotal 


2.10 $ 


123,977 


2.10 


s 


124.379 


$ 


116,985 


$ 


109.925 


PE-Health Instruction Subtotal 


2.20 S 


122.475 


2.20 


s 


122.475 


$ 


125.781 


$ 


118.164 


Technology Subtotal 


1.00 $ 


56,837 


1.00 


$ 


50.690 


$ 


48.728 


s 


42,910 


Life Skills Subtotal 


1.00 s 


67.585 


1.00 


s 


67.617 


s 


65.765 


$ 


65.651 


Library/AV Subtotal 


1.00 $ 


45.597 


1.00 


s 


45,597 


s 


45,365 


5 


45.388 


Extended Learning Program Subtotal 


0.00 - 




0.20 


s 


10.198 


$ 


8,873 


s 


6.000 


Health Subtotal 


1.09 S 


30,194 


1.09 


s 


30,978 


$ 


28.970 


s 


30.589 


Guidance Subtotal 


1.25 $ 


73.252 


1.00 


s 


63.689 


s 


61,627 


$ 


61.816 


Co-Curricular/Athletic Subtotal 


0.00 $ 


30.295 


0.00 


s 


29.595 


$ 


32,799 


$ 


30.295 


SPED Subtotal 


15.00 $ 


510.381 


16.31 


$ 


623.194 


$ 


502.247 


$ 


589.063 


English as Second Language 


0.00 S 


6.000 


0.00 


s 


- 


$ 


10,755 


$ 


2.000 


Pnncipal's Office Subtotal 


3.88 $ 


228.890 


3.88 


s 


226.835 


$ 


217,529 


$ 


209.936 


Transportation Subtotal 


0.00 - 




0.00 


$ 


- 


% 


2.323 


s 


2.600 


Total Middle School Approp. Budget 


53.52 $ 


2,664,462 


54.78 


s 


2,742,140 


$ 


2,619,625 


$ 


2,642.224 -2.83% 


Ipswich High School - Projected Enrollment 611 students 
















Undistnouted Subtotal 


000 $ 


99.197 


0.00 


s 


96.550 


s 


140.306 


s 


94.305 


English-Language Arts Subtotal 


6.85 S 


355,988 


6.35 


s 


336.923 


s 


302.474 


s 


295.755 


Math Subtotal 


7.15 S 


342.541 


6.25 


£ 


324.110 


$ 


317.809 


5 


310.427 



3/12#003FY04 FinComSummary xls 



18 



Science Subtotal 

Social Studies Subtotal 

Foreign Languages Subtotal 

Art Subtotal 

Music Subtotal 

PE-Health Instruction Subtotal 

Technology Education Subtotal 

Child Development Subtotal 

Business Subtotal 

Library Subtotal 

Health Subtotal 

Guidance Subtotal 

Co-Curricular Subtotal 

SPED Subtotal 

ESL Subtotal 

Principal's Office Subtotal 

Transportation Subtotal 

Athletics Subtotal 

High School Total 

Middle/High School Operations 



7.20 $ 

6.85 $ 

5.45 $ 

2.00 $ 

2.00 $ 

3.00 $ 

1.00 $ 

0.40 $ 

1.17 $ 

1.00 $ 

1.09 $ 

3.75 $ 

0.20 $ 

14.35 $ 

0.00 $ 

4.00 $ 

0.00 $ 

1.03 $ 

68.49 $ 

7.50 $ 



355,433 

272,878 

295,319 

88,763 

127,463 

152,696 

67,251 

22,361 

48,398 

46,224 

29,046 

175,807 

23,733 

879,594 

4,250 

268,321 

189,737 
3,845,000 

667,823 



6.10 $ 

6.45 $ 

5.05 $ 

2.00 $ 

2.00 $ 

2.40 $ 

1.00 $ 

0.40 $ 

1.17 $ 

1.00 $ 

1.09 $ 

3.50 $ 

1.60 $ 

13.50 $ 

0.00 $ 

4.00 $ 

0.00 $ 

1.03 $ 

64.89 $ 



317,598 

258,188 

271,424 

90,214 

125,605 

122,128 

65,191 

20,093 

46,938 

46,097 

29,021 

175,757 

48,134 

767,682 

263,411 

5,000 

197,512 

3,607,576 



275,977 

271,835 

255,484 

63,980 

128,684 

108,350 

65,585 

20,349 

45,924 

48,701 

26,978 

161,947 

39,610 

769,881 

2,547 

271,233 

5,233 

240,757 

3,563,644 



Districtwide Instruction, Administration and Services - Projected Districtwide Enrollment 2084 Students 



DW Instructional Services Subtotal 
DW Pupil Personnel (SPED) Subtotal 
ESL Subtotal 

School Committee Subtotal 
Superintendent's Office Subtotal 
Finance & Personnel Subtotal 
Fixed Costs Subtotal 
Elementary Capital Debt Subtotal 
Buildings & Operations Subtotal 
Transportation Subtotal 
Districtwide Total 

Appropriated School Budget Total 

HS-MS Debt Subtotal 
School Budget Grand Total 



3.90 $ 

1.10 $ 

0.00 $ 

0.16 $ 

3.00 $ 

3.00 $ 

0.00 $ 

0.00 $ 

0.50 $ 

0.00 $ 

11.66 $ 



356,459 

268,508 

200 

9,280 

218,994 

257,768 

1 ,499,781 

8,000 

121,343 

232,200 

2,972,333 



3.50 
1.75 
0.00 
0.16 
3.00 
3.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.83 



296,849 
302,273 

14,555 

198,055 

246,339 

1,391,637 

130,065 

84,380 



352,450 
278,986 

12,374 
190,552 
267,963 
1,289,654 
136,972 
117,130 



284,374 

262,689 

253,654 

60,517 

122,276 

100,925 

69,701 

19,907 

55,646 

49,288 

28,214 

168,701 

37,216 

784,112 

12,150 

258,023 

6,300 

245,891 

3,520,071 



8.30 $ 727,114 $ 633,711 $ 716,569 



0.00 $ 302,542 $ 387,631 $ 
12.24 $ 2,966,695 $ 3,035,584 $ 



377,481 
327,584 
200 
19,280 
176,989 
232,902 

1,270,363 
136,972 
190,750 
417,238 

3,149,759 



260.43 $ 15,216,468 264.05 $ 15,369,760 $ 15,074,356 $ 15,252,260 

0.00 $ 2,569,753 0.00 $ 2,565,878 $ 2,559,253 $ 2,711,224 

260.43 $ 17,786,221 264.05 $ 17,935,638 $ 17,633,609 $ 17,963,484 



6.58% 

-8.15% 



0.19% 
-1.00% 



-0.83% 



3/12/2003FY'04 FinComSummary.xls 



19 



Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance 
Committee recommended by a vote of 7 to 1. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

At the Annual Town Election on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, the 
ballot question (#1) passed with a vote of 1,860 for and 
796 against. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to choose one member of the Finance 
Committee for three [3] years. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Walter Pojasek nominated John Gahan to serve on the Finance 
Committee. Robert White, speaking on his behalf, offered to 
serve on the Finance Committee. After a few words from John 
Gahan, it was moved, seconded and so voted to close nominations. 
On a hand count with 12 5 for John Gahan and 2 60 for Robert 
White, Robert White was elected to the Finance Committee for a 
term of three years . 



Fred Paulitz informed the Moderator that many of those seated in 
the auditorium had not been checked in as voters. Mr. Grimes 
asked voters to check in and pick up a pink voting slip in the 
lobby. At 9:15 p.m., there were only 473 voters checked in. 

(Voters were asked to remove their campaign buttons at the town 
meeting by registrars and police officers.) When the Moderator 
asked voters if they wanted to put their pro-override buttons 
back on during the meeting, the voice vote was a resounding yes. 



ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 9 of the April 1, 2002, Annual Town Meeting (the FY03 
Municipal Operating Budget) , as amended by Article 1 of the 
October 21, 2002, Special Town Meeting: (a) by transferring sums 
of money between departmental accounts and/or by consolidating 
categories within departmental accounts, the total appropriation 
to remain the same as previously appropriated as a result of 
these transfers and/or consolidations; and (b) by appropriating 
additional sums; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 



20 



Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 9 of the April 1, 2 002, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY03 Municipal Operating Budget), as amended by 
Article 1 of the October 21, 2002, Special Town Meeting: 

a) Transfer $34,198 from : Miscellaneous Finance Debt Service - 
Payment of Interest to: Miscellaneous Finance Debt Service 
- Short-Term Principal; 

b) Transfer $11,911 from : Miscellaneous Finance Debt Service - 
Interest on Anticipation Notes to : Miscellaneous Finance 
Debt Service - Short-Term Principal; 

c) Transfer $8,885 from : Solid Waste Transfer Station Wages to: 

Reserve Fund; 
d) Transfer $2,400 from : Consolidated Building Maintenance 

Wages to: Health Department Salaries & Wages; 
e) Transfer $1,900 from : Consolidated Building Maintenance 

Wages to: Consolidated Building Maintenance Expenses; 
f) Transfer $6,900 from : Highway Salaries & Wages to: 

Miscellaneous Finance "Benefits-Health Insurance" 

so that the total municipal operating budget, as so amended and 
inclusive of override debt service shall total: $11,223,301 
offset by revenues totaling: 397,787 

leaving a net to be raised and assessed $10,825,514. 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums of money in 
addition to the sums already having been appropriated under 
Article 13 of the April 1, 2002, Annual Town Meeting and Article 
2 of the October 21, 2 002, Special Town Meeting (the FY03 Water 
and Sewer Division Budgets), said sums to be raised by 
transferring equal sums, respectively, from Water and Sewer 
Surplus; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Pat McNally moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 13 of the April 01, 2 002, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY2 003 Water and Wastewater Budgets) as amended by 
Article 2 of the October 21, 2002, Special Town Meeting, by 
increasing the wastewater division appropriation from $1,194,579 
to $1,204,579, said increase of $10,000 to be offset by transfer 
of an equal sum from Sewer Surplus. Seconded. 



21 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
Articles 10 and 11 of the April 01, 2002, Annual Town Meeting 
(School Capital Projects Debt Service, and the FY2 002 School 
Budget, respectively) by increasing the appropriations there- 
under and by transferring an equal sum from available funds for 
said purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: School Committee) 

School Committee member Joan Arsenault moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and School Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote . 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to re-authorize for FY04 the 
following revolving funds established under Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EV2: (a) Building Department 
permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas fees) collected in 
excess of $150,000, the purpose of said fund being to finance 
additional part-time help in the Building Department and other 
related expenditures, and to determine that no more than $10,000 
may be expended by the Building Department in FY04 from such 
excess funds transferred into such revolving fund; (b) Council 
on Aging activity fees, the use of said fund to pay for special 
activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time wages, and to 
determine that no more than $10,00 may be expended by the 
Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund during 
FY04; (c) Historical Commission Revolving Fund, the use of said 
fund to be to pay for preservation of Town records and to 
purchase expendable supplies, and to determine that no more than 
$5,000 may be expended by the Historical Commission from monies 
transferred into said fund during FY04 (source of funds: sale of 
publications; and (d) Health Division Revolving Fund, the use of 
said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures, and to determine that 
no more than $7,000 may be expended by the Health Division in 
FY04 from such excess funds transferred into said fund during 
FY04 (source of funds: Housing Code Inspection Fees); or to take 



22 



any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Town Manager 
and Board of Health) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: to re- 
authorize for FY04 the following revolving funds established 
under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EV2: (a) 
Building Department permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas 
fees) collected in excess of $150,000, the purpose of said fund 
being to finance additional part-time help in the Building 
Department and other related expenditures, and to determine that 
no more than $10,0 00 may be expended by the Building Department 
in FY04 from such excess funds transferred into such revolving 
fund; (b) Council on Aging activity fees, the use of said fund 
to pay for special activities, expendable supplies and/or part- 
time wages, and to determine that no more than $10,000 may be 
expended by the Council on Aging from monies transferred into 
said fund during FY04; (c) Historical Commission Revolving Fund, 
the use of said fund to pay for preservation of Town records and 
to purchase expendable supplies, and to determine that no more 
than $5,000 may be expended by the Historical Commission from 
monies transferred into said fund during FY04 (source of funds: 
sale of publications, e.g., replicas of the Declaration of 
Independence) ; and (d) Health Division Revolving Fund, the use 
of said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures, and to determine that 
no more than $7,000 may be expended by the Health Division in 
FY04 from such excess funds transferred into said fund during 
FY04 (source of funds: housing code inspection fees). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and 
remaining unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate the sum of $1,692.89 to pay bills incurred in prior 
years and remaining unpaid: 

Department, Category & Vendor Amount 

Miscellaneous Finance (Benefits) 

Clifton Wentworth (refund/ overpayment 



23 



of health insurance premiums) $ 1,462.64 

Veterans' Services Expenses: 

The Ipswich Center, Inc. 210.00 

Fire Department Expenses: 

Smith's Fire Equipment 20 . 25 

$ 1,692.89 

(2) to raise this appropriation by transferring the sum of 
$1,692.89 from free cash. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. With a vote of 1 against and more than 10 in 
favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by the required 
4/5 majority vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee 
relative to the municipal budget, and to raise, appropriate, 
transfer money from available funds, and change the purpose of 
the unexpended balances of prior appropriations, all to be used 
for the ensuing year's operations, including the compensation of 
elected Town officers, and to authorize the Town to enter into 
lease-purchase contracts for office equipment having a term of 
five years or less; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Finance Committee Chairman George Markos moved that the Town 

vote: (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of ($10,192,055) for 

the purposes indicated in the FY04 Municipal Operating Budget as 

outlined in the Finance Committee Report, and that: 

for the FY04 Municipal Operating Budget of $10,192,055 

the Town transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash 113,415 

Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library) 29,956 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 21,434 

Wetlands Protection Fund (Offset Conservation Commission; 

Cemetery Sale of Lots Fund (Offset Cemetery Capital 

Free Cash (Offset Planning Contracts- Tourism Promo 

Lottery Fund Additional Distribution 

Overlay Surplus 

Building Permit Revolving Fund - Excess Receipts 

Stabilization Fund 

Library Construction Grant 



24 



on) 





6, 


, 000 




594 







36, 


, 941 


37, 


, 500 


100, 


000 


60, 


300 


$ 406, 


140 



Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of: $9,785,915 

and 2) to raise and appropriate: 

for Override Debt Service: $1,053,989 

For a Total Appropriation of: $11,246,044 

And a Net to be Raised and Assessed: $10,839,904 

Seconded. 

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
for debt service payments and other costs related to the 
construction and furnishing of the new middle school and high 
school including, without limitation, moving expenses and 
expenses necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School; 
and (2) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised 
by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School 
Committee) 

School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $2,569,573 for FY04 debt 
service payments related to the construction and furnishing of 
the new middle school and high school including, without 
limitation, moving expenses and expenses necessary to secure the 
former Whipple Middle School. Seconded. 

School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. 

Members of the School Committee and the Finance Committee 
answered voter's questions. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote . 

ARTICLE 11 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of 
the School Committee relative to the School Department budget 
and to raise, appropriate, transfer money from available funds, 
and change the purpose of the unexpended balances of prior 
appropriations, all to be used for the ensuing year's 
operations; and to act upon a request to establish one or more 
new revolving funds pursuant to state law; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: School Committee) 

25 



113, 


,416 


21, 


434 












100, 


000 


36, 


941 


37, 


500 



School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $15,216,568 for the 
School Department budget for FY04 and 

for the FY04 School Department Budget of $15,216,568 

(2) to transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 

Lottery Fund Additional Distribution 

Medicaid Reimbursements 

Stabilization Fund 

Overlay Surplus 

Building Permit Revolving Fund - Excess Receipts 

$309,291 
Leaving a subtotal (for the school operating budget) 
net to be raised and assessed of: $14,907,277 

Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote . 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to cover the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual 
operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Whittier RVTHS 
Representative Raymond Morley) 

Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $303,516 for the Town's 
share of the FY04 annual operating, capital, and debt service 
expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 



26 



ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, 
Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by revenues of 
the Water Division during FY04; and (2) to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Sewer 
Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by 
revenues of the Sewer Division during FY04; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Water/Sewer 
Commissioners ) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,174,048 for the FY04 
operating, debt service, and capital expenses of the Water 
Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by 
revenues from the water division during FY04 as follows: 

for the FY04 Water Budget of $1,174,048 

(which net sum shall be offset by revenues of the water division 
during FY04) ; and 

(2) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,113,3 83 for the FY04 
operating, debt service, and capital expenses of the Wastewater 
Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by 
revenues from the sewer division during FY04 . Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
to survey, design, and construct improvements to the Town's 
water storage and distribution system (replacing the water main 
in County Road, painting the exterior of the Plover Hill Water 
Storage Tank, and replacing lead services); and (2) to raise 
this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial 
notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
44, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate $1,355,000 to survey, design, and construct 



27 



improvements to the Town's water treatment, storage and 
distribution systems; and (2) to raise this appropriation by- 
authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 8, as amended. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
under the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws, and to 
obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto; (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire easements in 
conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, 
or otherwise; (3) in furtherance of the project(s), to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any 
federal, state and/or private grants without further 
appropriation thereof; and (4) to determine whether said 
appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $218,114 for purposes 
authorized under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, as amended; and 

(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, 
and expend without further appropriation any federal and/or 
state grants that may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 13 of the Warrant for the April 01, 2002, Annual Town 
Meeting by increasing the appropriation authorized there-under, 
said additional appropriation to be met by transfer of available 
funds; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested 
by: Board of Selectmen) 



28 



Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $109,057 for purposes 
authorized under Chapter 9 of the General Laws, as amended, in 
addition to that previously raised and appropriated under 
Article 14 of the April 01, 2002, Annual Town Meeting, and to 
meet said appropriation by transferring an equal sum from 
available funds; and 

(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, 
and expend without further appropriation any federal and/ or 
state grants that may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To hear and act on the reports of the Committees and to continue 

such Committees as the Town may vote to continue; or to take any 

other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Moderator Grimes read the Commuter Rail Committee Report 
submitted by Dorcas Rice. It was moved, seconded and so voted 
to accept the report and continue the committee 

Harvey Schwartz read the report for the Town Committee 
investigating the operations and financial records of the 
Feoffees of the Grammar School. It was moved, seconded and so 
voted to accept the report and continue the committee. 

Terri Stephens read the report for the Hall-Haskell House 
Committee. It was moved, seconded and so voted to accept the 
report and continue the committee. 

Carl Nylen read the report for the Open Space Committee. It was 
moved, seconded and so voted to accept the report and continue 
the committee. 

Toni Poltack read the report for the Government Study Committee. 
It was moved, seconded and so voted to accept the report and 
continue the committee. 

Larry Seidler read the report for the School Building Committee. 



29 



It was moved, seconded and so voted to accept the report and 
continue the committee. 

Town Manager George Howe read the report for the Ipswich 
Coalition for Youth. It was moved, seconded and so voted to 
accept the report and continue the committee. 

Moderator Grimes moved to continue the Historic District Study 
Committee and the School Building Needs Committee. It was 
seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C(g), to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money to fund a supplement to the FY04 
School Department Operating Budget, said appropriation to be 
contingent upon the passage of an override referendum under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C 
(m) ; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested 
by: School Committee) 

School Committee member Joan Arsenault moved that the Town vote, 
pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
59, Section 21C(g), to raise and appropriate $460,000 to fund a 
supplement to the FY04 School Department Operating Budget, said 
appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override 
referendum under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 59, Section 21C (m) ; 

The question to be voted on the ballot shall read: 

"2. Shall the Town of Ipswich be allowed to assess an additional 
$460,000 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
purposes of funding a supplement to the School Department 
Operating Budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2 003? 
Yes / / No / /" 
Seconded. 

School Committee unanimously recommended, Board of Selectmen 
recommended by a vote of 4 to 1 and Finance Committee 
recommended by a vote of 7 to 1 . 

Several voters spoke in favor and one against the motion. The 
question was moved, seconded and so voted. The main motion 
carried by majority voice vote. 

30 



At the Annual Town Election on Tuesday, April 15, 2 003, the 
ballot question (#2) failed with a vote of 1,361 for and 1,401 
against . 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C(g), to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money to pay for wages and expenses 
associated with training all permanent full-time police officers 
and permanent full-time fire fighters as emergency medical 
technicians [EMTs] at the basic certification level and for on- 
going EMT wages and expenses, and to obtain any materiel and or 
services necessary and incidental thereto; said money to be 
added to the FY04 municipal operating budget appropriated under 
Article 9 of the Warrant for the April 07, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting; said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of 
an override referendum under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C(m); or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote, pursuant to the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 
21C(g), to raise and appropriate the sum of $67,700 to pay for 
wages and expenses associated with training all permanent full- 
time police officers and permanent full-time fire fighters as 
emergency medical technicians [EMTs] at the basic certification 
level and for on-going EMT wages and expenses, and to obtain any 
materiel and or services necessary and incidental thereto; said 
money to be added to the FY04 municipal operating budget 
appropriated under Article 9 of the Warrant for the April 07, 
2003, Annual Town Meeting; said appropriation to be contingent 
upon the passage of an override referendum under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C(m). 

The question to be voted on the ballot shall read: 

"3. Shall the Town of Ipswich be allowed to assess an additional 
$67,700 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
purposes of paying for wages and expenses associated with 
training all permanent full-time police officers and permanent 
full-time fire fighters as emergency medical technicians [EMTs] 
at the basic certification level and for on-going EMT wages and 
expenses, and to obtain any materiel and or services necessary 
and incidental thereto, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
2003? Yes / / No / /" 
Seconded. 



31 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended . 

Several voters spoke in favor and against. The question was 
moved, seconded and so voted. The main motion carried by 
majority voice vote. 

At the Annual Town Election on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, the 
ballot question (#2) failed with a vote of 1,328 for and 1,403 
against . 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
to survey, design, and prepare bid documents for construction of 
a sanitary sewer extension to serve the area of 199-272 High 
Street, and to approve said extension consistent with the 
provisions of town bylaws; (2) to determine that this project 
shall be subject to betterment assessment at a rate sufficient 
to recover 100% of said project costs, and to determine the 
method of calculation; and (3) to raise this appropriation by 
authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as amended; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel announced that Article 2 would be divided 
into four motions and each motion would be voted on separately. 

Selectman James Engel moved (1) that the Town vote to approve 
the construction of an extension to the sanitary sewer system in 
the area of 199-272 High Street, said extension being in excess 
of 500 lineal feet, consistent with the provisions of General 
Bylaws Chapter XV, Section 16. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Finance Committee 
unanimously opposed the motion. 

Conservation Commission Chairman David Standley and several 
voters from the High Street area spoke against the motion. The 
question was moved, seconded and so voted. The voice vote on 
the first motion was inconclusive. On a hand count, the 
Moderator declared the motion failed the required 2/3 's vote. 
Seven voters stood to question the vote on the hand count. On 
another hand count with 74 in favor and 138 against, the first 



32 



motion (1) failed to pass the required 2/3 's vote. 

Selectman James Engel moved (2) that the Town vote to approve 
the construction of an extension to the sanitary sewer system in 
the area of 199-225 High Street, said extension being in excess 
of 500 lineal feet, consistent with the provisions of General 
Bylaws Chapter XV, Section 16; said extension, which shall be 
designed on the basis of the Town's Community Facilities Plan, 
having been requested by the residents abutting thereto. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board 
unanimously recommended. The Open Space Committee took no 
position. 

Mr. Engel answered several questions from the voters in the High 
Street area. The second motion (2) carried by majority voice 
vote. 

Selectman James Engel moved (3) that the Town vote to a) 
appropriate the sum of $116,000 to survey, design, and construct 
a sanitary sewer extension in the area of 199-225 High Street; 
b) to determine that, if the project is constructed, the costs 
authorized herein shall be subject to betterment assessment at a 
rate sufficient to recover 100% of said costs, using a per unit 
method based on current dwelling units (or dwelling unit 
equivalents) plus potential dwelling units allowable under 
current conventional (non-c.40B) zoning; and c) to raise this 
appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as amended. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. The third motion (3) carried by unanimous voice 
vote . 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to survey, design and 
construct extraordinary repairs to the Winthrop and Doyon 
Elementary Schools, including original equipment and 
landscaping, paving and other site improvements incidental or 
directly related to such remodeling, reconstruction or repair, 
and to obtain any materiel and/or services necessary and 
incidental thereto; (2) to authorize appropriate town officials 
to apply for, accept, and expend any federal and/or state grants 



33 



and private gifts therefor; to raise said appropriation by 
authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: School Committee) 

School Committee member Edmund Traverso moved that the Town 
vote: (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $500,000 to 
survey, design and construct extraordinary repairs to the 
Winthrop and Doyon Elementary Schools, including original 
equipment and landscaping, paving and other site improvements 
incidental or directly related to such remodeling, 
reconstruction or repair, and to obtain any materiel and/or 
services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize 
appropriate town officials to apply for, accept and expend any 
federal and/or state grants and private gifts therefor; and (3) 
to raise said appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial 
notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
44, Section 7 (3A) . Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote . 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote: 

(a) to accept Hickory Lane as a town street as shown on the 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan, Bradley Estates, Owner: Ipswich 
Realty Corp., scale 1"=40', dated July 26, 1996, and revised 
October 21, 1996, January 10, 1997, and February 14, 1997, 
prepared by Apple Associates, Inc., Brian J. Buia, Registered 
Professional Engineer, and recorded at the Essex South District 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 319, Plan 50, a copy of which is on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk; and to further authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift an interest in said 
street either in fee or easement, to use said street (Hickory 
Lane) for all purposes for which public ways are used in the 
Town ; and 

(b) to accept the gift of land designated as Remaining Land (Lot 
1) as shown on the above-referenced definitive subdivision plan, 
said lot containing 23.8671 acres, more or less; said parcel to 
be transferred to the care, custody and control of the 
Conservation Commission; or to take any other action thereto. 



34 



(Requested by: Planning Board) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: 

(a) to accept Hickory Lane as a town street as shown on the 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan, Bradley Estates, Owner: Ipswich 
Realty Corp., scale 1"=40', dated July 26, 1996, and revised 
October 21, 1996, January 10, 1997, and February 14, 1997, 
prepared by Apple Associates, Inc., Brian J. Buia, Registered 
Professional Engineer, and recorded at the Essex South District 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 319, Plan 50, a copy of which is on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk; and to further authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift an interest in said 
street either in fee or an easement to use said street (Hickory 
Lane) for all purposes for which public ways are used in the 
Town ; and 

(b) to accept the gift of land designated as Remaining Land (Lot 
1) as shown on the above-referenced definitive subdivision plan, 
said lot containing 23.8671 acres, more or less; said parcel to 
be transferred to the care, custody and control of the 
Conservation Commission. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 3 

To see if the Town will transfer the care, control and custody 
of a 29.5 acre property formerly conveyed to the Town by Philip 
and Mary Ross, situate in the area of High Street (Assessors Map 
21, Lot 104) from the Board of Selectmen to the Town of Ipswich 
Water Division by and through the Board of Water Commissioners, 
for watershed protection purposes; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town transfer the care, 
control and custody of a 29.5 acre property formerly conveyed to 
the Town by Philip and Mary Ross, also in the area of High 
Street (Assessors Map 21, Lot 104) from the Board of Selectmen 
to the Town of Ipswich Water Division by and through the Board 
of Water Commissioners, for watershed protection purposes. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



35 



ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money, 
in addition to that appropriated under Article 19 of the April 
3, 2 00, Annual Town Meeting, as amended under Article 7 of the 
Warrant for the October 16, 2000, Special Town Meeting, to 
survey, design, and construct a pedestrian bridge across the 
Ipswich River and to obtain any materiel and/or services 
necessary and incidental thereto; and (2) to raise this 
appropriation by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or by 
borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Director of Planning and Development Glenn Gibbs) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate the sum of $24,000 in addition to that appropriated 
under Article 19 of the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting, as 
amended under Article 7 of the Warrant for the October 16, 2000, 
Special Town Meeting, to survey, design, and construct a 
pedestrian bridge across the Ipswich River and to obtain any 
materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; and 
(2) to meet this appropriation by transferring the sum of 
$24,000 from the Ipswich Open Space, Recreation, and Water 
Supply Protection Fund as most recently amended under Article 2 
of the Warrant for the October 18, 1999, Special Town Meeting. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 5 

To see if the Town will vote to accept School Street as a town 
way, from the intersection of Linebrook Road to the 
southwesterly property line of land of the Town under the 
custody of the School Committee (Assessors Map 30B, Lot 6), as 
shown on "Land of John Wegzyn Plan of Lots 1-8 on School Street, 
Ipswich, Mass. Scale 1" = 40', prepared by Philip L. Pattison, 
Registered Professional Civil Engineer & Land Surveyor, January 
7, 1965 (Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 103, 
Plan 98)", a copy of which plan and street deed are on file with 
the Town Clerk; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: DPW Robert Gravino) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote to accept 
School Street as a town way, from the intersection of Linebrook 
Road to the southwesterly property line of land of the Town 
under the custody of the School Committee (Assessors Map 30B, 

36 



Lot 6) , as shown on "Land of John Wegzyn Plan of Lots 1-8 on 
School Street, Ipswich, Mass. Scale 1" = 40', prepared by Philip 
L. Pattison, Registered Professional Civil Engineer & Land 
Surveyor, January 7, 1965 (Essex South District Registry of 
Deeds, Plan Book 103, Plan 98)", a copy of which is plan (and 
street deed) are on file with the Town Clerk. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 6 

To see if the Town will transfer the care, control and custody 
of a 91 -acre property formerly conveyed to the Town by the Trust 
for Public Land situated in the area of Jeffreys Neck Road (a 
portion of Assessors' Map 22D, Lot 48) from the Board of 
Selectmen to the Town of Ipswich Conservation Commission for 
conservation purposes; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Pat McNally moved that the Town transfer the care, 
control and custody of a 91-acre property formerly conveyed to 
the Town by the Trust for Public Land situated in the area of 
Jeffreys Neck Road (a portion of Assessors' Map 22D, Lot 48) 
from the Board of Selectmen to the Town of Ipswich Conservation 
Commission for conservation purposes (under Article 97 of the 
Massachusetts Constitution. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Conservation 
Commission unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote: (a) to appropriate a sum of money 
to acquire easement interests held by the Estate of John B. 
Rogers, Sr. (Essex South District Registry of Deeds Book 5723, 
Page 65) and/ or of any other party (ies) upon a parcel of land 
owned by the Town in the area of High Street (Essex South 
District Registry of Deeds Book 10017, Page 67; Plan Book 113, 
Plan 42); (b) to authorize the Board of Selectmen, on behalf of 
the School Committee, to acquire said easement interests by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain, or otherwise; and (c) to 
determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen at the request of the School 



37 



Committee) 

School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town vote: 

(a) to appropriate the sum of $2,500 to acquire easement 
interests held by the Estate of John B. Rogers, Sr. 
(Essex South District Registry of Deeds Book 5723, Page 
65) and/or of any other party (ies) upon a parcel of land 
owned by the Town in the area of High Street (Essex South 
District Registry of Deeds Book 10017, Page 67; Plan Book 
113, Plan 42) ; 

(b) to authorize the Board of Selectmen, on behalf of the 
School Committee, to acquire said easement interests by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain, or otherwise; and 

(c) to meet said appropriation by: transferring $2,500 from 

school choice funds . 
Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. 

Attorney Peter Ross, representing the estate of John Rogers 
moved to amend Article 27 . Town Counsel questioned the 
amendment. The amendment was withdrawn and corrected by Mr. 
Ross . 

Mr. Ross moved to amend Article 27 so that the appropriation and 
transfer of the sum of $2,500 be deleted and that the sum of 
$65,000 be appropriated and that to meet said appropriation the 
sum of $65,000 be raised by taxation. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and School Committee 
unanimously opposed the amendment. 

The Moderator declared the voice vote failed to pass on the 
amendment . 

The voice vote on the main motion was inconclusive. On a hand 
count with 5 against and more than 2 in favor, the Moderator 
declared the main motion passed by the required 2/3 's majority 
vote . 

ARTICLE 2 8 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 



38 



to petition the General Court to exempt any work on, or 
improvements to, the Middle School Annex building and/or 
property undertaken by a lessee of the building or property from 
the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 149, M.G.L. c. 30, and M.G.L. 
c.7, sec. 38K; said building being situate in the area of 25 
Green Street, and shown on Assessor's Map 42A, Lot 99; said 
improvements to be undertaken by the North Shore Housing Trust 
for the development of affordable elderly rental housing units; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Pat McNally moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 9 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to petition the Massachusetts General Court to establish an 
Affordable Housing Trust Fund, said fund to be used for the 
purpose of creating and maintaining affordable housing in the 
Town of Ipswich; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by Director of Planning and Development Glenn Gibbs) 

Selectman Pat McNally moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General Court 
to establish an Affordable Housing Trust Fund, said fund to be 
used for the purpose of creating and maintaining affordable 
housing in the Town of Ipswich; the Legislature may reasonably 
vary the form and substance of the requested legislation within 
the scope of the general public objectives of this petition. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous 
articles raising and/or appropriating money which have a direct 
impact on the levy for the next ensuing fiscal year, as 
contained in this warrant, for the purpose of completing a 
budget which is balanced and in compliance with the levy limit 
provisions of Proposition 2 x h, so called; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 



39 



Selectman James Foley moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn the Annual Town Meeting was seconded and so 
voted. The meeting was adjourned at 12:12 p.m. 

The voters are further warned that the following three 
additional questions shall be on the printed ballot for the 
April 15, 2003, elections to be held at the YMCA Hall, County 
Road, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.: 

"1. Shall the Town amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620 of 
the Acts of 1966 

"SECTION 28. Annual Budget . " by adding the following 
sentences to the end of said section: 

'Between May 15 and July 15 of each year, in closing the fiscal 
year the Town Manager, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen and the Finance Committee, may transfer funds between 
departments and categories appropriated within the municipal 
operating budget for the year then ending; said actions may be 
taken without further town meeting approval, provided the total 
budget is not increased, and provided further that the aggregate 
total of funds transferred pursuant to the provisions of this 
Section shall not exceed two percent (2.0%) of the total 
municipal operating budget for the year then ending.'? 
Yes / / No / /" 

"2. Shall the Town of Ipswich be allowed to assess an additional 
$460,000 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
purposes of funding a supplement to the School Department 
Operating Budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2 003? 
Yes / / No / / " 

"3. Shall the Town of Ipswich be allowed to assess an additional 
$67,700 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
purposes of paying for wages and expenses associated with 
training all permanent full-time police officers and permanent 
full-time fire fighters as emergency medical technicians [EMTs] 
at the basic certification level and for on-going EMT wages and 
expenses, and to obtain any materiel and or services necessary 
and incidental thereto, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
2003? Yes / / No / /" 

40 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting 
houses in the Town, by publication at least seven days prior to 
the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, 
or having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 10 th day of March in the year of our 
Lord, Two Thousand and Three. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James W. Foley 
Patrick J. McNally 
James R. Engel 
Harry Lampropoulos 
Edward B. Rauscher 



41 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
November 4, 2003 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet at the 
Performing Arts Center of the Ipswich High School/Ipswich Middle School, 134 High 
Street, in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE TWENTIETH OF OCTOBER, 2003, at 7:30 
o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called for a short postponement at 7:30 p.m. as the necessary 
quorum of 200 voters was not present. At 8:05 p.m. Mr. Grimes adjourned the meeting 
with only 170 voters present. The final count was 181 at 8:15 p.m. The meeting was 
rescheduled for Tuesday, November 4 th at 7:30 p.m. Following the adjournment, Senator 
Bruce Tarr presented citations from the State recognizing Ipswich High School as a 
Compass school. 

Special Town Meeting - November 4 th , 2003 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:45 p.m. with 217 voters present. 
The final count was 294 at 9 p.m. Following the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, Mr. 
Grimes recognized and observed a moment of silence for Cynthia Burns, a longtime 
Town employee, who passed away on November 1 st It was moved, seconded and so 
voted to admit non-voters. Mr. Grimes informed the voters about town meeting 
regulations and procedures and appointed the following tellers: Bill Wasserman, Bill 
Nelson and Laurie Hoffman. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige was Town 
Counsel. 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action previously taken under Article 9 of the 
April 07, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (the FY04 Municipal Operating Budget), by 
appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated under said Article 9 (said 
appropriation to be raised by taxes, by the transfer of available funds, or otherwise), by 
reducing said appropriation by transferring sums of money between departmental 
accounts, and/or by determining if a portion of said additional appropriations shall be 
offset by estimated receipts of user fees, in accordance with the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 
9 of the April 7, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (FY04 town operating budget) by: 



42 



1) amending the transfer from available funds: From : To : 
Building Inspection Revolving Fund $ 37,500 $ 76,354 
So that the offset transfer total equals 444,994 

2) amending the following sums as indicated 

Department & Category : From : To : 

Interest on Anticipation Notes; Debt 
Issuance Fees 171,265 44,465 

Miscellaneous Finance Debt Service- 
Short Term Principal 43,769 49,881 

so that the appropriation of $11,246,044 originally authorized under this article is reduced 
to $11,125,356 and the net to be raised and assessed is decreased from $10,839,904 to 
$10,680,362. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 9 of the Warrant for 
the April 7, 2003, Annual Town Meeting, as further amended under Article 1 of the 
Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting (FY04 town operating budget), 
by increasing the appropriation authorized thereunder to fund salaries and expenses for an 
open space stewardship position, said increase to be met by an equal sum to be 
transferred from available funds; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored 
by: Open Space Committee and Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 
9 of the Warrant for the April 7, 2003, Annual Town Meeting, as further amended under 
Article 1 of the Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting (FY04 town 
operating budget), by: 

1) amending the transfer of available funds: From: To: 

Open Space, Water Supply Protection, & 

Recreation Fund $ $ 9,800 

So that the offset transfer total equals: 454,794; and 

2) amending the following appropriated sums, as indicated: 

Department and Category: 

Planning Board Salaries 93,058 102,408 



43 



Planning Board Expenses 7,401 7,851; 

So that the appropriation of $11,125,356 authorized under this article is increased by 
$9,800 to $11,135,156 and the net to be raised and assessed remains the same as 
$10,680,362. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Open Space Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote: 

a) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 07, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY04 Water and Sewer Budget) by increasing the water division 
appropriation to be raised and assessed, said sum to be offset by revenues from the water 
division during FY04; and 

b) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 07, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY04 Wastewater Budget) by transferring funds in Sewer Surplus to offset 
this appropriation; and 

c) to appropriate a sum of money, in addition to that appropriated under Article 13 of the 
April 07, 2003, Annual Town Meeting, to offset a revenue deficit in the wastewater 
division for FY03, and to raise this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from 
Sewer Surplus; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Sewer Commissioners) 

Selectman James En gel moved that the Town vote: 

a) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 07, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY04 Water and Sewer Budget) by increasing the water division 
appropriation to be raised and assessed from $1,174,048 to $1,774,048, said additional 
$600,000 to be offset by revenues from the water division during FY04; 

b) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 07, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY04 Wastewater Budget) by amending the $1,1 13,383 wastewater division 
budget by transferring $49,805 in Sewer Surplus to offset this appropriation, leaving a net 
of $1,063,578 to be offset by revenues from the wastewater division during FY04; and 

c) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 01, 2002, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY03 Wastewater Budget) by amending the $1,194,579 wastewater division 
budget by transferring $119,163 in Sewer Surplus to offset this appropriation, leaving a 
net of $1,075,416 to be offset by revenues from the wastewater division during FY03. 
Seconded. 



44 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 1 1 of the Warrant for 
the April 07, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (the FY04 School Department Operating 
Budget): 

a) by appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated under said Article 11, 
said appropriation to be raised by taxes, by the transfer of available funds, or otherwise; 

b) by offsetting the previously-authorized appropriation by transfer of available funds; or 

c) by reducing said appropriation; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
School Committee) 

School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town amend its action taken 
under Article 11 of the Warrant for the April 7, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (The FY04 
School Department Budget): 

a) by reducing the appropriation from $15,216,568 to $15,003,142; 

b) by transferring from available funds $5,000 from the "Insurance Less than 
$20,000 Fund" so that the total transferred from available funds shall be 
$314,291; and the net to be raised and assessed is reduced from $14,907,277 to 
$14,688,851. Seconded. 

School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 12 of the April 07, 
2003, Annual Town Meeting (the FY04 Whittier budget) by decreasing the appropriation 
to meet the FY04 assessment; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley) 

Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley moved that the Town vote: to amend 
its action taken under Article 12 of the April 07, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (The 
FY04 Whittier RVTHS Budget) by decreasing the amount to be raised and assessed 
thereunder from $303,516 to $221,695. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



45 



ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 14 of the Warrant for 
the April 01, 2002, Annual Town Meeting, as amended under Article 16 of the Warrant 
for the April 07, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (the FY03 Chapter 90 appropriation), and 
to amend its action under Article 15 of the Warrant for the April 7, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY04 Chapter 90 appropriation), by decreasing the appropriations to match 
the actual funds to be allotted under Chapter 90 for FY03 and FY04; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Sponsor: DPW Director Bob Gravino) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to rescind its action taken under 
Article 14 of the April 1, 2002, Annual Town Meeting, thereby reducing the 
appropriation previously authorized thereunder from $109,470 to $0. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds 
a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote (a) to appropriate the sum of 
$14,783.78 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

Miscellaneous Finance (Benefits-Health Insurance) 

Robert Leet (refund - overpayment of premiums) $4,985.82 

Animal Control (Expense) 

Verizon Communications, Inc. 258.21 

Combined Building Maintenance (Expenses) 

Breen & Sullivan Heating Contractors 465.92 

Veterans Services (Expense) 

Frederic Jewett, MD 15.00 

Lahey Clinic 15.00 

School Department : (Benefits-Health Insurance) 

Anna L. Standley (refund - overpayment of premiums) $5,926.13 

Marie White (refund - overpayment of premiums) 3,117.70 

$14,783.78 

and (b) to meet this appropriation by raising $14,783.78 in taxes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



46 



ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to: 

1) amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich by: 

a) amending "HI. DEFINITIONS" as follows: 

Delete the definitions of AREA OF INFLUENCE, AQUIFER, CONFINING LAYER, 

PERMEABLE DEPOSIT, RATED CAPACITY, RECHARGE AREAS; 

Delete the definition of IMPERMEABLE SURFACE and substitute in lieu thereof the 
following definition: "Material or structure on, above, or below the ground that does not 
allow precipitation or surface water to penetrate directly into the soil beneath."; and 

Add, in the correct alphabetical sequence, the following definitions: 

"ZONE I (GROUND WATER): The area closest to the well, within a 400 foot radius of 
the well. 

ZONE II (GROUND WATER): The primary recharge area for the aquifer. This area is 
defined by hydrogeologic studies and approved by the DEP. 

ZONE A (SURFACE WATER): The landward area 400 feet from the edge of a reservoir 
and 200 feet from the edge of its tributaries and the land area between the surface water 
source and the upper boundary of the bank, provided that the edges of reservoirs and 
tributaries thereto are defined as the landward edges of any associated Bordering 
Vegetated Wetlands ("BVW") or, where BVW is not present, as the top of bank of 
reservoirs and tributaries thereto. Delineation of BVW and of "top of bank" shall be in 
accordance with current guidance published by the Mass. Department of Environmental 
Protection ("MADEP") or its successor agency. 

ZONE C (SURFACE WATER): The remaining area in the Water Supply Protection 
District not designated as Zone A, Zone I, or Zone II. 

WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION DISTRICT: The zoning district defined to overlay 
other zoning districts in the Town of Ipswich. The Water Supply Protection District may 
include specifically designated recharge areas. 

POTENTIAL DRINKING WATER SOURCES: Areas or aquifers which could provide 
significant drinking water in the future. 

NORMAL HOUSEHOLD USE: any or all of the following: 

i. 600 gallons or less of oil on site at any time to be used for heating of 

a structure or to supply an emergency generator, or 
ii. A total of 25 gallons (or the dry weight equivalent) or less of other 



47 



hazardous or toxic materials on site at any time, including oil not 
used for heating or to supply an emergency generator 

TREATMENT WORKS: Any device, process and property, real or personal, used in the 
collection, pumping, transmission, storage, treatment, discharge, disposal, recycling, 
reclamation, or reuse of waterborne pollutants, but not including any works that receive a 
hazardous waste from off the site of the works for the purpose of treatment, storage, or 
disposal. 

VERY SMALL QUANTITY GENERATOR: Any public or private entity, other than a 
residence, that produces less than 27 gallons by volume or an equivalent 100 kilograms 
by weight a month of hazardous waste or waste oil, but not including any acutely 
hazardous waste as defined in 310 CMR 30.136. 

b) amending "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS" by deleting subsection "C." in its 
entirety and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"C. Water Supply Protection Districts 

1. Purpose of District. The purpose of this Water Supply Protection District is to: 

a. promote the health, safety, and general welfare of the community by 
ensuring high quality and safe drinking water for the residents, institutions, 
and businesses of the Town of Ipswich; and 

b. preserve and protect existing and potential sources of drinking water 
supplies. 

2. Scope of Authority. The Water Supply Protection District (WSPD) is an overlay 
district, superimposed on the zoning districts, which operates in conjunction with 
other applicable local and state regulations. The WSPD shall apply to all: (a) new 
construction; (b) reconstruction or expansion of existing buildings; and (c) new or 
expanded uses in zones delineated for water supply protection. Specifically 
exempted from this section is normal household use of hazardous materials. 
Applicable activities and uses in a portion of one of the underlying zoning 
districts which fall within the WSPD must additionally comply with the 
requirements of this district. Uses prohibited in the underlying zoning districts 
shall not be permitted in the WSPD. 

3. Definitions. The following terms used in this section are defined in SECTION HI 
of the zoning bylaw: Groundwater, Impervious Surface, Normal Household Use, 
Potential Drinking Water Sources, Recharge Areas, Treatment Works, Very Small 
Quantity Generator, and Water Supply Protection District. 

4. For the purposes of this section, a Hazardous Material is defined as follows: Any 
substance or mixture of physical, chemical, or infectious characteristics posing a 
significant actual or potential hazard to water supplies or other hazards to human 
health were such substance or mixture released in the Town of Ipswich. 

48 



Hazardous materials include, without limitation; synthetic organic chemicals, 
petroleum products, heavy metals, radioactive or infectious wastes, acids and 
alkalis, and all substances defined as Toxic or Hazardous under Massachusetts 
General Laws (M.G.L.) Chapter(c) 21C and 21E and 310 CMR 30.00. 

5. Establishment and Delineation of WSPD. The WSPD established in this section 
consists of watersheds or recharge areas which are delineated on a map entitled 
"Water Supply Protection District, Town of Ipswich," and is dated September 19, 
2003. This map is hereby made a part of the Official Zoning Map of the Town of 
Ipswich and is on file in the Office of the Town Clerk. The boundaries of the 
WSPD do not necessarily coincide with property lines. In such instances, the 
regulations of this section shall apply only to that portion of a lot which lies 
within the WSPD. 

6. The WSPD consists of four zones (A, C, I, II), defined in 310 CMR 22.02. These 
zones are drawn around surface water supplies, community water supplies, and 
non-community water supplies as defined in 310 CMR 22.02. 

7. Use Regulations. 

a. Within the Water Supply Protection District all of the requirements of the 
underlying zoning districts continue to apply except that: 

i. Uses designated with a dash ( — ) in the Water Supply Protection 

Table of Uses shall not be permitted; and 
ii. Uses designated with "SPB" may only be permitted by special 

permit from the Planning Board, even if the underlying district 

requirements are more permissive. 

b. Uses designated with "P" or "NA" shall be controlled by requirements of 
underlying zoning districts. 

c. For uses located in areas within both the Zone A and Zone n, the most 
restrictive requirement shall apply. 

d. Except for uses related to the operation and maintenance of the Ipswich 
public water supply as defined in 310 CMR 22.00, no activities or uses are 
permitted within Zone I, as defined in Section HI. of this bylaw. 

e. Uses allowed in the underlying zoning district but prohibited by the Water 
Supply Protection Table may be allowed by Planning Board special permit, 
if the Planning Board finds that the Applicant has demonstrated, on the 
basis of geophysical evidence, that the proposed use or activity is located 
on property that should not have been included in Zone n, Zone A, or Zone 
C of the Water Supply Protection District. Any application for said special 
permit shall be accompanied by documentation prepared by a professional 
who meets the following two requirements: 

i. Is experienced in delineating hydrogeologic zones or wetlands in 
Massachusetts; and 

ii. Has one or more of the following credentials: 
Title Conferring Entity 

Registered Professional American Institute of Professional 



49 



Hydrologist Geologic Scientists 

Certified Professional Geologic American Institute of Professional 

Scientist Geologic Scientists 

Professional Wetland Scientist Society of Wetland Scientists 

Certified Groundwater Professional Association of Groundwater Scientists and 

Engineers 
The applicant shall provide information in substantial conformance with 
the criteria set forth in 310 CMR 22.00 and in the DEP's Guidelines and 
Policies for Public Water Systems for the delineation of Zones, as 
administered by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection, to show that the proposed use or activity is not within the 
Water Supply Protection District. The Planning Board may engage a 
professional as defined above to review the application containing said 
groundwater analysis and shall charge the applicant for the cost of the 
review. 

Water Supply Protection District Table of Uses 



Surface 


Ground 


Surface 


water 


water 


Water 


Zone A 


Zone II 


Zone C 



1) The creation, replacement, expansion or repair SPB P SPB 
of water bodies and dams, splash boards, and 

other water control, supply and conservation 
devices for non-Ipswich public water supply 
purposes, where otherwise legally permitted 

2) Drilling to a depth greater than 15 feet below SPB SPB P 1 
existing grade, not including drilling of 

monitoring wells by the Town of Ipswich. 

3) Replacement or repair of an existing sewage P P P 
treatment works subject to 314 CMR 3.00 or 

5.00, that will not result in a design capacity 
greater than the design capacity of the existing 
treatment works 

4) Discharge from sewage treatment subject to 314 SPB SPB SPB 
CMR 3.00 or 5.00, except as described in 3) 

above 

5) Replacement or repair of an existing treatment P P P 
or disposal works, as approved by DEP, subject 

to 314 CMR 5.00 for non-sanitary wastewater 
including industrial and commercial process 
wastewater, that will not result in a design 
capacity greater than the design capacity of the 
existing treatment works 



5C 



6) Publicly owned treatment works as approved by SPB SPB 

DEP, subject to 314 CMR 5.00 for non-sanitary 

wastewater including industrial and commercial 

process wastewater 

7) Treatment or disposal works, as approved by SPB 

DEP, subject to 314 CMR 5.00 for non-sanitary 

wastewater including industrial and commercial 
process wastewater, except as described in 3), 
5), and 6) above. 

8) Water remediation treatment works approved SPB SPB SPB 
by DEP, designed and operated in accordance 

with 314 CMR 5.00, for the treatment of 

contaminated ground or surface waters 

9) Hitching, standing, feeding and grazing no P NA NA 
closer than 100 feet from the edge of a surface- 
water source or tributary, if that 100 feet 

constitutes an established and maintained 

vegetative buffer strip 2 

10) Application of animal manure applied to the P P P 
soil as fertilizer, subject to Town of Ipswich 

Board of Health regulation, in accordance with 
the specifications of the Natural Resource 
Conservation Service Agricultural Waste 
Management Field Handbook, Appendix 13 3 

11) Enlargement or alteration of existing uses that SPB SPB SPB 
do not conform to the Water Supply Protection 

District. A special permit shall not be issued 
unless: 

a. Construction, use, or possible 
abandonment of project improves or 
does not affect quality of the water 
supply; 

b. In making its determination, the SPGA 
shall be guided by input from the Board 
of Health, the Water Commissioners, 
and the Director of Utilities for the 

Town of Ipswich. 



51 



13) Removal of soil, loam, sand, gravel, or any SPB 

other mineral substance within four (4) feet of 
historical high groundwater table elevation as 
determined from monitoring wells, redoximorphic 
features, or historical water table fluctuation data 
compiled by the United States Geological Survey, 
not including: 

a. Earth removal if substances removed are 
permitted to be and are re-deposited 
within 45 days of removal on site to 
achieve a final grading greater than 4 
feet above the historical high water 
marker 5 ; or 

b. Excavations for building foundations, 
roads, utility works, or wetland 
restoration 



52 



Water Supply Protection District Table of Uses Surface Ground Surface 

water water Water 
Zone A Zone II Zone C 

14) New sand and gravel operations 

15) Any new floor drainage system, in industrial or 

commercial process areas or hazardous material 

and/or hazardous waste storage areas, which 
discharges to the ground without a DEP permit or 
authorization. 

16) Landfills receiving only wastewater and/or — — — 
septage residuals including those approved by the 

DEP pursuant to M.G.L .c. 21, §26 through §53; 
M.G.L. c. Ill, §17; M.G.L c. 83, §6 and §7, and 
regulations promulgated thereunder; and other 
landfills and open dumps, as defined in 310 CMR 
19.006 

17) Solid waste combustion or handling facilities — — — 

18) Storage and/or disposal of sludge and septage — — — 

19) Automobile graveyards and junkyards, as 

defined in M.G.L. c. MOB, §1, and other salvage or 

junkyards 

20) On-site discharge or disposal of industrial — — — 
waste other than non-sanitary wastewater 

21) Facilities that generate, treat, store, or dispose — SPB SPB 
of hazardous waste that are subject to M.G.L. c. 

21C and 310 CMR 30.00, not including: 

a. Very small quantity generators of 
hazardous waste, as defined under 310 
CMR 30.353; 

b. Household hazardous waste centers and 
events under 310 CMR 30.390 6 ; 

c. Waste oil retention facilities required by 
M.G.L. c. 21, § 52A 6 ; or 

d. Water remediation treatment works 
approved by DEP, designed and 
operated in accordance with 314 CMR 
5.00, for the treatment of contaminated 

ground or surface waters 

22) Installation or replacement of underground 

tanks for storage of hazardous materials, including 

heating fuel, not including replacement of 
previously legally existing commercial 
underground storage tanks for storage of hazardous 
materials 5 



53 



Water Supply Protection District Table of Uses 


Surface 


Ground 


Surface 




water 


water 


Water 




Zone A 


Zone II 


Zone C 



23) Storage of liquid hazardous materials or other — SPB SPB 
leachable materials, as defined in M.G.L. c. 2 IE, 

liquid petroleum products and/ other leachable 
materials 7 , unless such storage is: 

a. Above-ground level on an impervious 
surface, and 

b. The storage is incidental to: 

i. Normal household use, outdoor 

maintenance, or the heating, 

ventilation and/or air conditioning 

(HVAC) systems of a structure; 
ii. Use of emergency generators, 

provided that no more than 600 

gallons is stored on site at any time; 

or 
iii. A response action conducted or 

performed in accordance with MGL 

c. 21E and 310 CMR 40.000 and 

which is exempt from a groundwater 

discharge permit pursuant to 314 

CMR 5.05(14); and 

c. Either 

i. in container(s) or above ground 

tank(s) within a building, or; 
ii. outdoors in covered container(s) or 

above ground tank(s) in an area that 

has a containment system designed 

and operated to hold either 10% of 

the total possible storage capacity of 

all containers, or 110% of the largest 

container's storage capacity, 

whichever is greater 
in which instance such storage is allowed by 
written approval of the Utilities Department 

24) Operation of dry cleaning facility — — SPB 

25) Operation of commercial car washing facility, — SPB SPB 
indoor or outdoor 

26) Establishment for repair and/or service of new — — SPB 
and/or used automobiles, trucks, aircraft, boats, 

motorcycles, and household and camping trailers 



54 



27) Petroleum, fuel oil and heating oil bulk stations 
and terminals, including, but not limited to, those 
listed under Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 
Codes 5171 and 5983, not including liquefied 
petroleum gas 



28) Wholesale distribution and/or warehousing of — P P 
commercial packaged liquid petroleum products, 

including Class A, B, and C motor fluids 

29) Bulk storage of deicing chemicals and sanding — — — 
materials, unless such storage, including loading 

areas, is within a covered structure designed to 
prevent the generation and escape of contaminated 
runoff and/or leachate, in which instance the 
storage is allowed by written approval of the 
Utilities Department 

30) Stockpiling and disposal of snow and ice 

containing deicing chemicals, brought in from 

outside the zone 

31) Outdoor storage of fungicides, rodenticides, 

pesticides, herbicides 

32) Storage of fertilizers (as defined in MGL 

Chapter 128, §64), animal manure and/or 

stockpiling agricultural wastes, not including such 
storage if enclosed within a structure designed to 
prevent the generation and escape of contaminated 
runoff and/or leachate, in which instance the 
storage is allowed by written approval of the 
Utilities Department 

33) Disposal of animal remains and operation of — P P 
cemeteries (human and animal) and mausoleums 

1 Subject to obtaining permit from the Building Inspector 

2 Vegetated buffer strips means either "Filter Strips" or "Field Borders" as defined in the 
MADEP Nonpoint Source Management Manual, and shall be not less than 100 feet in 
width. 

3 NRCS Handbook available in Planning Office, Town Hall. 

The system of storm water management and artificial recharge of precipitation shall be 
designed to prevent untreated discharges to wetland and surface water; preserve 
hydrologic conditions that closely resemble pre-development conditions; reduce or 
prevent flooding by managing peak discharges and volumes of runoff; minimize erosion 
and sedimentation; not result in significant degradation of groundwater; reduce 
suspended solids and other pollutants to improve water quality; and provide increased 
protection of sensitive natural resources. 
These standards may be met using the following or similar best management practices: 

(a) For single or two family residences, recharge shall be attained through site 
design that incorporates natural drainage patterns and vegetation to maintain 



5& 



pre-development stormwater patterns and water quality to the greatest extent 
possible. Stormwater runoff from rooftops, driveways and other impervious 
surfaces shall be routed through vegetated water quality swales, as sheet flow 
over lawn areas or to constructed stormwater wetlands, sand filters, 
infiltration systems, organic filters and/or similar systems, 
(b) For multi-family residential and non-residential uses, a stormwater 
management plan shall be developed which provides for the artificial recharge 
of precipitation to groundwater through site design that incorporates natural 
drainage patterns and vegetation and uses constructed (stormwater) wetlands, 
wet (detention) ponds, water quality swales, sand filters, organic filters, 
infiltration systems, or similar site appropriate best management practices 
capable of removing nitrogen and other contaminants from stormwater, in 
compliance with the Stormwater Management Standards and technical 
guidance contained in the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection's 1997 Stormwater Management Handbook, Volumes 1 and 2. No 
runoff shall be discharged directly to rivers, streams, and other surface water 
bodies, wetlands or vernal pools. 

Except when used for roof runoff from non-galvanized roofs, all such 
wetlands, ponds, swales or other infiltration facilities shall be preceded by oil, 
grease and sediment traps or other best management practices to facilitate 
control of hazardous materials spills and removal of contamination and to 
avoid sedimentation of treatment and leaching facilities. All such artificial 
recharge systems shall be maintained in full working order by the owner(s) 
under the provisions of an operations and maintenance plan approved by the 
permitting authority to ensure that systems function as designed. Infiltration 
systems greater than three (3) feet deep shall be located at least one hundred 
(100) feet from drinking water wells. Any infiltration basins or trenches shall 
be constructed with a three (3) foot minimum separation between the bottom 
of the structure and maximum groundwater elevation. 

5 Not allowed in Zone A. 

6 Not allowed in Zone A unless an existing use. 

7 These storage requirements shall not apply to the replacement of existing tanks or 
systems for the keeping, dispensing or storing of gasoline provided the replacement is 
performed in accordance with applicable state and local requirements. 

8. Procedures for Issuance of Special Permit. 

a. Special Permit Granting Authority. The Special Permit Granting Authority 
(SPGA) under this bylaw shall be the Planning Board. 

b. Review by Other Boards and Officials. Upon receipt of the special permit 
application, the Planning Board shall transmit one copy each to the Board 
of Health, Water Commissioners, Conservation Commission, and the 
Department of Utilities for their written recommendations. Failure to 
respond in writing to the Board within 35 calendar days of receipt shall 
indicate approval or no desire to comment by said agency. The applicant 
shall furnish the necessary number of copies of the application. 

c. Criteria. The Planning Board may grant the required special permit only 

56 



upon finding that the proposed use meets the criteria established in IX.J of 
this bylaw, as well as the following criterion: 

The proposed use shall in no way, during construction or thereafter, 
adversely affect the existing or potential quality or quantity of water that is 
available in the Water Supply Protection District; and further, the use shall 
be designed to avoid substantial disturbance of the soils, topography, 
drainage, vegetation, and other water-related natural characteristics of the 
site to be developed. 

d. Regulations. The Planning Board may adopt regulations to govern design 
features of projects. Such regulations shall be consistent with subdivision 
regulations adopted by the Planning Board of the Town of Ipswich. 

e. Submittal Requirements. The applicant shall file six copies of a site plan 
and attachments. The site plan shall be drawn at a proper scale as 
determined by the Planning Board and be stamped by a professional 
engineer. All additional submittals shall be prepared by qualified 
professionals. The site plan and its attachments shall at a minimum include 
the following information where pertinent: 

i. A complete list of chemicals, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, fuels, 
and other potentially hazardous materials to be used or stored on the 
premises in quantities greater than those associated with normal 
household use; 

ii. For those activities using or storing such hazardous materials, a 
Hazardous Materials Management Plan shall be prepared and filed 
with the Hazardous Materials Coordinator, Fire Chief, and Board of 
Health. The plan shall include provisions to protect against the 
discharge of hazardous materials or wastes to the environment due 
to spillage, accidental damage, corrosion, leakage, or vandalism, 
including spill containment and clean-up procedures. 

9. Monitoring. Periodic monitoring of existing on-site groundwater monitoring 
wells and/or permission to installation of new wells on the applicant's property 
may be required by the Planning Board as a condition of the special permit, 
subject to the conditions of this bylaw. Such monitoring may include sampling of 
wastewater disposed to on-site septic systems or cesspools, or to drywells, and 
sampling from groundwater monitoring wells to be located and constructed as 
specified in the special permit. Reports shall be submitted to the Planning Board 
and the Board of Health. The cost of complying with the requirements of this 
paragraph shall be borne by the applicant. 

10. Violations and Enforcement. Written notice of any violation of this bylaw shall 
be given to the responsible person as soon as possible upon observation, 
detection, knowledge or proof that a violation has occurred. Notice to the 
assessed owner of the property shall be deemed notice to the responsible person. 
Such notice shall specify the requirements or restriction violated and the nature of 
the violation, and may also identify the actions to remove or remedy the 
violations, preventive measures required for avoiding future violations, and a 

57 



schedule of compliance. A copy of such notice shall be submitted to the Planning 
Board, Board of Health, the Conservation Commission, and the Department of 
Utilities. The cost of containment, cleanup or other action of compliance shall be 
borne by the assessed owner of the property. 

For situations that require remedial action to prevent impact to the water resources 
within the Water Supply Protection District, the Building Inspector, the Board of 
Health, or any of their agents may order the owner and/or operator of the premises 
to remedy the violations. If said owner and/or operator does not comply with said 
order, the Building Inspector, the Board of Health, or any of their agents, if 
authorized to enter upon such premises under the terms of the special permit or 
otherwise, may act to remedy the violation. The cost of remediation shall be the 
sole responsibility of the owner and/or operator of the premises. 

11. Severability. A determination that any portion or provision of this Water 
Resource Protection District Bylaw is invalid shall not invalidate any other 
portion or provision thereof, nor shall it invalidate any special permit issued 
previously thereunder. 

12. Effective Date: The provisions of this subsection IX.C. shall go into effect on 
November 1, 2003."; and 

2) amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by mapping the Water 
Supply Protection District as shown on the attached map; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich and the Official Zoning Map as 
presented in Article 8 of the Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting, 
with the following revision: under (1) b) 8., in the Water Supply Protection District 
Table of Uses, add use "12)", said use and its allowances and prohibitions to read as 
follows: 



58 



MAP FOR ARTICLE 8 




59 



"Water Supply Protection District Table of Uses 


Surface 


Ground 


Surface 




water 


water 


Water 




Zone A 


ZoneEI 


Zone C 



12) The rendering impervious of: 

a. no more than fifteen percent (15%), or two P P P 
thousand five hundred (2,500) square feet, of any 

lot, which ever is greater 

b. no more than twenty percent (20%) of any lot, if 

artificial recharge is provided, 4 or, if artificial SPB SPB SPB 

recharge is infeasible, an alternate system of 
stormwater management 



SPB SPB 



c. more than twenty percent (20%) of any lot, if a 
system of stormwater management and/or artificial 
recharge is provided. 4 



" Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. 

Selectman James Engel responded to questions from Samantha Bailot of 242 High Street 
about her horses and agricultural activities. 

Mr. Santomenna revised his motion by including the footnotes that appeared on the 
printed copy of the motion that he read. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to revise the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS , B. Table 
of Dimensional and Density Regulations, as follows: 

■ Under the "maximum building area" column, for "commercial, wholesale" and 
"transportation, & industrial" uses in the "Industrial" District, change "40" 
percent to "50" percent; and 



60 



■ Under the "minimum open space" column, for the "commercial, wholesale" and 
"transportation, & industrial" uses in the "Industrial" District, change "30" 
percent to "20" percent; 

or to take any other action relative thereto (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Michael Ryan moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 9 of the Warrant 
for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to: 

1) amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

amend Section "IV. ZONING DISTRICTS " by: 

■ revising "A. Type of Districts" by adding, in the correct numerical order, "4. 
Village Incentive (VI) District" and by renumbering "5." through "13", 
accordingly; and 

■ revising "B. Intent of Districts" by 

> adding, in the correct numerical order, "2. Village Incentive (VI) District", to 
read as follows: 

"2. The Village Incentive (VI) District is intended primarily for residential 
uses in the areas located on the outskirts of the town center, generally situated 
between the Intown Residence District and the Rural Residence District. The 
predominantly permitted uses are single-family and two-family residences. 
Community facilities necessary to service the residential uses are permitted, 
but commercial and industrial uses are generally not permitted. Most of the 
properties in the district are served by municipal water supply and sewerage 
facilities."; and 

> renumbering "3." through "10." accordingly; and 

amend Section "V. USE REGULATIONS, Table of Use Regulations", by 

■ adding, after the "RRC" column, the "VI" column; 



61 



■ adding, under the heading "Residential", the use "Village Development Project", 
and assigning it a "SPB" under the "VI" column and a "-" under the remaining 
columns; and 

■ assigning to the "VI" District the same prohibitions and allowances as under the 
"RRA" District; and 

amend "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS " as follows: 

■ Amend "B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations" by 

> adding, under District, after "Rural Residence B (RRB)" and before 
"Intown Residence (IR)", a new District, the "Village Incentive (VI) 
District"; 

> assigning to the VI District the uses "Single-family, detached", "Single- 
family attached", "Single-family attached", "Single-family detached", 
"Two-family", Open Space Preservation Zoning", "All other permitted 
uses", and "Village Incentive Development"; 

> assigning for the uses "Single-family, detached", "Single-family 
attached", "Single-family attached", "Single-family detached", "Two- 
family", Open Space Preservation Zoning", and "All other permitted 
uses", the same dimensional requirements as required for those uses in the 
"RRA" & "RRC" Districts; 

> for the use "Village Development Project", assigning "See Section DC.L 25 " 
under the column "Minimum Lot Area"; "90" under the "Minimum Lot 
Width" column; "75" under the "Minimum Lot Frontage" column; "25", 
"15", and "20" under the front, side and rear minimum setback columns, 
respectively; "25" under "Maximum Building Area (%)" column; "35" 
under "Maximum Floor Area (%)" column; and "50" under "Minimum 
Open Space (%)" column; and 

> adding the footnote "29." as shown on the table, said footnote to read as 
follows: 

"29. For uses that are developed in accordance with "Section IX. 
SPECIAL REGULATIONS , L. Village Incentive Zoning", the maximum 
allowable density may be increased by up to 300%, by special permit from 
the Planning Board."; and 

■ Amend "B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations, Accessory Buildings" 
by: 

> adding, under District, after "Rural Residence B (RRB)" and before 
"Intown Residence (IR)", a new District, "Village Incentive (VI)"; 



62 



> assigning to the VI District the uses "Accessory buildings & structures in a 
Village Development Project 17 " and "All other accessory buildings & 
structures 17 "; 

> assigning for "Accessory buildings & structures in a Village Development 
Project 17 " minimum front, side, and rear setback requirements of "25", 
"15", and "10", respectively; 

> assigning for "All other accessory buildings & structures 1 " the same 
setbacks as required for said uses in the Rural Residence Districts; and 

amend "Section VIE. SIGNS, D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District" as follows: 

■ In paragraph 1., after the phrase "In Rural Residence A, B, C;" add "Village 
Incentive"; 

■ In paragraph 2., after the phrase "In Rural Residence A, B, and C;" add ", Village 
Incentive"; and 

amend Section "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS ", by adding a new subsection "L. 
Village Incentive District Regulations ", to read as follows: 

"L. Village Incentive District Regulations 

1. Purpose: The purpose of the Village Incentive Zoning Bylaw is to: 

a. Conserve significant open space parcels and protect natural features including 
historic farms and landscapes, wetlands, forests, streams, and scenic areas in 
the Town's rural sections; 

b. Foster housing patterns that extend the village character of Ipswich's 
downtown neighborhoods to appropriate nearby areas; 

c. Encourage a greater diversity of housing options in the Town, including 
affordable housing; 

d. Create attractive and pedestrian-friendly village-style neighborhoods that are 
in close proximity to shops, services, schools, and public transportation; and 

e. Promote a more efficient layout of streets, utilities and other public services 
by allowing dwellings in a compact village setting. 

2. Applicability: The Village Incentive Zoning Bylaw provides an optional development 
method whereby an applicant may develop a "Village Development Project (VDP)" in 
the Village Incentive Zoning District upon the issuance of a special permit from the 
Planning Board. The VDP shall require a minimum tract of one (1) acre. 



63 



For any proposed development in the Village Incentive Zoning District that would create 
six (6) or more dwelling units on a property or set of commonly-owned contiguous 
properties, the applicant shall be required to either undergo the VDP Application and 
Review Process in accordance with the provisions of Section IX.L.9 or submit a special 
permit application to the Planning Board for Open Space Preservation (Cluster) Zoning in 
accordance with the provisions of Section IX.A. Applicants may also submit a 
conventional subdivision plan at the same time, in accordance with the Ipswich 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations. The Planning Board shall, in compliance with 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40 A, Section 9, hold a public hearing on the 
proposed VDP application, and a concurrent public hearing on the proposed conventional 
subdivision plan, if applicable. In the event both a VDP plan and a conventional 
subdivision plan are submitted, the Planning Board shall recommend, prior to the close of 
the public hearing, which plan it considers most beneficial to the Town, and applicants 
shall, also prior to the close of the public hearing, elect which plan they wish to pursue, 
and shall inform the Planning Board of their choice in writing. For subdivisions that 
would create five (5) or fewer dwelling units on a tract of land or set of commonly owned 
properties, applicants may undergo the VDP Application and Review Process or submit 
an special permit application for Open Space Preservation (Cluster) Zoning, in addition 
to filing a conventional subdivision plan. Any special permit application submitted under 
the provisions of this subsection, which involves the subdivision of land, shall be subject 
to the approval of the Planning Board under the Rules and Regulations Governing the 
Subdivision of Land in Ipswich. 

3. Permitted Uses: Within a VDP, the following uses, and no others, may be permitted: 

a. Single-family detached dwelling; 

b. Single-family attached dwelling; 

c. Two-family dwelling; 

d. Community uses; 

e. Religious uses; and 

f. Educational uses. 

4. Density Standards: Within a VDP, the maximum allowable density shall be calculated 
as follows. 

a. Base Density: In order to determine the Basic Maximum Number of Dwelling 
Units, the developer shall submit a "Yield Plan" that indicates the maximum 
number of lots achievable under a conventional layout in accordance with 
Section VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS , B. Table of 
Density and Dimensional Regulations. The development depicted in the Yield 
Plan shall not alter any land areas in which such activity would be precluded 
by normal application of state and/or town laws and/or regulations governing 
wetlands and riverfront areas, or by the existence of floodplain areas or steep 
(over 25%) slopes. If the proposed VDP would utilize public sewer, then the 
Yield Plan may assume that public sewer is available. If the proposed VDP 



64 



will not utilize public sewer, the applicant shall provide evidence acceptable 
to the Planning Board that on-site wastewater treatment and disposal systems 
may be permitted and constructed to serve all the lots proposed under the 
Yield Plan as submitted. This evidence shall include documentation 
demonstrating suitable soil and groundwater conditions determined by 
representative sampling and testing of the buildable areas of the tract using 
methods approved by the Board of Health, and shall at a minimum consist of 
one determination of soil permeability and one observation of maximum 
ground water elevation per two acres of otherwise buildable land, such tests to 
be distributed with reasonable uniformity over the tract. For the Yield Plan to 
be approved, all such determinations and observations shall meet this 
requirement, except that if more than five are made, only seventy-five percent 
(75%) of said determinations and observations need meet this requirement. 

b. Open Space Conservation Requirement: To be eligible for a density bonus, an 
applicant must conserve open space in the Town of Ipswich by utilizing one 
of the following two methods: 

(1) Land Conservation Method: The applicant is required to provide 
ELIGIBLE OPEN SPACE, which is permanently restricted in 
accordance with IX.L.8. of this bylaw. For purposes of this subsection 
L., ELIGIBLE OPEN SPACE is defined as areas of land in the Rural 
Residence Districts which are determined by the Planning Board to 
have value as open space. The Board shall use as a basis for such 
determination the CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING OPEN SPACE as 
amended, and shall seek the recommendation of the Open Space 
Committee before making the determination. ELIGIBLE OPEN 
SPACE shall not include land that is within floodplain, riverfront area 
or which has slopes greater than 25%, and no more than 25% of the 
land shall be wetlands. 

(2) Payment-in-Lieu Method: The Planning Board may allow the 
applicant, in lieu of providing permanently restricted open space, to 
contribute funds to the Town's Open Space and Water Supply 
Protection Fund. Said funds shall be used for the purchase of open 
space not previously protected or acquired by the Town, or for other 
activities related to the protection and stewardship of open space. The 
amount of the contribution to this fund per bonus dwelling unit shall 
be a base amount of $50,000. The base amount may be adjusted by 
the Planning Board from time to time by the issuance of regulations. 
The required contribution shall be the base amount plus an annual 
adjustment based on the median values of residential property types 
101-103, as prepared by the Ipswich Assessor's Office using the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue LA-4 form and based on the 
most recently certified tax rate. The base year for purposes of 
calculating the annual adjustment shall be FY04. 

c. Density Bonus: The number of dwelling units within a VDP may be 
increased pursuant to compliance with L.5.b above. For the Land 



65 



Conservation Method, the density bonus for dwelling units shall be calculated 
by multiplying the number of acres of ELIGIBLE OPEN SPACE times 1.5, 
then rounding down to the next lower whole number. In no instance shall a 
density bonus for dwelling units in a VDP exceed three hundred percent 
(300%) of the Basic Maximum Number of Dwelling Units allowed in the 
VDP. 

d. Inclusionary Housing Requirement: Ten percent of the residential units in a 
VDP shall comply with the affordability requirements of Section IX.I. of this 
bylaw. 

5. Dimensional Requirements: The dimensional requirements in a VDP shall be as 
follows: 

a. The minimum lot size for a single-family detached dwelling unit shall be 
10,000 square feet. The minimum lot size for a single-family attached 
dwelling unit or a two-family dwelling unit shall be 12,000 square feet. The 
minimum lot size for all permitted non-residential uses shall be 20,000 square 
feet. 

b. The minimum frontage, setbacks, and open space, and the maximum building 
area and floor area shall be as specified in the B. Table of Dimensional and 
Density Regulations. 

6. Development Standards: The following development standards shall apply to any 
VDP. 

a. Water Service: The development shall be served by a water system deemed 
adequate for fire protection and domestic use by the Planning Board, based on 
the recommendations of the Water Commissioners and the Fire Chief. 

b. Wastewater Disposal: The development shall be served by the Town's sanitary 
sewer system or by a private central sanitary sewer system. All systems shall 
be subject to approval by the Board of Health and any other permitting 
authority of competent jurisdiction. 

c. Buildings: The VDP may consist of any combination of single-family 
detached, single-family attached and two-family residential structures. 
Applicants are encouraged to build structures that: (1) have articulated 
footprints, pitched roofs, and varied facades; and (2) are oriented toward the 
street serving the premises. 

d. Parking: Parking shall be required as specified in Section VII. of this bylaw. 

e. Common Driveways: Common driveways serving not more than two (2) 
residential lots may be provided in a VDP pursuant to Section IX. E of this 
bylaw. 

7. Open Space Restriction: If the applicant chooses to satisfy the Open Space 
Conservation Requirement using the Land Conservation Method described in Section 



66 



IX.L.5.C (1), the open space that is conserved shall be restricted in a manner acceptable to 
the Planning Board by one or more of the following methods: 

a. Conveyed to the Town of Ipswich and accepted by it for open space use to be 
held in the care, custody and control of the Conservation Commission, 
pursuant to M.G.L. Ch. 40, Section 8c; 

b. Conveyed to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as part of a state forest, 
park, or wildlife management area; 

c. Conveyed to a non-profit corporation, the principal purpose of which is the 
conservation of open space, for conservation purposes; or 

d. Made subject to a conservation restriction prepared in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 31 and Section 33, inclusive, of chapter 184 of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts running in favor of 
either the Town or, upon the approval of the Planning Board, a non-profit 
corporation, the principal purpose of which is the conservation of open space. 
The conservation restriction shall provide that such land shall be kept, in 
perpetuity, in an open or natural state, in accordance with the above-noted 
sections of Chapter 184 of the General Laws. 

8. Application and Review Process: The VDP application and review process shall be as 
follows: 

a. Pre-application Process: An applicant for a VDP is encouraged to request a 
pre-application review at a regular business meeting of the Planning Board. 
The purpose of the pre-application review is to minimize the applicant's costs 
of engineering and other technical experts, and to commence negotiations 
with the Planning Board at the earliest possible stage in the development. At 
the pre-application session, the applicant may outline the proposed VDP, seek 
preliminary feedback from the Planning Board and/or staff, and set a 
preliminary timetable for submittal of a formal application. With the 
permission of the applicant, and at the expense of the applicant, the Planning 
Board may engage technical experts to review the informal plans of the 
applicant and to facilitate submittal of a formal application for a special 
permit. 

b. Concept Plan and Special Permit Application: All special permit applications 
for a VDP shall be made and filed on the appropriate application form. The 
VDP Concept Plan shall comply with the Form and Contents for a Preliminary 
Subdivision (Section 4.3 of the Ipswich Subdivision Rules and Regulations) 
and shall also show the approximate location of proposed lot lines, buildings, 
trails and sidewalks, as well as a regrading plan for the site. The Concept Plan 
shall be prepared by a registered professional land surveyor and a registered 
professional landscape architect. The Special Permit Application shall discuss 
the methods by which the VDP will satisfy the Open Space Conservation 
Requirement and the Inclusionary Housing Requirement. For an application 
to be considered complete, it shall provide all the information required by the 
Rules and Regulations Governing Granting of Special Permits, available from 

67 



the Department of Planning and Development. The Special Permit 
Application shall also include a Yield Plan as described in Section IX.L.5. If 
a proposed development filed under this subsection also requires subdivision 
approval, the VDP Concept Plan shall be considered to have served the 
purpose of a preliminary subdivision plan. 

c. Public Hearing: At the time of filing the VDP Concept Plan and Special 
Permit Application, applicants may also file a definitive subdivision plan. 
Alternatively, applicants may wait and file the definitive subdivision plan 
following the Planning Board's decision on the VDP Special Permit 
Application. Following the submission of the VDP Special Permit Application 
and/or definitive subdivision plan, the Planning Board shall, in compliance 
with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40A, Section 9, hold a public 
hearing on the VDP proposal, and a concurrent public hearing on the proposed 
conventional subdivision, if applicable. In the event both a VDP and a 
conventional subdivision plan are submitted, the Planning Board shall, prior to 
the close of the public hearing, determine which plan it considers most 
beneficial to the Town, and applicants shall, also prior to the close of the 
public hearing, elect which plan they wish to pursue, and shall inform the 
Planning Board of their choice in writing. 

d. Special Permit Decision: The Planning Board may approve, approve with 
conditions, or deny an application for a VDP after having determined if the 
VDP better promotes the purposes of this Section IX.L and Section XIJ.2 
(Special Permit Criteria) than would a conventional development on the same 
site. 

e. Definitive Plan: If the Planning Board approves a VDP Special Permit, the 
applicant shall then submit a definitive subdivision plan to the Planning Board 
under the Ipswich Subdivision Rules and Regulations, unless such plan was 
approved at the same time as the VDP Special Permit. If there is substantial 
variation between the definitive plan and the development described in the 
VDP Concept Plan and Special Permit Application, the Planning Board shall 
determine whether a public hearing must be held on the modifications to the 
Concept Plan."; and 

amend subsection I. of "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS" as follows: 



■ revise 2.b., first sentence, by adding, before "RRA, RRB, and RRC Districts", the 
"VI" District; 

■ revise 3.b., first sentence, by adding, before "RRA or RRB Districts", the "VI" 
District; 

■ revise 3.c, first sentence, by adding, before "RRA and RRB Districts", the "VI" 
District; 



68 



MAP FOR ARTICLE 10 



Village Incentive Zoning: 

Rezone Portion of RRA District to VI District 




Data compiled from airphotos 
taken April 1998 

Map prepared by: 

Ipswich Planning and Development 

June 2003 




■ revise 5.c, 3rd sentence, by deleting "two hundred percent (200%)" and 
substituting in lieu thereof "three hundred percent (300)%"; and 

2) Amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by rezoning a portion of the 
"Rural Residence A (RRA)" District to the "Village Incentive (VI)" District as shown 
on a map entitled 'Village Incentive Zoning: Rezone Portion of RRA District to VI 
District', dated July, 2003; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich and the Official Zoning Map as 
presented in Article 10 of the Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting. 
Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Open Space Committee unanimously 
recommended. Finance Committee voted 6 to 1 in favor. 

Several voters spoke in favor and against the motion. Mr. Allen responded to questions 
from the voters on related issues. The question was moved and so voted. The voice vote 
on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 151 in favor and 115 against, the 
motion failed the required 2/3 majority vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by revising "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS , B. Table 
of Dimensional and Density Regulations" as follows: 

> Within the "Intown Residence" row, for the use "Single-family detached", add a 
footnote "28." to the value "10,000", said footnote to read as follows: 

"28. For lots held separately or combined with an adjoining lot or lots, which conform 
to the original subdivision layout, have at least 5,000 square feet of area and at least 
fifty feet of street frontage, and upon which no house has been built, the minimum 
square footage requirement for a detached single-family dwelling may be reduced by 
50% by special permit from the Planning Board, provided that the proposed dwelling 
(a) does not exceed 2,000 square feet of floor area; (b) satisfies all of the dimensional 
requirements of the Intown Residence (ER) District, except that the minimum lot 
width and front yard setback requirements shall be fifty feet and ten feet, respectively; 
and (c) is made permanently affordable as defined in and accordance with IX. I. of this 
zoning bylaw. In lieu of making the dwelling unit permanently affordable, the 
applicant may pay a fee to the Town to provide affordable housing in Ipswich, 
pursuant to paragraph 3.(2) in IX. I. For any lot located within a National Register 
Historic District, the Planning Board, in addition to applying the special permit 
general conditions described in XI.J. of this bylaw, shall review the special permit 
application in accordance with the following criterion: the proposed structure, in 

70 



terms of design, setting, massing, scale, materials and setbacks, shall be consistent 
with the architectural character of the street within the historic district."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich and the Official Zoning Map as 
presented in Article 11 of the Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting, 
with the following revision: amend proposed footnote 28., sub-paragraph (b), by adding, 
after the words "affordable housing in Ipswich," the following words: "in the amount of 
$50,000. The fee may be adjusted by the Planning Board from time to time by the 
issuance of guidelines or regulations". Seconded. 

Planning Board unanimously in favor; Finance Committee voted 6 to 1 in favor and the 
Board of Selectmen voted one in favor and three against. 

Mr. Allen responded to questions from the voters. The voice vote on the motion was 
inconclusive. On a hand count with 136 in favor and 28 against, the motion passed the 
required 2/3 majority vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to: 

(1) amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

amend IV. ZONING DISTRICTS by revising "A. Type of Districts" as follows: delete 
"6. Business (B) District" and substitute in lieu thereof "6. General Business (GB) 
District"; add, in the correct numerical order, "7. Central Business (CB) District"; and 
renumber "8." through "14", accordingly; and 

revise "B. Intent of Districts " by 

• amending the description of the Business District in "4." by deleting the language 
in its entirety and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"4. The General Business District is intended primarily for retail, trade, 
service, and other commercial uses with some compatible light industrial 
uses. Multi-family residential uses may be permitted. The District is 
generally served by municipal water supply and sewerage facilities."; and 

• adding, in the correct numerical order, "5. Central Business District (CB) 
District", to read as follows: 

"5. The Central Business (CB) District is intended primarily to 
accommodate a composite of business and retail uses, multi-family 

71 



residential uses, office uses, and institutional uses, all of which comprise 
the Town's central core. The district is served by municipal water supply 
and sewerage facilities." 

• renumbering "6." through "11." accordingly; and 
amend V. USE REGULATIONS, Table of Use Regulations, by 

• revising the column heading "B" by changing it to "GB", but keeping the same 
prohibitions and allowances currently shown in the table, with the following 
exception: after "Formula fast food establishments. . .", change SPB to "-"; 

• Adding, after the "GB" column, the "CB" column, and by assigning it the same 
prohibitions and allowances shown under the "B" column, with the following 
exceptions: for "Establishment selling and/or renting new and/or used 
automobiles...", change "SPB" to "-"; for "Establishment for repair and/or 
service of new and/or used automobiles...", change "SPB" to "-"; for "shopping 
center", change "P" to "SPB"; for "Enclosed construction uses including 
materials and equipment storage and supplies", change "SBA" to "-"; for 
"Bakery, laundry, or dry cleaning plant", change "P" to "SBA"; for "Keeping, 
raising, and breeding of farm animals.... on one acre or more", change from "P" 
to "SBA"; for "Keeping, raising, and breeding of farm animals.... on less than 
one acre", change from "SBA" to "-"; and 

• Revising the principal use "Bakery, laundry, or dry cleaning plant" by adding, 
before the word "Bakery", the words "Non-retail"; after the word "Laundry", the 
word "plant"; and by rephrasing the use description so that it reads as follows: 
"Laundry plant, dry cleaning plant, or non-retail bakery"; and 

amend "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS by 

revising B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations, as follows: 

• under "District", change "Business (B)" to "(CB)" but keep the same 
dimensional requirements shown in the table under that column; 

• under "District", after "Central Business (CB)" and before "Highway 
Business (HB)", add the "General Business (GB) District", assigning the 
dimensional requirements shown under the CB District, with the following 
exception: change the frontage setback from "0 24 " feet to "io 28 " feet, and 
add the footnote "28.", said footnote to be placed in the correct numerical 
sequence under FOOTNOTES TO TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND 
DENSITY REGULATIONS, and to read as follows: "28. A principal 
building may be constructed to a front setback of less than ten (10) feet if 
granted an exception by Planning Board special permit."; and 

• within " Accessory Buildings and Structures" under "District", change 

72 



"Business (B)" to "(CB)" but keep the same dimensional requirements 
shown in the table under that column; under "District", after "Central 
Business (CB)" and before "Highway Business (HB)", add the "General 
Business (GB) District", assigning the dimensional requirements as shown 
under the CB District; and 

• under FOOTNOTES TO TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY 
REGULATIONS, amend Footnote "9." By deleting the word "business" 
from the first and second sentence and in each instance substituting in lieu 
thereof "Central Business (CB) District"; and 

revising "G. Other General Dimensional and Density Requirements, 3." by deleting 
the words "a Business" and substituting in lieu thereof the words "the Central 
Business or General Business"; and 

amend "VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS ", "I. 

Municipal Parking Lot Exemption" as follows: 

• Revise the first sentence by deleting the phrase "Except for business uses 
which occupy more than 12,000 square feet of space or are located in 
buildings constructed after September 1, 1994," and by adding, after the 
phrase "business uses need not provide off-street parking if they are located", 
the words "in the Central Business District or"; and 

• Delete the second and third sentences in their entirety; and 
amend "Vm. SIGNS , D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District" as follows: 

• under paragraph "3.", delete the words "In Highway Business, Planned 
Commercial, and Business Districts, but not including those Business Districts 
covered in paragraph 4. below," and substitute in lieu thereof the following: 
"In Highway Business and Planned Commercial Districts,"; and 



• 



under paragraph "4 .", delete the words "In Business and Industrial-zoned 
Districts within the center of Ipswich (Lord Square, Washington Street, 
Downtown Business District, and South Main Street)" and substitute in lieu 
thereof "In the Central Business and General Business Districts,"; and 

amend "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS , G. Wireless Communications Facilities, under 
Wireless Communication District B , by deleting the word "Business" and substituting in 
lieu thereof "Central Business"; and 

(2) amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by renaming the "B" District 
as "GB" and by mapping the CB District as shown on the attached map; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

73 



MAP FOR ARTICLE 12 




74 



Article l 2j- Rezoning 
31 Locust Road 



Data layers compiled from 
Airphoto! token April 1998 




75 



Planning Board member Michael Ryan moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich and the Official Zoning Map as 
presented in Article 12 of the Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting. 
Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by 2/3 majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich 
by rezoning 31 Locust Road, further identified as Lot 44 on Assessor's Map 21, from 
Rural Residence A (RRA) to Industrial (I), as shown on the attached map; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Timothy Purinton moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by rezoning 31 Locust Road, further 
identified as Lot 44 on Assessor's Map 21, from Rural Residence A (RRA) to Industrial 
(I), as shown on the map attached to this Article 13 on the Warrant for the October 20, 
2003, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by revising "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS B. Table 
of Dimensional and Density Regulations", as follows: 

• Under the "minimum lot area" column, for the "multi-family use and the "Mixed 
Residential/business use" in the "Business" District, place the footnote "11" on 
the allowed minimum lot area; 

• Under the "FOOTNOTES TO TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY 
REGULATIONS FOOTNOTES", revise Footnote "11." by: 

> Deleting, from the second sentence, the words "may include, but not be 
limited to, providing low and moderate income housing" and substituting 
in lieu thereof "shall mean affordable housing as defined in IX. I. of this 

bylaw"; 

> Deleting the third and fourth sentences in their entirety, and substituting in 
lieu thereof the following: "Under no circumstances shall the Planning 
Board waive the density and dimensional requirements to exceed 5,000 
square feet plus 2,000 square feet per unit in overall density for multi- 

76 



family, and 3,000 square feet plus 1,500 square feet in overall density for 
mixed residential/business use.; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 14 of the 
Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by 2/3 majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS "H. Great Estate Preservation 
Development (GEPD)" as follows: 

• Amend "2. Permitted Uses, f." by deleting in its entirety the two sentences under 
"(1)" and substituting in lieu thereof the following: "(1) No more than 50% of the 
units may contain more than two bedrooms, and none of the units shall contain 
more than three bedrooms;" 

• Amend "3. Density Standards, b. Floor Area of Development:, (2) Additional 
Floor Space for Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings", by adding a new sentence 
after the first sentence, said sentence to read as follows: "If the Planning Board 
determines that the reconstruction or replacement of an existing building is more 
consistent with IX.H.l. than the building's rehabilitation or renovation, then the 
Applicant may increase new floor space by five square feet for every one square 
feet of floor space to be replaced or reconstructed." 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 15 of the 
Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 18 against and 109 
in favor, the motion carried by the required 2/3 majority vote. 

ARTICLE 16 



77 



To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by: 

(1) amending "II. APPLICABILITY , B. Nonconforming Uses and Structures" by adding 
a paragraph "7.", to read as follows: 

"7. Compliance with Other Special Permit Requirements. The granting of a special 
permit for expanding or altering nonconforming uses or nonconforming structures other 
than single and two family structures as authorized herein does not supersede any other 
special permit requirements for such use or structure as indicated in the Table of Use 
Regulations or elsewhere in this bylaw."; and 

(2) amending "IE. DEFINITIONS" by revising the definition of "STORY" as follows: 
After the word "That", add the word "habitable", so that the definition as amended reads 
as follows: "That habitable portion of a building between the upper surface of a floor and 
the upper surface of the floor or roof next above. A basement shall be considered a story 
if it meets the definition of 'story above grade' as defined in 780CMR 502.0"; and 

(3) amending " SECTION V. USE SCHEDULE, Table of Use Regulations ", as follows: 

Within said Table under the heading ACCESSORY, add the use "Offices customary to a 
principal commercial or industrial use allowed in the district", and inserting a "P" under 
the "B", "HB", "PC", "I", and "LI" columns, and a "-" under the remaining columns; 

Within said Table under the heading Commercial, for the use "Personal & consumer 
service establishment", change the allowance in the PC District from "SBA" to "SBA 24 "; 
and under FOOTNOTES TO USE REGULATIONS, add footnote "24.", said footnote to 
read as follows: "24. Except that a personal consumer establishment shall not require a 
special permit if it is 1,000 square feet in size or less."; and 

(4) amending "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS , B. Table of 
Dimensional and Density Regulations" as follows: 

In the "Intown Residence" District, for the use "Multi-family, under the "Minimum Lot 
Area" column, add, after "9,000", the words "for first dwelling unit" and after "5,000/DU 
add the word "thereafter"; 

In the "Highway Business" District, for the use "Multi -family, under the "Minimum Lot 
Area" column, add, after "25,000", the words "for first dwelling unit" and after 
"5,000/DU" add the word "thereafter"; 

In the "Business" District, for the use "Multi-family, under the "Minimum Lot Area" 
column, add, after "5000", the words "for first dwelling unit" and after "2,500/DU add 
the word "thereafter"; and for the use "Mixed Residential/Business Use", under the 
"Minimum Lot Area" column, add, after "3,000", the words "for first dwelling unit" and 
after "2,000/DU add the word "thereafter"; and 



78 



(5) amending " IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS , A. Open Space Preservation (Cluster) 
Zoning (OSPZ), 5. Development Requirements" as follows: 

• amend "c. Open Space Restriction" by deleting the first sentence of the last 
paragraph in its entirely and substituting in lieu thereof the following sentence: 
"In designating open space, the Applicant shall apply guidelines entitled 
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING OPEN SPACE , adopted by the Planning Board 
and amended from time to time"; and 



• 



amend "e. Application and Review Process" by deleting the first sentence of the 
third paragraph in its entirety.; and 



(6) amending "XL ADMINISTRATION, K. Variances," by adding, after the second 
sentence, the following sentence: "Such a variance, however, shall not supersede any 
special permit requirements for a use or activity as indicated in the Table of Use 
Regulations or elsewhere in this bylaw"; 

or take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 16 of the 
Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting, with the following 
modification: delete proposed revision "(2)" in its entirety, and renumber proposed 
revisions "(3)" to "(6)' accordingly. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire an interest in 
fee (or lesser interest) in land now or formerly of Gladys Carter, 12 Fowlers Lane 
(Assessors Map 30B, Parcel 42), consisting of approximately 31.6 acres, for wastewater 
treatment purposes, or for general municipal purposes; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire said parcel by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; 
(3) to authorize the Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend without further 
appropriation any federal and/or state grants pertaining to said acquisition; and (4) to 
raise said appropriation by transfer from available funds and/or by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee voted unanimously in favor of indefinite 
postponement. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



79 



ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 21 of the April 06, 
1999, Annual Town Meeting, as most recently amended by Article 20 of the October 20, 
2002, Special Town Meeting (White Lion Sewer Bonds) by determining that the project 
expenditures shall be recovered by sewer betterment using a "per unit method" of 
calculation based on current dwelling units (or dwelling unit equivalents) plus potential 
dwelling units allowable under current conventional zoning; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Board of Sewer Commissioners) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 21 of the April 06, 1999 Annual Town Meeting, as most recently amended by 
Article 20 of the October 20, 2002 Special Town Meeting (White Lion Sewer Bonds) by 
determining that the project expenditures shall be recovered by sewer betterment using a 
"per unit method" of calculation based on current dwelling units (or dwelling unit 
equivalents) plus potential dwelling units allowable under current conventional zoning. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote to: 

(1) accept the 2003 Ipswich Community Development Plan, adopted by the Planning 
Board on July 24, 2003 and the Board of Selectmen on September 15, 2003, as 
the planning strategy for the Town of Ipswich, with the understanding that the 
Plan shall be updated and presented to Town Meeting for acceptance no sooner 
than five years and no later than ten years from this date; 

(2) amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XI. GENERAL 
ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, by adding a new " Section 11. ", to read as 
follows: 

" Section 11. Conformance with Community Development Plan 
When taking actions and/or making decisions relative to land use or other 
subjects addressed by the 2003 Community Development Plan (CDP), 
Town boards and commissions shall indicate in their decisions and/or 
minutes whether or not said action or decision was, in their opinion, 
consistent with the CDP. If a Board or Commission indicates that its 
action or decision is consistent with the CDP, then it shall also provide its 
reason for such determination in its decision and/or minutes. If a Board or 
Commission indicates that its action or decision is not consistent with the 



80 



CDP, then it shall explain its rationale for taking such action in its decision 
and/or minutes."; and 

(3) authorize the Town Manager to appoint a "Community Development Plan 

Implementation Task Force", comprised of at least five persons but no more than 
nine, for the purpose of advocating for and monitoring compliance with the CDP. 
Said task force shall have a tenure of one year, subject to extension by Town 
Meeting, and shall report its findings to the Special Town Meeting in Fall 2004; 
or take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to accept the 2003 Community Development Plan, adopted by the Planning Board 
on July 24, 2003 and the Board of Selectmen on September 15, 2003, as the 
planning strategy for the Town of Ipswich; 

(2) amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XL GENERAL 
ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, by adding a new " Section 11. ", to read as 
follows: 

" Section 11. Conformance with Community Development Plan 
When taking actions and/or making decisions relative to land use or other 
subjects addressed by the 2003 Community Development Plan (CDP), 
Town boards and commissions shall indicate in their decisions and/or 
minutes whether or not said action or decision was, in their opinion, 
consistent with the CDP. If the Board or Commission indicates that their 
action or decision is consistent with the CDP, then they shall also provide 
their reason for such determination in their decision and/or minutes. If the 
Board or Commission indicates that their action or decision is not 
consistent with the CDP, then they shall explain their rationale for taking 
such action in their decision and/or minutes. The failure of a Board or 
Commission to satisfy the requirements of this Section 1 1 shall not in and 
of itself invalidate the decision to which it pertains."; and 

(3) to authorize the Town Manager to appoint a "Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force", comprised of at least five persons but no more than 
nine, for the purpose of advocating for and monitoring compliance with the CDP. 
Said task force shall have a tenure of one year, subject to extension by Town 
Meeting, and shall report its findings to the Special Town Meeting in the fall of 
2004. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Open Space Committee unanimously in favor. 
Finance Committee voted majority in favor with one abstention. 

Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

81 



ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote: 

a) to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, "CHAPTER XI GENERAL 
ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS", Section 3. Conveyances of Land ", paragraph (c), 
by adding after the words "open space preservation", the words "and affordable housing", 
so that the said paragraph, as amended, shall read as follows: "(c) The Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to accept in the name of the Town gifts of restrictive covenants 
on the use of land for open space preservation and affordable housing purposes."; and 

b) to authorize the Town to accept the affordable housing restrictive covenant on three 
rental units at 19 Depot Square (Assessors Map 41B, Lot 298), executed on April 22, 
2003, and recorded at the Essex South District Registry of Deeds on May 2, 2003, Book 
20728, Page 189; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: 

(a) to amend The General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 20(a) 
of the Warrant for the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting; and 

(b) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept an affordable housing restriction 
encumbering the rental units of the property located at 19 Depot Square (Assessors 
Map 41B, Lot 298), as described in Article 20(b) of the Warrant for the October 20, 
2003, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, 
CHAPTER XVI PROCEDURE FOR DELAYING THE DEMOLITION OF 
HISTORICALLY OR ARCHITECTURALLY SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS", " Section 
C. Procedure " by replacing the words "six months" with the words "twelve months" in 
the following places: 

paragraph "7." in the fourth line; and paragraph "8. (b)" in the first and fifth lines, so that 
said paragraphs, as amended, shall respectively read as follows: 

"7. Upon such determination by the Commission, the Commission shall so advise the 
applicant and the Building Inspector, in hand or by certified mail, within twenty- 
one days of the conduct of the hearing, and no demolition permit may be issued 
until twelve months after the date of such determination by the Commission, 
except under the conditions of paragraph 8 of this subsection." ; and 



82 



"8. (b) the Commission is satisfied that, for at least twelve months, the owner has 
made continuing, bona fide, and reasonable efforts to locate a purchaser to 
preserve, rehabilitate, and restore the subject building, and that such efforts 
have been unsuccessful. These efforts would include listing the building with 
a realtor or realtors for the twelve months, advertising in local general 
circulation newspapers, and advertising in one Boston general circulation 
newspaper."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Historical Commission) 

Historical Commission member John Moss moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XVI PROCEDURE FOR 
DELAYING THE DEMOLITION OF HISTORICALLY OR ARCHITECTURALLY 
SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS," " Section C. Procedure " by replacing the words "six 
months" with the words "twelve months" in paragraph "7." In the fourth line, so that said 
paragraph, as amended, shall read as follows: 

"7. Upon such determination by the Commission, the Commission shall so 
advise the applicant and the Building Inspector, in hand or by certified 
mail, within twenty-one days of the conduct of the hearing, and no 
demolition permit may be issued until twelve months after the date of 
such determination by the Commission, except under the conditions of 
paragraph 8 of this subsection." 
Seconded. 

Historical Commission and Board of Selectmen voted unanimously in favor. Finance 
Committee voted five against and one in favor. Planning Board unanimously opposed. 

Voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. Seven voters stood and questioned the voice 
vote. On a hand count with 62 in favor and 95 against, the motion failed to pass. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, acting as Electric 
Commissioners, to sell and grant, for a minimum price of $1.00 and upon such terms and 
conditions as the Board of Selectmen shall determine to be appropriate, an easement to 
Massachusetts Electric Company, a Massachusetts corporation having an address at 55 
Bearfoot Road, Northborough, Massachusetts 01532, for the installation, operation and 
maintenance of capacitor banks and related electrical equipment, in the area of 276 High 
Street (Assessors Map 20D, Parcel 8), said easement to be substantially in the form of a 
draft easement instrument and as shown on an easement plan, both of which are on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk; or to take any action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: 
Electric Commissioners) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
acting as Electric Commissioners, to sell and grant, for a minimum price of $1.00 and 

83 



upon such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen shall determine to be 
appropriate, an easement to Massachusetts Electric Company, a Massachusetts 
corporation having an address at 55 Bearfoot Road, Northborough, Massachusetts 01532, 
for the installation, operation and maintenance of capacitor banks and related electrical 
equipment, in the area of 276 High Street (Assessors Map 20D, Parcel 8), said easement 
to be substantially in the form of a draft easement instrument and as shown on an 
easement plan, both of which documents are on file in the office of the Town Clerk. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles raising and/or 
appropriating money contained in this warrant for the purpose of completing a budget 
which is balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2 l /z, so 
called; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended indefinite 
postponement. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn the Special Town Meeting was seconded and carried by unanimous 
voice vote. The meeting was adjourned at 10:13 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the Post 
Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, and by publication at least fourteen 
(14) days prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, or 
having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this twenty-ninth day of September in the year of our Lord, Two 
Thousand and Three. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James W. Foley 
Patrick J. McNally 
James R. Engel 
Harry Lampropoulos 
Edward B. Rauscher 



8^ 



*■*■***•*•** 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James W. Foley, Chair 

The year 2003 was a year of both restraint and creativity 
for the Board of Selectmen. The Town experienced local aid 
cuts by State government that prompted the Board to 
implement budget reductions and the elimination of capital 
improvement projects. Fiscal matters that impacted all 
Town departments were dealt with efficiently and 
expeditiously. A charter amendment that allowed transfer 
of funds between departments, year- end budget reversions 
and savings in the Town insurance budget assisted local 
government with a very difficult task. New private 
projects such as Turner Hill and New England Biolabs 
allowed a new growth scenario for the Town. 

The Board of Selectmen dealt with personnel administration 
matters in cooperation with the Town Manager. A review of 
the Early Retirement Incentive Program, Group Health 
Insurance issues, collective bargaining outlines, and a 
five percent cost shift for health insurance occurred 
during the past year. As Electric Light Commissioners, the 
Board dealt with a review of the operation of the municipal 
power plant. The future of the facility and configuration 
of personnel are being examined for structural changes in 
power production and purchase power agreements. The Water 
Department has begun the process of planning for 
distribution system upgrades and Filtration Plant 
improvements in 2004. 

The Town has dealt with a series of facility issues in the 
past year. The sale of the Memorial Building, the 
renovation of the former Town Hall Annex for affordable 
elderly housing, and the ongoing negotiations with the 
State over the future of the Ipswich District Court all 
took considerable time and effort. The Public Safety 
Facility Committee continued to examine sites for a new 
public safety facility to deal with an aging and obsolete 
central fire headquarters. 

In areas of public safety, the Town signed a new contract 
with Lyons Ambulance Service for an extended three-year 
period. The Police Department entered a mutual aid pact 
with surrounding police departments to deal with liability 
and jurisdictional issues. The Fire Department placed a new 



85 



1500 GPM pumper truck in service at Central Fire 
Headquarters and await the arrival of a new squad truck in 
2004. The Department was successful in the area of both 
State and Federal Grant Programs . Training, public 
education, homeland security and equipment were all areas 
that Ipswich received funding. 

The Town continued in areas of roadway and sidewalk 
reconstruction, stormwater management, strategic plan 
updates and open space stewardship. The importance of 
these long-term projects is vital for continued growth in 
today's municipal government environment. 

I wish to express my deep appreciation to all departments, 
boards and commissions for their cooperation and dedication 
to the Town and its citizens. 

TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 

The year 2003 could best be ascribed as one of "hunkering 
down and riding out the storm" of fiscal adversity. In 
early January, Governor Romney sought 9C authority and 
received approval thereof from the General Court, upon 
which he immediately implemented mid-year cuts in local 
aid, a vital part of our revenue budget for FY 2003. To 
address this course of events, we sequestered funds and 
relied on traditional year-end reversions to cover the 
municipal share (about $83,000) of revenue shortfalls. We 
constructed a FY2004 budget based on deeper cuts in local 
aid, which materialized and prompted further mid-course 
budget reductions at the special town meeting in October. 

Part of the fallout from the fiscal adversity with which we 
have been coping has been that there are no collective 
bargaining units under agreement for FY2004 and thereafter; 
and there has been virtually no discretionary capital 
outlay funded within the municipal operation budget. We've 
managed to cover service on existing debt, to maintain a 
modest roadway reclamation and paving program, and to 
replace one police cruiser through scheduled capital 
expenditures . 

Other activities in finance administration included use for 
the first time of the new charter amendment that enabled us 
to transfer funds between departments and categories at 



86 



year-end to cover shortfalls; that financial tool was handy 
in covering a substantial overrun in the snow and ice 
control budget. We achieved $8,000 savings in our FY04 
insurance budget because of concerted efforts by staff and 
citizen boards in undertaking loss control measures 
recommended by MIIA. Finance Director Rita Negri completed 
her first set of financial documents for an audit in 
compliance with the new GASB-34 standard, including 
depreciation of fixed assets. And as town manager I 
developed several scenarios on projected "new growth" levy 
capacity we may anticipate receiving as a result of the 
Turner Hill and New England Biolabs developments. 

In the personnel sphere, extended review of the Early 
Retirement Incentive program was undertaken, together with 
a review of whether the Board of Selectmen should accept a 
coalition bargaining statute for group health insurance. 
The Board decided against acceptance of both initiatives. 
The Town agreed to fund a 5% cost shift for health 
insurance, commencing in FY2004, and to bargaining with the 
unions over the terms of its implementation. In late fall, 
as a cooperative effort of the Town, the Utilities 
department, and the Schools, a consultant was hired to 
assist in negotiating improved health insurance rates and 
to suggest ways in which the Town's and its employees' 
health dollars could be expended more effectively. We 
implemented the new HIPAA policies, a new callout procedure 
for electric distribution staff, and placed employee leave 
accruals on the payroll module. 

Our plant and facilities initiative saw some changes in 
2003 as well. Director Joe Lucido was hired in March. In 
addition to updating the Town Hall project punch list, he 
oversaw installation of acoustical ceiling treatment in the 
several meeting rooms, replaced the water and sewer 
services in the Old Town Hall, and analyzed changes to our 
building security systems. The Memorial Building was sold, 
finally, in late fall. And the ZBA granted a Comprehensive 
(40B) Permit to the North Shore Housing Trust for 
development of affordable elderly housing in the Annex 
adjacent to the town hall on Green Street. 

Public Safety and the Judiciary also could be ascribed as 
undergoing some transitional pressures in this turbulent 
fiscal climate. The override to fund expenses to train all 
police and fire personnel to become EMT-qualif ied was 
unsuccessful. The future of the District Court in Ipswich 



87 



became very much in doubt. Cost estimates were presented to 
the Selectmen from Hamilton, Wenham, and Topsfield for what 
it would take to cover Ipswich' s costs to maintain the Old 
Town Hall for the Court, if the Court were to continue 
beyond FY04. 

The Public Safety Facilities Subcommittee evaluated the 
feasibility of the Elm Street/South Main Street campus for 
a possible new fire headquarters, in which the Police would 
move into the old town hall and the existing police station 
would be demolished for parking. As the aged Central Fire 
Station experiences accelerating structural deterioration, 
the impetus to pursue this alternative seemed to grow. Two 
other events occurred: the police entered into a mutual aid 
agreement; and a new contract was signed with Lyons 
Ambulance service, recognizing the changes in operations 
since the closure of the Cable Emergency Room. 

The Public Works, Utilities, and Planning directorates 
worked closely together this past year on several 
initiatives. Examples include the North Main Street 
improvements project, roadway and sidewalk projects, and 
water main replacement projects. A stormwater management 
plan was adopted, as was a Community Development Plan. Town 
staff inserted the comments from the Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee, and updated the Town's Strategic 
Plan as a bi-annual update exercise. 

A thank you is extended to the Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee, town staff, and to the citizenry for their 
support during this difficult year. 



88 




Fames Graf f urn was voted by his peers for the Employee 
Recognition Award for January 20 03 




.zaseth Dcrman received tne Employee Recognition Awa: 

•Tjt'I \r 1 n ^ 1 
uui.y <£. -j sj _> 



89 



**•*•*■*** 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - Charles D. Surpitski, Director 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief 
Peter A. Foote, Deputy Chief 

I am again pleased to report that our community remained 
relatively safe during 2003. As always, much of the credit 
and gratitude for this reality goes to the professionalism 
and dedication of our police offices and the willingness of 
citizens to become involved in keeping our community safe. 

During the past year the Department actively participated 
in the grant process and was successful in being awarded 
significant amounts of grant monies. Much of the training 
and innovative patrol strategies implemented as well as 
significant capital investments to the Department that 
allowed your police to meet crime and quality of life 
challenges are the direct results of these awards. Of 
significant note are trainings conducted in how to better 
manage crisis situation by training the entire department 
in the nationally recognized Incident Command System, 
training our officers to respond effectively to active 
shooter situations, and the emergency medical technician 
program. These are merely highlights of the extensive 
training done. Innovative patrol strategies implemented 
were bicycle and foot patrols, traffic "hot spot" patrols 
to reduce citizen complaints and accidents, and the 
availability of a domestic violence civilian advocate to 
assist victims of this crime. Crime mapping, medical aids 
and other incidents reported to the police were mapped 
using GIS technology and patterns identified. The School 
Resource Officer program continued to be recognized as a 
valuable asset to the school system as did a partnership 
with the YMCA and the Ipswich Middle School to implement a 
meaningful after school program. Capital improvements 
included the purchase of a command vehicle containing the 
physical and communications equipment necessary to manage 
any and all situations and a community notification system 
to notify residents of public safety emergencies. How and 
if it should be used for other citizen notifications is 
under review. 

The Department is also grateful for the support shown by 
the residents. In these difficult and uncertain times it is 



90 



important to remain vigilant and report unusual or 
suspicious incidents to the police. We recognize that the 
involvement of the citizenry is vital to the success of the 
police mission. While we need not be paranoid about 
potential incidents, we expect that the police be prepared 
to properly respond to any incident that may arise. What we 
have accomplished in training and capital improvements 
coupled with your support bring us closer to the goal of a 
crime free community prepared to meet any challenges it may 
encounter . 

Below are some of the statistics recorded by the 
Department : 

Alarms 873 Medical Aids 734 

Assaults 33 M/V Crashes 381 

Disturbances 209 Suspicious Activity 411 

Breaking and Entering 53 Arrests 168 

Domestic Disputes 224 Calls for Service 9,995 

******* 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Chief Henry Michalski, Jr. 

The Department responded to 2,575 requests for service, 
which shows an increase in responses over last year. 
Request for emergency services increased by 3 00 responses, 
bringing our response to 1,888 requests due to various 
emergency situations, included were 15 structure fires as 
well as 822 medical aid and rescue incidents (includes 110 
motor vehicle accidents) . The Fire Department response to 
the Linebrook area increased from 167 times to 202 
responses, which break down to 106 request for medical 
assistance, 34 motor vehicle accidents with personal injury 
and 62 fire related incidents. 

Fire Prevention continues to be active. Lieutenant Maker 
has conducted 687 various inspections throughout the 
community as well as taking care of the general 
administrative issues which fall under his job description. 
Fire prevention needs to be seriously looked at. The time 
has come to add an additional inspector to the division in 
order to complete necessary safety inspections and paper 
work. 



91 



Training continues to play an active part in Department 
activities also. During the past year, Department members 
both career and call attended numerous training classes, 
some of which were Department run and others that the 
Massachusetts Fire Academy sponsored. 

This has been a busy year with on-going concerns dealing 
with building, staffing and equipment issues. With that in 
mind; I would like to take this opportunity to welcome 
aboard three new members to the call force, Daniel Berry, 
Brian Cole, and Dennis Ryan. Ail three have attended 
Firefighter I one night a week and weekends for a period of 
five (5) months. The Firefighter I program is a new 
program being offered by the fire academy for newly 
appointed firefighters. Several openings still exist on 
the call force. Anyone interested in becoming a member of 
the call force should stop by fire headquarters and pick up 
an application so we can begin the process of appointment. 

The expectation of the modern fire department, like most 
government agencies, is to do more with less. Budgets, and 
subsequently the number of personnel, have not grown at a 
rate equal to local growth and demand for services. While 
no agency can staff at levels to handle all potential risks 
or demands, fire departments are measured by their ability 
to provide service in a timely manner. It is up to you the 
taxpayers of Ipswich to decide what level of emergency 
service you desire. The Ipswich Fire Department is 
comprised of a combination force utilizing both full time 
career fire fighters and part time call fire fighters. The 
staffing levels and diversity of the department requires 
personnel to be mult i -talented and dynamic to meet the 
goals and objectives of the Department. Our mission 
statement stares, "that the primary mission of the fire 
department is to protect the lives and property, through 
fire prevention, fire suppression, medical assistance, 
hazardous materials control, and terrorism mitigation to 
all who live, work or invest in the community." 

As in the past, I would like to extend my sincere thanks to 
all the department members both career and call for their 
efforts to improve the department through training 
evolutions as well as responses to various situations. I 
would also like to thank and other departments throughout 
the Town for their help throughout the year. 



92 



A special thanks needs to go out to the family members of 
the firefighters. Due to the number of hours of training 
required yearly, and responses to various emergencies, 
family members are often put in second place to emergency 
services. When you see a spouse or child of an emergency 
service person on the street, you should thank them for the 
giving of their time and protector to protect the general 
public in their times of distress. 

Remember that the Fire Department is always there to serve 
you in whatever situation you may encounter. Do not 
hesitate to call or stop by the station and ask questions 
and to see your tax dollar in operation. 

ANNIMAL CONTROL 

Harry Leno, Animal Control Officer 

Dyan Katz, Assistant Animal Control Officer 

In May of 2003, an open house was held for our new state- 
of-the-art animal shelter. This facility was built using 
the Town' s workforce for site preparation and the sanitary 
sewer connection. The remainder of the project was 
organized and constructed entirely with money raised by the 
Ipswich Humane Group. They organized many diverse fund 
raising activities to make this project a reality. The 
Department is truly indebted to the many volunteer 
organizers and workers as well as to the citizens of 
Ipswich for their monetary donations. 

The Department is also very grateful to the Ipswich Humane 
group for their day-to-day support in caring for the 
animals of Ipswich. This group is a well organized, tightly 
knit group of volunteers that has been in existence for the 
past 23 years. The townspeople should be extremely grateful 
for their vision of quality care for all creatures that 
reside in our community and for their anticipated future 
support . 

The past year brought two positive rabies incidents. Both 
of these incidents required medical intervention and 
follow-up. There were also two positive cases of West Nile 
Virus reported to the Department of Public Health. We will 
continue to work closely with local and state public health 
officials to monitor and control these diseases. As 
importantly, the Department will continue to educate the 



93 



citizenry on prevention strategies involving tne 
introduction and spread of these diseases to humans, 
domestic pets, and wild animals. 

The Department continued to stress in 2 003 the importance 
of high quality pet care which will improve the quality of 
community life in the long term. Proper adherence to animal 
issues and regulations such as the removal of dog wastes 
from public areas, vicious dogs, barking dogs, wildlife 
issues, and loose animals demanded a great deal of the time 
of our personnel and contributed to the diminishing of the 
quality of neighborhood life. 

Below are some of the incidents that the Department dealt 
with durinq 2003: 



Animals Adopted 
Animals Killed by M/V ; s 
Citations Issued 
Complaints received 
Complaints Investigated 



74 


Dog Licenses Issued 


1653 


158 


Multi License Issued 


65 


79 


Dogs Picked Up 


88 


3465 


Animals Found 


161 


3206 


Quarantine Orders 


96 




HARBORS DEPARTMENT 
Charles D. Surpitski, H 



*-***>r**>r 



>ormaster 



irles 3. Schwartz, Assistant Karbormast< 



Z'r.e Harbors Department is pleased to report tnat there were 
no major boating accidents during the 2003 beating season. 
Much of the credit for this belor.es to responsible boaters 



ana tne oreser.ee of our oo^ice oincers i: 



:ne oatro_ ooai 



94 



and on the Jet Ski in those areas most prone to congestion, 
competing use, and irresponsible behavior. 

The pump out boat continued to be a valuable asset to the 
cleanliness of our waterways. Approximately 3,050 gallons 
of boat waste was pumped by this craft and transported to a 
proper sewerage treatment facility. Our operation is 
closely coordinated with that of the Town of Rowley in 
order to have the greatest impact in Plum Island Sound and 
the Castle Neck River. This coordination adds both to the 
immediate availability of pump out services and the 
cleanliness of the waterways. Again this year, the service 
was funded through a grant and offered at no charge to 
boaters . 

There were a number of medical emergencies on the 
waterways, reports of irresponsible boating activity, minor 
crimes, and directed patrols that were handled by the 
officers manning the boat and/or Jet Ski. These issues 
continue to be of area of concern as the numbers of boats 
in our waterways continues to grow. We must remain vigilant 
in preventing irresponsible boaters and negative behaviors 
from impacting either safety or the ability to enjoy our 
waterways by all users. 

The Harbors Department has worked and continues to work 
closely with the Waterways Advisory Committee, the 
Massachusetts Public Access Board, and the Unites States 
Army Corps of Engineers to determine the feasibility or 
dredging the river and its maintenance once dredged. 

There were 674 mooring permits issued for the 2003 boating 
season and 198 seasonal launch permits. As in all past 
years, our waterways were visited by hundreds of transient 
boaters . 

********* 

SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Phil Kent, Shellfish Constable 

Commercial shell fisherman harvested 4,674 bushel of clams 
during 2003. This converts to approximately 233,750 pounds 
of shellfish. Although to many this may seem like a lot of 
clams, the state of the resource can best be described as 
poor during 2003. The Department is hopeful that the 
resource will rebound as in years past, but a definitive 



95 



answer by examining the flats for "seed" clams will remain 
elusive until the ice from our early winter recedes. 

Unfortunately there were 131 days when the clam flats were 
closed due to rainfall amounts exceeding acceptable limits. 
An additional 21 days were lost in June due to the arrival 
of the red tide. 

The following permits were issued: 

88 Commercial Shell fishing permits 
84 Non-Resident recreational permits 
69 Resident recreational permits 
122 Family recreational permits 

The Department continued to work closely with State 
agencies monitoring the water quality in our waterways. 

We are indeed fortunate to have such a natural resource in 
our town. We are confident that all the citizens will 
continue to support the careful stewardship of the 
shellfish treasure. The Department will continue to play 
its role in protecting the resource and ensuring that the 
rules are both known and obeyed. 

********* 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Charles H. Cooper, Director 

This past year marked my first as Emergency Management Director 
for the Town of Ipswich. It has been a challenge that I have 
thoroughly enjoyed, and I believe that we have accomplished a 

lot. 

During the first few months of the year, I completed several 
training courses in such topics as Terrorism Planning, Emergency 
Management Operations, Hurricane Preparedness, and attended 
meetings at the Region 1 Headquarters in Tewksbury, as well as 
the Local Emergency Planning Council meetings. 

We were fortunate to receive several grants from the State. One 
of these grants allowed us to update our Comprehensive Emergency 
Management Plan. We worked with personnel from Region 1 to bring 
our resource manual up to date. The appropriate sections of the 
CEMP were then distributed to the various Town departments. 



96 



We received a grant to start a Citizens Emergency Response Team. 
This program is being conducted in conjunction with the Town of 
Rowley. The training consists of eight two and one-half hour 
sessions and will provide residents with the necessary 
information and skills to assist the professional public safety 
personnel in the event of a major emergency. We currently have 
seven instructors for this program. Fire Chief Michalski should 
be given a lot of credit being instrumental in establishing this 
CERT program for Ipswich and Rowley. By the time you read this, 
we will have trained approximately 15 people to be responders . 
We anticipate receiving additional grant money this year to 
continue this program and train more of our residents. 

We also used grant money to update and expand our radio 
communications capability. We purchased and installed an Amateur 
Radio two-meter repeater at the public safety transmitter site. 
We have identified approximately twelve HAMS, in Ipswich and 
Rowley, who have expressed a desire to become part of an 
emergency communications team. This team will interface with the 
CERT team(s) and be able to provide reliable radio 
communication. Several of these HAMS have enrolled in the 
Amateur Radio Relay League Emergency Communications Courses. 
Using the new equipment, we now conduct monthly communications 
nets with area HAMS. I have also been participating in the MEMA 
monthly radio nets . 

Using materials from various sources, and with the generous help 
from the ELD, Rick Dorr, Joe Lucido and others, the photo lab in 
the Police Station was renovated into a limited Emergency 
Operations Center. Again using grant money, radio equipment was 
purchased, eliminating any gaps that previously existed in our 
public safety communications capability. We can now communicate 
with any and all local, state and federal agencies, using a 
variety of modes and frequencies. The new equipment also 
provides redundancy for the Public Safety Dispatch Center. 

A weather station was installed in the EOC with a remote 
display installed at the Public Safety Dispatch Center. 
Hopefully, over this year we will integrate this data into 
our Town website. We currently provide via the NWS Skywarn 
program, weather reports to NWS Taunton. 

In addition, we established several emergency talk-groups using 
the Nextel phones. These talk-groups were designated for use in 
a School Emergency, Town Emergency, or Public Safety Emergency. 
These talk-groups will facilitate instant inter-department 



97 



communication and coordination between key town personnel, 
wherever they may be, should an emergency occur. 

I anticipate building on the above programs in 2 004 to ensure 
that should a major event occur, whether natural or man-made, 
Ipswich will be ready and able to effectively deal with it. This 
year we will be offering a public training session in 
conjunction with the National Weather Service, Taunton Office 
for their "Skywarn" Weather Spotter Program. This session will 
run from 7-10 PM and will be held in the Performing Arts Center 
at the High & Middle Schools. We will be the only Essex County 
venue for Skywarn training this year. We will also be co- 
sponsoring along with the ARRL- Eastern Massachusetts Amateur 
Radio Emergency Services, an emergency communications workshop. 
This will be the only such training offered this year in eastern 
Massachusetts . 

•k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE - Robert C. Gravino, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Robert C. Gravino, Director 

The Public Works Department is a customer focused service 
organization, dedicated to maintaining and improving the 
Town' s infrastructure through the efforts of a professional 
work force. With that as our mission, DPW incorporates an 
on-going review of what we do and how we do it, with the 
intent of delivering high quality service to our customers 
and enhancing the quality of life in our diverse community. 
Customer focus, continuous process improvement, human 
resource development, and resource management are the keys 
to our success. 

Public Works accomplished or is working on the following 
items in support of our mission: 

• Prepared and implemented a Storm Water Management Plan 
to comply with the Phase II Storm Water Rule 
Regulations of the Federal Clean Water Act . 

• Created a link on the Town's Website that allows 
residents to report discrepancies and problems, or ask 
questions, using the Internet. Work requests are 
automatically generated for distribution to the DPW 
Division responsible for taking action. 



98 



• Developed and implemented Operation and Maintenance 
plans for water quality appurtenances that have been 
previously installed for storm water management. 

• Developing an expansion capacity analysis to determine 
the resources required for the DPW organization to 
bring fleet maintenance of all Town owned vehicles in- 
house . 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Norman Stone, Foreman 

A review of division operations was undertaken to determine 
the best utilization of personnel and equipment. In the 
warmer months, the focus of operations is on outdoor 
construction projects, where personnel skills and heavy 
equipment can produce significant infrastructure repairs 
and improvements to roads, sidewalks, and catch basins. A 
work order system was introduced to better schedule 
assignments when weather or personnel availability 
precludes accomplishment of major jobs. 

Pleasant Street and Broadway Avenue were reclaimed and 
repaved, and sidewalks on Pleasant, Broadway, and Topsfield 
Road were reconstructed. A stretch of 3.5 miles of 
Topsfield Road, from the Topsfield Town Line to Farley 
Avenue, were overlaid with 1-H inches of hot top. Roadway 
paving (1-H inch overlay) was done on Plains Road (1,250 
feet starting at Old Right Road), Old Right Road (1,600 
feet starting at Route 1), Linebrook Road (2,100 feet, 
Boxford Town Line to Boxford Road) , West Street (72 feet) , 
Blaisdell Terrace, and Cleveland Avenue. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

John Adams, Forestry Leader 

A portion of the Forestry budget is funded by the Utilities 
Department as reimbursement for the line clearing that 
Forestry does for the Electric Division. A significant 
percentage of the line clearing performed this year dealt 
with new utility construction for Turner Hill and the New 
England BioLabs facility on Route 1A. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 
Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 

No new or replacement vehicles or large equipment were 
purchased this year. Closer inspection and additional 



99 



preventive maintenance of vehicles should help extend the 
service life and stabilize maintenance costs of our DPW 
fleet. 

TRANSFER STATION 

On April 30, 2 003, the Transfer Station stopped accepting 
trash, metals, recyclables, white goods, televisions and 
cathode ray tubes, and car batteries, and tires. Operations 
were also reduced from five days a week to Wednesdays and 
Saturdays, 8:00 AM until 3:30 PM. The Transfer Station now 
accepts yard waste only, specifically grass clippings, 
leaves, brush, and small branches. Reduced operations at 
the Transfer Station are a result of increasing costs to 
the Town, the costly duplication of Town funded curbside 
and Transfer Station disposal of trash and recyclables, and 
environmental issues related to the handling of metals and 
other items at the Transfer Station' s location on Town Farm 
Road. White goods, electrical appliances, and TV's and 
computer monitors are now disposed of curbside by the 
Town's trash contractor through the purchase of a $25 
sticker, available at the Public Works office in Town Hall. 
The full-time Transfer Station operator position was 
eliminated; and the Transfer Station is now manned by a 
member of the Highway Division. 

The DPW-sponsored quarterly paint collections now accept 
car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, and tires as a result of 
the reduced operations at the Transfer Station. The 
November 2003 quarterly collection was held for the first 
time in conjunction with the Health Department's Household 
Hazardous Waste Collection Day to better serve Town 
residents . 

SANITATION 

With the reduced operations at the Transfer Station, the 
costs to dispose of recyclables and the amount of trash per 
household have decreased, as both are now only picked up 
curbside by the Town's trash contractor. Recyclables 
previously dropped off at the Transfer Station were 
assessed a fee to be hauled away, while recyclables picked 
up curbside are covered under a flat fee schedule. 

DPW takes every opportunity to educate residents that each 
pound of recyclable material that is diverted from the 
trash stream is a reduction in our costs, since the Town is 



00 



charged a fixed fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping 
fee for every pound of trash. 

SNOW AND ICE OPERATIONS 

The winter of 2002/2003 was a long and harsh one for the 
Town employees who worked to keep the roads and public 
sidewalks safe and passable during the winter months. The 
cost for snow and ice operations exceeded the budgeted 
amount by $138,000, an amount slightly greater than that in 
the account appropriation. 




Sidewalks in close proximity to schools became a high 
priority for snow removal due to the reduction in students 
being transported by the Town's bus contractor and the 
resultant increase in students walking to school. 



***■**•*** 



PLANT & FACILITIES OPERATIONS 

Joseph T. Lucido, Director 

Although it was created in 2001, the Facilities Department 
has made some significant strides in maintaining the 
facilities which the Town operates out of on a daily basis. 
The Department is responsible for the maintenance and upkeep 
of the Town Hall and Annex, the Police Station and associated 
facilities, the Central and Linebrook Fire Stations, the 
Public Library, the Ipswich District Courthouse, all of the 
Public Works facilities, Ipswich High/Middle School, Winthrop 



101 



Elementary School, Doyon Elementary School, the Payne 
Administration Building, and the Utilities Department 
facilities. In the summer of 2 03, the Memorial Hall was 
sold, and we turned the keys over. 

The Department has overseen some large projects in 2 03 and 
has completed some smaller projects. We oversaw and managed 
the application of the finish coat cf paving a: the High 
School/Middle School. Also managed the completion of a few 
loose ends to the HS/MS Construction Project. We have 
completed 75% of the lighting for the Tennis Courts. The 
Department was also responsible for oversight of the Winthrop 
School roof replacement and boiler replacement projects. In 
2003, we oversaw the completion of the new rubber- flooring 
surface in the gymnasium at Winthrop School . We have 
completed minor electrical upgrades to the Winthrop School, 
similar to what was done at Doyon in 2002. 

On the Town side, we are continuing to work through the 
contingency detail sheet for the new Town Hall building which 
saw the installation of the acoustical ceiling spray applied 
to Meeting Rooms A, B and C along with the Council on Aging 
and Recreation Department Common Room. There were also a 
handful of smaller items on the list that were completed by 
in-house personnel. The Police Station has had somewhat of a 
facelift in the painting of some of the interior rooms and 
holding cells. The fire station had a new overhead door 
installed to accommodate the new Engine 3 . We discovered 
some problems with the north wall of the Fire Station and 
hope to have it repaired in 2004. We also assisted in 
replacing some of the corroded doors at the Water Treatment 
Facility and did sore needed repairs to the controls of the 
HVAC system in the lab of the Wastewater Treatment Facility. 
We also replaced the old clay Sewer Service from the District 
Court building no South Main Street with a new service. li- 
the process, we ended up abandoning the old galvanized water 
line from the same location and rerouted the water service 
from Elm Street . 

The Department is continuing to grow and branch out in 
covering different issues. We are charged with maintaining 
both the newer high tech building operation systems and some 
of the older systems as well. We are responsible for making 



102 



sure these facilities will be around for a long time. We 
will continue to provide a safe comfortable environment for 
the employees, citizens, and students of the Town of Ipswich 




CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James Graffum, Superintendent 

The Cemetery and Parks Division is responsible for the 
upkeep the maintenance of nine cemeteries and seven parks. 
This past year we assisted the contractor in the 
installation of new fencing at Bialek Park Little League 
fields . 

We have also been assigned the task of clearing and 

maintaining paths on the former Wendel Estate "Strawberry 
Hill", and the Dow Brook Conservation property which is 
located off High Street. We are also responsible for the 
maintenance of all the Towns open space, Town commons, 
Crane Beach "Ipswich side" boardwalk, and the Pavilion 
Beach area . 

During the winter season as weather permits, Bakers Pond 
and the rink at Bialek Park are plowed off to accommodate 
skaters . 

We also continue to assist civic groups in the many 
activities that take place throughout the year, as well as 



103 



supply aid to the Public Works Department in snow removal, 
sanding operations, and any other emergency situations as 
needed. 

There were one hundred and two funerals in 2 003. 

REVENUE 

Chapel Tent: $1,650 

Foundat ions : 2,437 

Openings: 37,2 00 

Perpetual Care: 9,500 

Sale of Lots: 11,400 

TOTAL $62,187 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - James A. Sperber, Director 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

James A. Sperber, Building Inspector 



Category/ 
Construction 


#of 
Permits 


Total Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


44 


$ 23,723.00 


$ 


3,093,069.00 


Certificate of 
Occupancy 


55 


$ 1,375.00 


N/A 


Commercial - New 


5 


$ 31,297 


$ 


46,509,908.00 


Decks & Porches 


44 


$ 3,383.00 


$ 283,190.00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


9 


$ 7,636.00 


$ 


1, 004,200.00 


Demolition 


13 


$ 703.00 


$ 79,000.00 


Detached Accessory 


42 


$ 4,302.00 


$ 396,893.00 


Fence 


11 


$ 660.00 


$ 31,092.00 


Multi -Family Dwelling 


8 


$ 18,846.00 


$ 


2,433,220.00 


Miscellaneous 


26 


$ 1,762.00 


$ 196,650.00 


Remodel / Alteration 


155 


$ 27,453.00 


$ 


6, 109,211.00 


Repair 


77 


$ 5,788.00 


$ 636,516.00 


Roofs, Siding, 
Windows 


214 


$ 19,098.00 


$ 


2, 082, 168.75 


Single Family 
Attached 


5 


$ 12,014.00 


$ 


1, 707,565.00 


Single Family 
Dwelling 


18 


$ 44,368.00 


$ 


6,400, 672 .00 


Sign 


29 


$ 1,315.00 


$ 23,459.00 


Stove 


15 


$ 700.00 


$ 24,950.25 



104 



Swimming Pools 


10 


$ 1,164.00 


$ 127,859.00 


Tents 


10 


$ 350.00 


$127, 859.00 


Totals 


790 


$ 205,937.00 


$ 


71,267,482 .00 



Plumbing 


Total Fees 


Gas 


Total Fees 


244 


$ 29,765.00 


216 


$ 12,830.00 



** As in prior years, fees for plumbing and gas permits are 
split 50% / 50% for the salary of Plumbing / Gas Inspector 
Robert Hyde and the Town of Ipswich. 

Please remember that building permits are required for not 
only new construction, but for repairs and replacement of 
existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, & fences also. 
If you have any question about whether your project may 
require a building permit, please call our office at 978- 
356-6605. Thank you. 

******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 

Following is the yearly report of activities for 2003: 



Licenses and Permits Issued 

Food Service 65 

Retail Food 24 

Caterer 8 

Temporary Food 12 

Mobile Food 6 

Frozen Desserts 3 
Disposal System Construction 

Permits 105 

Septic Haulers 16 

Septic Installers 56 

Septic System Inspectors 26 

Swimming Pools 8 

Recreational Camps 6 

Massage Practitioners 31 

Massage Establishments 13 

Tanning Facilities 3 

Private Well Permits 9 

Tobacco 2 3 

Funeral Directors 2 



Health Inspections and 

Investigations 

Food Service Inspections 180 

Housing Inspections 13 

Nuisance & Environmental 

Complaints 2 9 

Percolation Tests 124 

Deep Hole Observations 255 

Septic System Inspections 263 

Swimming Pool Inspections 7 

Surface Water Testing 105 



Sealer of Weights 

& Measures Inspections 

Liquid Measuring Meters 91 
Scales & Balances 69 

Scanners 2 



105 



COMMUNITY HEALTH 

Immunization and Clinics Public Health Follow-up 



Influenza 


453 


Lyme Disease 


48 


Pneumonia 


2 


Camp hylobac tor 


9 


Tetanus 





Hepatitis C 


7 


Well Elderly 


17 


Salmonella 


3 


Clinics 








Hepatitis B 


12 


Bebesiosis 


2 






Encephalitis 


2 






Erlichia 


2 






Streptococcus 


2 






Tuberculosis 


2 


- 




Influenza 


1 






Legionella 


1 






Pertussis 


1 






Rabies 


1 



REGULATION PASSED 

The Board of Health Environmental Tobacco Smoke Regulation 
became effective August 1, 2003. The Youth Access Tobacco 
Regulation was amended effective September 1, 2003. 

BOARD OF HEALTH MEMBER RETIRES/NEW BOARD MEMBER APPOINTED 

After twenty years of dedicated service to the Board of 
Health, Dr. Kenneth Zinn retired from the Board. Dr. 
Spencer Amesbury was appointed in August 2 03 to serve on 
the Board of Health. 

■*•■*■*••*•**■*•'*• 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Keith B. Hughes, Chairman 

David G. Mollica, Vice-Chair 

Robert A. Gambale, Vice-Chair 

James A. Sperber, Director of Code Enforcement 

Linda F. Valle, Administrative Assistant 

There were one hundred seven (107) petitions before the 
Zoning Board of Appeals in 2003, an increase of one (1) 
from 2002. There were four (4) Appeals of the Building 
Inspector's decisions (the same as 2002). Three (3) were 
granted and one (1) was denied. There were thirty-four (34) 
Special Permit requests, eight (8) less than 2002. Twenty- 
nine (29) were granted, and five (5) were withdrawn. There 
were sixty-six (66) Variance requests, six (6) more than 
2002. Forty-three (43) were granted, seven (7) were denied, 



106 



thirteen (13) were withdrawn, and three (3) were continued. 
There were three (3) requests for Comprehensive Permits 
this year, as compared to none (0) in 2002, with two (2) 
granted and one (1) continued. 

The Board finds its need for administrative support 
continues to increase. Files are constantly updated and 
entered on a database. 

The Zoning Board of Appeals is composed of five (5) Members 
and two (2) Associate Members, all of whom were appointed. 
Numerous hours are put in by these unpaid volunteers, the 
Chairman especially; and they perform a valuable service 
for the Town. Keith Hughes was again the Board's Chairman, 
and David Mollica and Robert Gambale were the Vice-Chairs. 
The two other Members were Arthur N. Sot is and Kevin B. 
Lombard. The two Associate Members were Roger D. LeBlanc 
and Timothy S . Perkins . 

Members Keith Hughes, David Mollica, and Arthur Sotis 
resigned in December. Their resignations were accepted with 
regret. They had more than 33 years of service to the Town, 
and their experience and integrity will be greatly missed 
by all. At the time of printing, there had not been any 
appointments made to the Zoning Board by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

The Board would also like to thank Jim Sperber, the 
Building Inspector, and Linda Valle, the Board's 
Administrative Assistant, for their administrative support 
and a job well-done. 



*■*•■*•*•**** 



DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT - Glenn C. Gibbs , Director 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for 
guiding the development and conservation of land in the 
Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and 
through the development and implementation of long-range 
plans. It does this in part by providing support and 
guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its 
directorate: Planning Board, Conservation Commission, the 
Historical Commission, and the Affordable Housing 



107 



Partnership (reports on their activities are given below) . 
The Department also provides support to the Open Space 
Committee and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are 
some of the initiatives undertaken by the Department in 
2003 : 

> In conjunction with the Growth Management Steering 
Committee and Daylor Consulting, coordinated the final 
revisions to and the public review and adoption of, the 
2 03 Community Development Plan. 

> Submitted grant application for $547,447 in 
transportation enhancement funds to enhance the 
streetscape of the North Main Street and Meetinghouse 
Green area. Goals of the project include improving 
pedestrian safety and access to the area and restore the 
historic and scenic character of the North Green. 

> Working with an ad hoc water supply protection 
committee, state officials, and interested citizens, 
refined the comprehensive rewrite of the water supply 
protection provision of the zoning bylaw. 

> In conjunction with the DPW Director, oversaw the 
construction of the North Main Street/North Green area 
drainage improvements. 

> Enlisted a graduate student team from Tufts University 
to conduct a rental housing survey, which provided 
valuable information to the Affordable Housing 
Partnership. 

> Developed general bylaw to establish regulations 
controlling excessive noise, directed primarily 
commercial and night-time activity 

> Under the leadership of Tracie Mines, Open Space 
Program Manager, took the following actions to protect 
properties listed as critical open space by the Open 
Space Bond authorization: 

• Negotiated agreement to purchase 22 -acre Gaspar 
property off High Street, the last privately-held 
parcel of land within the complex of municipally 
owned watershed lands surrounding the Dow and Bull 
Brook Reservoirs. The purchase of the property, at 
a cost of $33,000, will enhance the protection of 
the Town's drinking water supply. 



108 



• Acquired the 34 -acre Dow Brook Conservation Area on 
High Street for $350,000 (A State Self -Help Grant 
Program reimbursed the Town $199,105 of the cost.). 
A planning process for providing a public parking 
area and access trails on the property is currently 
underway. 

• Completed the planning and permitting process for 
six car parking area at the Strawberry Hill 
(formerly Wendel) property on Jeffreys Neck Road. 
Construction will be undertaken in the spring of 
2004 . 

• Initiated successful effort to expand 7.5 hour per 
week Open Space Program Assistant position into a 15 
hour per week Stewardship Coordinator/Open Space 
Assistant position. The position's responsibilities 
include: (a) coordinating general property 
maintenance, public access improvements, property 
signage, neighbor relations and ecological 
monitoring and restoration on Town owned 
conservation lands; and (b) monitoring Town-held 
conservation restrictions on private land. 

The year 2003 was a year of transition for the Planning 
Office. Long-time Planning Assistant Joan Vontzalides 
resigned her position in September to take a part-time 
position in a nearby town. In November, Kate Day of West 
Newbury was hired to be the new Planning Assistant. Also 
in November, the Department said goodbye to Tracie Hines, 
who resigned her position to return to school and her two 
young children. A search for her replacement is currently 
underway . 

Finally, in December of this year, Open Space Program 
Assistant Beth O'Connor was appointed as the new 
Stewardship coordinator for the Town. Beth continues to do 
many of her previous functions, but now has additional 
hours and responsibilities. We bid a sad farewell to Joan 
and Tracie, and offer a hearty welcome to Kate and 
congratulations to Beth. 



109 



******** 



PLANNING BOARD 

David T. Santomenna, Co-Chair 
Charles Allen, Co-Chair 

The year 2003 saw significant change and high levels of 
activity for the Planning Board. With long-time Chair 
Leslie Brooks' departure, the Board elected to adopt a co- 
chair structure, with David Santomenna taking 
responsibility for chairing Planning Board meetings and the 
day-to-day functioning of the Board, and Charlie Allen 
managing the Board in its long-term planning functions, 
most notably with regard to zoning-related items to be 
presented at the Fall Town Meeting. Tim Purinton was 
appointed to fill Santomenna' s associate position. Josh 
Massey stepped down mid-year and was as replaced by Tim 
Purinton; Jim Monahan was then appointed to fill the 
Associate Member position. 

Planning Matters 

Year 2003 marked the completion of the Community 
Development Plan, which was adopted by the Planning Board 
and endorsed by Town Meeting as the Town' s primary guidance 
document on growth, zoning and planning issues. The 
Planning Board looks forward to using the Community 
Development Plan as it considers new zoning and development 
proposals . 

The efficacy of the co-chair structure was established at 
Fall Town Meeting, when eight out of nine proposals put 
forth by the Planning Board were approved by Town Meeting. 
Charlie Allen was successful in integrating earlier and 
more thoughtful consideration of zoning articles into the 
Board's deliberations, and great effort was put into 
enhanced outreach to other boards, organizations, the local 
news outlets and the public, with the goal of having 
broader support and better understanding of the various 
articles prior to Town Meeting. Changes were approved to 
provide additional infill housing opportunities, the 
existing water supply protection scheme was extensively 
overhauled, an industrial property was re- zoned to better 
reflect the existing development patterns, and certain 
changes were made to the Great Estate bylaw, among other 
items. The one item that failed to pass, the creation of a 
Village Incentive District that would enable higher-density 
development in a specific area, when coupled with open 



110 



space protection and the creation of affordable housing, 
was debated in a thoughtful and civil manner, and was 
narrowly defeated. 

Regulatory Matters 

The Board reviewed ten applications for site plan review in 
2003. Of these, seven were new projects, and three were 
modifications of previous approvals. All of the 
applications were approved, with the exception of one which 
is pending. 

Nine special permit applications were also filed with the 
Planning Board. The Board approved a multi- family special 
permit for three dwelling units on Soffron Lane, a special 
permit for the residential conversion of an existing 
accessory structure, two modifications to the special 
permit for New England Biolabs, and one amendment to the 
Ipswich Country Club special permit, among others. One 
application is pending. 

As for subdivisions, the Board approved a one -lot 
definitive subdivision plan off Pineswamp Road, modified a 
one-lot subdivision approval off Chattanooga Road, and is 
currently reviewing a one- lot subdivision plan off 
Linebrook Road. In perhaps the Board's most difficult and 
complicated matter, the Board voted in January to deny a 
seven-lot definitive subdivision plan for property off 
Heartbreak Road. In May the Board rescinded the 
applicants' constructive approval; subsequently, the Board 
voted in December to revoke its previous denial, based on 
the Applicant's compliance with the reasons for 
disapproval. Three separate appeals of this matter are 
pending . 

Finally, the Board reviewed and endorsed ten applications 
for ANR (Approval Not Required under Subdivision Control 
Law) . 

The Board wishes once again to thank Glenn Gibbs, Director 
of Planning and Development, and Kate Day, for their 
tireless efforts on our behalf. 



Ill 



********* 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 

Mary Capkanis, Vice Chair 

David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 

Marie Rodgers, Recording Secretary 

The Conservation Commission is composed of seven appointed 
Town residents who serve as unpaid volunteers. During 2003, 
former board member Sandra Hamilton's term expired. She 
was replaced by new appointee Barbara Beaman who is a 
retired teacher from the Ipswich public school system. 
Also, Nathan Harris, a local tree farmer, was appointed as 
an associate member. 

The Commission continued its role as regulator, 
administrative land manager, and advisor to other municipal 
officials and boards on conservation matters. The 
Commission also serves the public as a provider of 
information on conservation and land preservation 
activities in the community. Most of the Commission's time 
is dedicated to its role as the local environmental 
regulatory board under the Massachusetts Wetlands 
Protection Act and the local Ipswich Wetlands Protection 
Bylaw. In 2 03 the Commission continued to work in concert 
with the Open Space Committee and Open Space Program 
Manager on land acquisition. This past year the Commission 
also continued a program of reviewing and revising certain 
of its policies, regulations and documentation in an effort 
to enhance its services to the public and streamline its 
operations. The staff is preparing new filing guidance 
materials expected to issue in 2004. The website was 
improved significantly in 2 003 and is a continuing process. 

In 2 03, the Commission continued regulatory review of 
several complex projects, including New England Biolabs' 
construction of new quarters at the former Don Bosco Estate 
on County Road, and Turner Hill LLC s construction of an 
eighteen-hole golf course and housing development at the 
former La Salette Shrine/Rice Estate on Topsfield Road. A 
committee has been formed to look at assessing impacts from 
several projects and violations in the vicinity of the 
central portion of town near the divergence of Pineswamp 
and Linebrook Roads, in an ongoing process. The Commission 
also continues to work on the issues of illegal dumping in 
town and beaver activity management with continuing 



112 



development of a local policy to assist affected owners in 
beaver management and to encourage use of water level/flow 
control devices known as beaver deceivers . 

This year the Commission took 136 official regulatory 
actions, as listed below, which demonstrates the permitting 
activities as compared with the previous six years. 



Activity 


1997 


1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


2003 


















Notice of Intent 


62 


52 


77 


44 


36 


46 


39 


Order of Conditions 


59 


64 


63 


40 


43 


40 


39 


Abbrev. Notice of Resource 
Area Delineation 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


2 


7 


Request for Determination 
of Applicability 


67 


47 


26 


45 


27 


21 


33 


Certificate of Compliance 


10 


16 


25 


13 


24 


17 


17 


Extension Permits 


5 


5 


2 


14 


12 


4 


5 


Enforcement Actions/Orders 


5 


6 


8 


10 


8 


7 


15 



To accomplish this permitting process, Commission members 
attended twenty- two regularly scheduled evening meetings, 
visited numerous projects and fielded dozens of citizen's 
queries. Staff continues to respond to hundreds of routine 
queries, and to inspect all proposed project sites. Staff 
attempts with limited success to periodically inspect 
permitted sites under construction, due to time/personnel 
constraints. 

In 2003 the Commission struggled with several difficult and 
vexing situations of direct non -compliance with the laws 
and regulations and with Commission Orders. These efforts 
require considerable time and energy, and are distracting 
and disturbing to all involved. They illustrate the 
desirability of greater public awareness and understanding 
of the wetlands laws, regulations and procedures, the need 
for an enhanced program of project inspections, and the 
need for a more effective, eff icient, rational and fair 
system of enforcement. The Commission is currently 
attempting to address those needs, within its capabilities 
and significant workload. 

EMPACT Grant Report 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EMPACT Grant, 
awarded to the Town of Ipswich in December 2000 for the 
purpose of monitoring the Ipswich River and Parker River 
watersheds, continued its final year of monitoring in 2003. 



113 



The water quality monitoring took place during the spring, 
summer and fall of 2 003 at three sites in the two 
watersheds. At one of those sites the data was transmitted 
via cell phone telemetry, which was processed daily to 
update the data on the IPSWATCH web site in near real-time. 
The results of the monitoring program can be accessed on 
the IPSWATCH web site, www. ipswatch. unh. edu , along with 
other relevant environmental information specific to the 
watersheds . 

Nearly five thousand brochures promoting the IPSWATCH 
website were distributed this past year in over a dozen 
towns throughout the watersheds in libraries, Town Halls 
and places of recreation. A portion of the grant was also 
allocated to conduct water quality sampling at the new 
storm drain treatment receptors located on Town Hill in 
Ipswich, which drains into Farley Brook and out into the 
Ipswich River behind Market Street . 

A final technical and financial report will be prepared and 
presented to the EPA in March 2004, including results 
concluded from the monitoring program, in conjunction with 
the sampling data compiled from our project partners. The 
Town of Ipswich was fortunate to have been the recipient of 
one of the last EMPACT grants awarded through the EPA, as 
the EMPACT program was eliminated in 2 001; nevertheless, 
the EMPACT web page is still accessible at 
http : //www . epa . gov/empact/index. htm . 

******** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Moss Jr., Chairman 

The annual Mary Conley Award was presented to Matthew 
Cummings for his work in the design and renovation of the 
Knowlton House on County Street. The project began last 
year after several years of discussion among the owners, 
town officials, the Historical Commission, and the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission. The building once 
housed the workshop of Abraham Knowlton, one of the 
earliest of the colonial carpenters and cabinetmakers. Many 
of the buildings original fixtures and structural elements 
are now incorporated into several condominium units. All of 
the work was done with care to preserve the historical 
features of the house and its relationship to the 
streetscape . 



114 



Another major historical accomplishment took place at the 
other side of town. This involved the recording of a 
preservation restriction on the property located at 417-19 
Linebrook Road. The owner worked closely with the Zoning 
Board of Appeals and the Commission to preserve the 
historic portion of the house. The property has now been 
sold with a preservation covenant which prevents the 
destruction of the historic features of the house. Both 
the Knowlton house and the Linebrook property are examples 
of how the Commission, the Town boards and the property 
owners can work together to preserve Ipswich' s historic 
character to the benefit of everyone. 

The Selectmen and Town Manager again agreed to approve the 
continuation of the revolving account for the Commission 
which will allow the Commission to secure funds 
independently. The fund was established by Walter Pojasek 
with the help of the treasurer's office. Walter has 
arranged for the sale of a limited edition of copies of the 
Ipswich Declaration of Independence. The copies will be 
sold through the Ipswich Historical Society, which will 
share in the proceeds. Several of these copies have been 
sold, and we anticipate selling the remaining copies in 
2004. There will be only 100 copies, which will be numbered 
and accompanied by a certificate attesting to the 
authenticity and explaining the history of the "Ipswich 
Declaration" . 

At the fall town meeting, the Commission presented an 
article, which would have increased the time period of the 
demolition delay bylaw from six months to one year. The 
Commission strongly recommended this bylaw change as a 
needed tool for the Town to protect historic structures 
from hasty demolition. The bylaw amendment was supported 
by the Selectmen but failed to pass at town meeting. The 
Commission is looking forward to working with the Planning 
Board and any other interested town boards or organizations 
to draft a new proposal to protect the historic structures 
of Ipswich. 



115 



*■*••*•**■*•*■* 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

William Gallagher, Chairman 

The Ipswich Affordable Housing Partnership concentrated its 
efforts this year on the following objectives of its 
Mission Statement: 

• promote and assist with the development of affordable 
housing in Ipswich which reflects the goals and 
character of the community; 

• establish housing priorities for the town; and 



• 



assist in the resolution of concerns regarding 
specific development proposals. 



The Partnership's chief undertaking in 2003 was the 
commissioning of a Housing Af fordability Study conducted by 
a graduate student team from Tufts University. The central 
component of the study was a rental survey, which provided 
the Partnership with an improved understanding of the 
rental housing market in Ipswich. 

Other activities of the Partnership in 2003 included: 

> recommended that Selectmen commit additional $20,000 
of HOME funds toward the reuse of the Whipple Annex 
for elderly rental housing; 

> assisting the Planning Board with the development of 
housing-related zoning initiatives; 

> provided $6,500 in down payment assistance to an 
individual purchasing a condominium at Appleton Park, 
under the Town's first-time homebuyer program; 

> reviewed with project proponents proposed 4 0B 
developments at 187 County Road, 112 County Road, and 
62 Topsfield Road, and provided comments and 
direction. 

Current members of the Partnership are William "Jay" 
Gallagher, Ed Dick, Don Greenough, Don Bowen, Karen Wallen, 
Don Gill, Jim Warner, and Michael Schaaf . Staff 



116 



assistance in 2003 was provided by Glenn Gibbs and Marie 
Rodgers . 



■k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 



Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

A variety of programs, services, and activities were 
organized for all age groups including a number of 
community-based social services. 

Family events included the July 4th Parade & Field Day, a 
Halloween parade & program, and parades on Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day organized by local veterans groups. 
Cooperation with the Ipswich Holiday Happenings provided a 
memorial tree lighting ceremony and a Santa Parade in 
conjunction with holiday shopping initiatives. 

Summer offerings included tennis lessons at Bialek Park, 
golf lessons at Ipswich Country Club, Workreation and 
social events for young teens, Jr. Summer Fun, the annual 
youth Sand Sculpture Day at Crane's Beach, and drop-in 
activities at Bialek Park with optional field trips. Swim 
lessons were contracted at the YMCA and resident lot 
parking attendants were contracted at Crane's Beach. 




Summer evening programs featured the West Newbury Volunteer 
Fire Association Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a magic show by 
Rich Nunziato on "Harry Potter's Birthday", and a Kids Dog 
Show with a demonstration by the Old Colony Obedience Club. 



117 



The Recreation Department -sponsored community band provided 
concerts outdoors at Cable Gardens and indoors at the 
Performing Arts Center. 

Fall activities included Homework and Computer Projects, 
Crafts Club, Cooking Club, Adventure activities, a Creative 
Hands quilting and knitting group, and weekly off-site 
trips to skateparks, movies, and bowling activities. Winter 
programs included two learn- to- ski programs for grades 3-5 
and 6-8, several February vacation week activities 
including a Harry Potter Day, and adult sessions of 
volleyball, and ping pong. Golf classes were offered at the 
Rowley Country Club for children during spring and fall 
seasons . 



Town Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen and 
snack bar area, storage pantry, cafeteria/lounge, crafts 
room, and gymnasium are being shared by the Recreation 
Department, the Council on Aging, and number of evening 
users for a variety of programs and services . 

A successful fund-raising effort with sales of coffee mugs 
and some generous private donations made it possible to 
purchase an almost new 2 02 van in time for summer programs 
and some after school trips. It also was available as a 
back-up to the 1998 Council on Aging van. 

Volunteer efforts by local moms helped to paint the gazebo 
at Bialek Park while parents and staff from the Birth to 
Three Center raked fall leaves at Fr . Rye Park and planted 
bulbs for the spring. Voluntary contributions of funds and 
direct help provided scholarships so that interested 



118 



students could be involved regardless of their ability to 
pay for fee-based programs. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation 
Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss 
programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for 
the future. Members continued to volunteer at a number of 
programs . 

*■*■*■*'•*•'*•** 

YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the 
lives of Ipswich youth by offering a number of varied 
programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of 
this unique population. Our foundation continues to be 
community collaboration, and many programs were developed as 
joint ventures with other local agencies in direct response 
to community needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer 
teens, church youth groups, and those referred through the 
local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were 
involved in cleaning and painting projects, outdoor work at 
park sites, and some services for needy seior citizens. 

After school clubs continued led by local students and 
experts recruited to teach a variety of classes. The 
Thursday early release days provide opportunities for field 
trips to area skate parks, movies, and a bowling program. 
In addition, many inter -generational experiences have 
developed such as senior citizens helping to teach children 
knitting and quilting. 

Talk To a Friend, our peer leadership program for Ipswich 
Youth, met weekly to receive training based on current youth 
issues. Peer Leaders also helped chaperone activities for 
younger children, assume some mentoring and mediation 
responsibilities, and organize intergeneration suppers with 
local senior citizens. They also continue to prepare for 
outreach and speaking engagements such as the Essex County 
Youth Conference and are an active voice in teen policies and 
programs . 



119 



The Zone Cafe is flourishing as a focal point for teen 
programs. Occasional concerts continued to showcase local 
talent for high school students, and Middle Sch ool drop -in 
nights and dances continued weekly to serve younger teens. 
The student -operated snack bar provided on site training in 
retail sales and management while offering reasonably price 
items to attendees. 

Family advocacy services were provided on anas-needed basis 
to families in need who met with the youth director to 
determine their current needs and secure connections to 
available services. Regular meetings provided further 
monitoring and coordination of related services. In addition, 
the director was available for after-hours' support and 
crisis intervention for at-risk families. 

Regular training sessions were provided for summer and 
school year support staff to maintain skills in safety 
practices, basic first aid, motivation of students, 
conflict resolution, and group management. The outdoor 
project adventure site continued to serve as team building 
resource and field trip destination for our younger 
charges . 




******** 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich 
were provided under the umbrella of Council on Aging 
Services . 



120 



A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town 
Hall. Three part-time receptionists welcomed guests, 
answered the phone, and assisted with the daily operation 
of the center. 

Regular programs included the Silver Strands choral group, 
a book discussion group, travel club, bridge and card 
groups, knitting and quilting groups, a theatre group, art 
classes and a monthly lunch club. Health-related programs 
included monthly health screenings, weekly blood pressure 
clinics, a monthly nutrition program, Tai Chi, tennis, 
exercise and line dancing classes, and a swimming group. 
Tickets were sold for day trips sponsored by the Recreation 
Department and the Friends of the Ipswich Elderly. 

Special offerings included inter-generational programs, a 
dining program, a stroke prevention clinic, an arthritis 
management seminar, a summer picnic, speakers on a variety 
of health, financial and legal issues, social gatherings 
for special observances, and classes for a wide range of 
interests. A monthly newsletter written by the Director 
reached 1,70 elder households through support of local 
advertisers and a grant for postage. A Caregivers Support 
Group helped those dealing with frail elders. The Director 
continued to coordinate the Senior Citizen Property Tax 
Work-Off Program that placed five senior citizens in paid 
positions in various Town departments. 

A handicapped accessible, 12 -passenger van continued to 
provide local transportation to Ipswich seniors. Use of 
this van has steadily increased providing over 8,300 one 
way rides and logging approximately 21,000 miles of 
service. The Friends group continued to raise funds and 
support projects that fall outside of the COA budget. The 
Friends also contributed to a Christmas party for 185 
seniors held at the Gymnasium at the Town Hall. Grants from 
the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn 
Charitable Society provided a part -time administrative 
assistant, a part -time activities coordinator, a volunteer 
recognition luncheon, and gasoline for the COA van. The 
Coburn Charitable Society provided additional funding for 
curtains for the COA drop- in center. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 4 volunteers who 
provided 1,650 hours of volunteer service to local elders. 
This program also provided volunteers who drove senior 



121 



citizens 18,575 miles to out-of-town medical appointments. 
Other services of the Outreach program included social 
visits, phone calls, help with chores, and guidance in 
making personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. 
The Outreach program served 568 senior citizens during the 
year. Other assistance included Money Management and Bill 
Paying for elders. 

Town contributions to Action, Inc., provided fuel 
assistance to those who qualified as well as Income Tax 
Assistance to any elder who needed guidance. Contributions 
to SeniorCare provided support for elderly still living on 
their own who needed outside support to facilitate their 
independent living arrangements. 

A seven-member council met monthly to review programs and 
operations and plan additional offerings. 




The Council On Aging Staff with Santa 
1-r, Patsy Valcour, Lynne Gibbs, Diane Mitchell, Santa 
(Rick Dorr) , Kathy Lampropoulos , Patricia Frohman, 
Sheila Taylor, and Giles Tremblay 



122 




Council on Aging Christmas Dinner 



***•*•****• 



EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Terrance P. Hart, District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 115 Massachusetts 
General Laws with providing all manner of services to 
veterans and their dependents including widow (er)s. 
Principal workload under state law includes the 
administration of aid to veterans and dependents, which 
deals with the unpredictable variables of illness, 
unemployment, unemployability, labor disputes and the 
economy. 

Communities fund this program, which is subsequently 75% 
reimbursed the following fiscal year by the Commonwealth. 
This is a need-based program, and the Department is 
required to conduct periodic comprehensive review of the 
cases to insure no substantive facts have changed, while 
working with the veteran to identify alternative or long- 
term solutions to individual circumstances. During the 
calendar year, nine Ipswich veterans/widows were on this 
program for varying periods . Under state law the Department 
also assists qualified veterans to obtain bonuses, and 
qualified veterans, widows and parents to obtain state 
annuities, property tax abatements, and other benefits. 



123 



The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive 
interaction within the federal community, principally with 
the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service 
Officer (VSO) assists veterans and their dependents in 
filing for pensions, service connected injury/illness 
compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for 
survivors, VA healthcare enrollment, insurance claims, 
decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefits 
processed by this department are paid directly to those 
eligible to receive the assistance or entitlement. Federal 
VA dollars brought into this community exceed $1 million 
annually, with the current staff responsible for 
approximately $360,000 dollars paid to or saved by those 
assisted in Ipswich. 

Additionally, the Department interacts within the federal 
community to correct military records, obtain needed 
documentation and insure veterans /dependents receive awards 
and recognition to which entitled. The VSO provided 
information, advice or assistance to 199 of the town's 
1,168 identified veterans and 21 of the 248 identified 
veterans' widows during 2003. 

The Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia 
Gadbois, advocate for veterans on issues at the local, 
state and federal level, interact with elected and 
appointed officials on many issues, and work with local 
organizations in serving the community. We also provide 
support and information assistance for National Guard and 
Reserves called up for service in Iraq or Afghanistan and 
their families. Additionally, the District sponsored a 
Korean War Commemorative ceremony in June at Ipswich Town 
Hall in which 63 of the 173 honorees were Ipswich veterans. 
Special Guests included Korean Consul General Jayson Park, 
Lieutenant Governor Kerry Healey, Senator Bruce Tarr, 
Representative Brad Hill, and Selectman James Foley. 



124 




The Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of 
Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, Rowley, West Newbury 
and Wenham. A Board of Directors consisting of one 
selectman (or designee) from each town maintains oversight. 
Mr. James Foley is the Ipswich member of the Board of 
Directors . 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT - Timothy Henry - Director 

ELECTRIC DIVISION 

Raymond R. Shockey - Manager 

The energy market continued to evolve by adding another 
step during 2003. May 1, 2003 saw the implementation of a 
new regional power-delivery and pricing system called 
Locational Marginal Pricing or LMP . This will alter the 
method of pricing and distributing electricity through New 
England by adjusting pricing mechanisms based on geographic 
location. We are also continuing discussions regarding the 
future of the Ipswich power plant . 

We completed work at our Fowlers Lane substation and will 
complete the High Street substation project during the 
first half of 2004. 

The utility also lost two senior line workers to 
retirement, Distribution Foreman David Maclntyre and Lead 
Lineman Tom Poirier. 



125 



In addition, construction of electric lines to two new 
commercial /industrial customers, Turner Hill on Topsfield 
Road and Kortec on Old Right Road, were completed and 
energized. We also started the new feeder and service to 
the New England BioLabs project on Fellows Road that will 
be completed in 2004. 

Kilowatt-hour sales increased 4.8% over 2002 and should 
increase substantially again in 2004 with the addition of 
the new industrial customers . 

2002 sales: 89,987,000 

2003 sales: 94,307,000 

■**•*•■***** 

WATER DIVISION 

Tim Henry - Manager 

A wet spring and summer combined with the introduction of a 
new seasonal rate structure allowed the water departm ent to 
avoid imposing water restrictions in 2003. The new rate 
structure increased the current base water rate of $3.90 / 
100 cubic feet by 1 . 5 times to $5.85 / 100 cubic feet 
during the summer months (May - October) , while dropping 
the base rate to $2.04 / 100 cubic feet November - April. 
The minimum monthly charge of $15.60 was eliminated as part 
of the new structure. 

During the summer the 6" cast iron water main on Fellows 
Road from Lakeman' s Lane to the entrance of New England 
BioLabs was replaced b y New England BioLabs with a new 12" 
ductile iron water main. Fire flows with the existing 6" 
pipe proved inadequate for the new facility at the site, 
prompting its replacement. 

There were 4 extensions to the distribution system in 2003. 

Mitchell Road 1 75 feet of 8" CLDI 

Partridgeberry Place 1 700 feet of 8" CLDI 

Topsfield Road 300 feet of 10" CLDI 

Soffron Lane 1 75 feet of 6" CLDI 

2003 

Meters Replaced 139 



126 



New Services 


35 


Hydrants Installed 


4 


Hydrants Replaced 


13 


New Water Mains Installed (ft) 


2,350 


Total Length of Mains (ft) 


494,235 


Water Services 




Metered Services 


4509 


Unmetered Services 


69 Fire Lines 


Water Usage (Million Gallons) 




Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook) 222 


Brown's Well 


93 


Essex Road Well 


32 


Fellows Road Well 


17 


Mile Lane Well 


32 


Winthrop Wells 


18 



Total Water Usage (MG) 



414 



WATER FILTRATION PLANT 

Joyce S. Kippen, Superintendent 

The Filtration Plant has completed several Capital 
Projects: a new high lift, finished water pump, and a 
state-of-the art chlorine dioxide unit have been installed 
Because of the high metal and organic species in the water 
supply reservoirs and the potential for Trihalomethane 
formation in the treated water, chlorine dioxide is used. 
It is a powerful oxidizer and is elemental chlorine free; 
thus, Trihalomethanes are not formed. The state-of-the art 
unit, processed by a fully automated computer logic panel, 
is able to achieve high chemical conversion efficiencies 
without undesirable by-products such as in the old 
processes. Consequently the metals have been oxidized and 
the Trihalomethanes have been minimized. 

The SCADA system, (System Control and Data Acquisition) , 
which monitors and operates the wells and treatment plant 
functions, has been upgraded in various areas. As in the 
past, the water quality has met or surpassed all state 
requirements . 

Please remember to conserve our water supply. 



127 



******** 



WASTEWATER DIVISION 

John A. Quigley, Jr, 



Superintendent 



We have completed construction and replacement of Lappin' s 
and the High School pump stations on High Street, with one 
Lappin' s station. This station has auxiliary power now 
which neither had before. The station has been problem free 
since installation. 

The other project was replacement of the two digester 
blowers and a new aeration system. This project is also 
completed and running smoothly. 

For the year 2003, we treated 25,890 million gallons of 
wastewater. We took 1,818,100 gallons of septage. 
We processed 1,920 cu. yds. of bio-solids. We recorded 
48.22 inches of rain. 

The following violations occurred in 2003 : 



MONTH $ 


\ OF 


VIOLATIONS 
2 


PARAMETER VIOLATED 


January 03 


'2) fecal conform 


February 03 




2 


[2) fecal coliform 


March 03 




1 


(l)ph 


April 03 




4 


(4)ph 


June 03 




1 


^1) copper 


July 03 




5 


[3) copper (2) fecal coliform 


August 03 




1 


(1) fecal coliform 


September 03 




6 


(2) copper (4) fecal coliform 


October 03 




19 


(19) fecal coliform 


November 03 




2 


(2) fecal coliform 


December 03 




2 


(2) copper 


Composting 


Ope 


rations - 





Agresource has been working with Town of Ipswich managing 
the composting operations located at the end of Town Farm 
Road for over ten years. This year the agreement between 
Agresource and the Town was renewed for another three 
years; and Agresource hopes that when the agreement ends in 
June 2006 the Town will renew for another term. 

The compost facility has typically made about 20,000 cubic 
yards of compost per year and the Town also receives a 
credit of $0.50 per cubic yard for all compost sold. In 
addition, 1,500 cubic yards are provided to Town resid ents 



128 



and the Public Works Department for no charge. We feel that 
this facility has been a benefit to both the Town of 
Ipswich and the region. DEP has supported the facility and 
reviews the operations. Every two years the permit for 
distribution of compost must be renewed by DEP. The most 
recent renewal was in November of 2 03. 

Compost generated from the facility has been a valuable 
product that is provided not only to Town residents but 
used in the region. Agresource has donated compost to 
improve the f iel d located near Town Hall used by the Youth 
Football team and donated 250 yards this year for the 
environmental landscaping performed at the Housing 
Authority/Habitat for Humanity project. Agresource has 
provided the Town with examples of projects that have used 
compost generated at Ipswich in the past years and will 
continue to promote local use of the product . 

FINANCE DIRECTORATE - Rita M. Negri, Finance Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M. Negri - Town Accountant 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time 
staff and a full-time Town Accountant who also serves as 
Finance Director. The Accounting Department is 
responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, 
processing invoices for vendor payments, and preparing all 
W-2's and 1099' s at year-end in accordance with IRS 
regulations . 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the 
accounting records for the Town' s revenues and 
expenditures, ensures that reconciliations are performed 
between applicable Town departments, assists in providing 
information on benefits available to employees, and 
oversees the operation of the Town' s financial computer 
system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent 
audit of the Town's financial statements that was last 
completed by September 19, 2003, for the year ended June 
30, 2003. The financial results for fiscal year 2003 were 
good. This was due to good collections on receivables, and 
responsible spending of appropriations. 



129 



Free Cash for fiscal year 2003 was certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue Division of Local 
Services in November 2003 in the amount of $799,966. 

******** 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Daniel M. Sullivan 

Interim Treasurer/Collector 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the collection 
and investment of all Town revenue, approximately 
$48,490,668.88 per year, along with borrowing both long- 
term funds and trust funds, tax title accounts, cash flow 
and reconciling monthly with the Town Accountant. The 
office also handles all of the billing and data processing 
involved with Real Estate, Personal Property, Motor Vehicle 
and Boat Excise. All receipts were deposited and 
faithfully recorded. 

We were saddened with the departure of our Treasurer, 
Virginia M. Cleary, in early May. Virginia gave more than 
15 years of dedicated service to the Town and is sorely 
missed. Daniel M. Sullivan has been welcomed aboard with 
his appointment in November as interim Treasurer/Collector. 

Beach sticker sales declined slightly in the calendar year 
2003 to just below 6,000, possibly due to a price increase 
instituted July 1. The price of a beach sticker rose from 
$10 .00 to $15 .00 . 

Thank you to our staff, Susan LeMieux, Carol Thurber and 
Corinna Warner for a job well done. Additional thanks go 
to Carol Poirier and Margaret Whittier for their assistance 
in our office with special projects. We would also like to 
thank all the Council on Aging volunteers and Town Hall 
staff for helping to ensure the timely delivery of our tax 
bills. 

******** 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property 
January 1, 2003, was $2,110,469,355. 



130 





$ 






o, 

"5 


1,944, 


,771, 


,352 


92 


.1488 


95, 


, 173, 


, 941 


4 


.5096 


54, 


,795, 


, 700 


2, 


.5964 


15, 


,728, 


,362 



100 


.7452 
.00 



The valuation of the Town by Class is: 



Class 1 Residential 
Class I_I Open Space 
Class III Commercial 
Class IV Industrial 

Personal Property 

Total: 

The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2004 was $9.54 per thousand 
for all property classes. 

**•*•*■*■'*•*'*• 

TOWN CLERK 

ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR 

Frances A. Richards, CMC 

The Town Clerk' s office is responsible for local and state 
elections, recording and certification of all official 
actions from town meetings, census and voter registration, 
maintenance and issuance of vital records, processing and 
issuing licenses and permits approved by the Board of 
Selectmen and various other licenses including dog, 
shellfish, sporting and marriage licenses. 

The Town Clerk' s staff continues to function with all tfe 
noises and interruptions in the hall outside the office. The 
staff consists of the Town Clerk and Assistant Town Clerk 
Elise "Lee" Graves. Lee's outstanding dedication and effort 
make it possible to run this office with only two people. 

Special thanks to my dedicated volunteers! Isobel Coulombe 
has been filing the old original marriage records into 
permanent storage binders and has been responding to some of 
our requests for genealogy. Janet Trask joined our volunteer 
staff in July after her retirement from the IRS. She has 
done an incredible job cleaning up the old files, indexing 
the records for easy retrieval, and has completed the index 
on birth records. I am deeply indebted to Janet for helping 
us with projects that we would never have tim to complete. 

On July 1 st , Terry French from the State Archives and the 
Town Clerk cleaned out the remaining town records in the 



131 



"steel room" at the old town hall and transferred the records 
that must be kept permanently to the new town hall. Mr. 
French also reviewed the old records in the new vault and 
marked up many for destruction. After cleaning up the new 
vault, Peter Parker and Cynthia Swank from the Inlook Group 
started updating the inventory and arrangement of our vault 
records . 

Population Statistics from the Resident List as of June 1, 
2 03 



Ages 
Ages 6 
Ages 12 
Ages 15 
Ages 19 
Ages 2 6 



5 669 

11 944 

14 557 

18 686 

25 969 

35 1,254 



Ages 36 - 45 2,217 

Ages 46- 55 2,380 

Ages 56 - 65 1, 677 

Ages 66 - 75 1, 026 

Ages 76 - 100 996 



Total Population 13,375 



Total number of households- 5,285 



Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past three years 



Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 



2001 



2002 



2003 



106 


118 


130 


112 


94 


122 


81 


78 


78 



There were 48 females and 60 males born to Ipswich 
residents in 2003. Of the total number of deaths recorded 
(71 females, 46 males), 108 were residents. Of the 78 
marriages recorded in Ipswich, 23 took place elsewhere; in 
7 marriages, one party was non-resident and in 31 
marriages, both parties were non-resident. 

Revenue Report for the Town Clerk's Office- 2 03 

Antiques & Old Metals Licenses $ 180.00 

Auction Permits 550.00 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 1,350.00 

Beer & Wine Licenses 9,350.00 

Bowling Alley Licenses 80.00 

By-Laws, Maps Sold 1,342.00 

Class I Licenses 200.00 

Class II Licenses 1,400.00 

Class III Licenses 100.00 

Certified Copy Fees 4 , 176 .25 



132 



Common Victuallers Licenses 4 , 800 . 00 

Dog Licenses 21,735.00 

Kayak License 100.00 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 41,225.00 

Marriage Licenses 1 , 925 . 00 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 1,400.00 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 140.00 

Raffle Permits 150 . 00 

Recording Fees 3 , 784 .45 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 6,600.00 

Shellfish Permits 42 , 920 . 00 

Sporting Licenses 5 , 613 . 50 

Sporting Fees to the Town 2 68 . 55 

Street Lists Sold 1,364.00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 2,830.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 1,200.00 

Total $ 154 , 783 . 75 

Dog Licenses 

2001 2002 2003 
Males 200 193 213 

Neutered Males 618 723 824 

Females 143 141 135 

Spayed Females 795 802 892 

A total of 2,064 dogs were licensed inlpswich for 2003. We 
collected $3,090.00 in late fees from dog owners who failed 
to license their dogs in a timely fashion. Animal Control 
Officers for 2 003 were Harry Leno and Dyan Katz. My sincere 
thanks to Dr. Helen Noble, her staff and Animal Control 
Officer Harry Leno for conducting a Special Rabies Clinic at 
the Highway Garage on February 22nd so dogs could get their 
rabies shots before the March 
31 st licensing deadline. 



Emma is reading the rules 



133 



Shellfish Licenses & Permits 

Resident Yearly 
Resident Family 
Resident Commercial 
Over 70 Free Commercial 
Over 60 Free Recreational 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Daily 

Eagle Hill Stickers 



2001 



2002 



2003 



77 


83 


67 


169 


155 


122 


120 


119 


79 








14 


24 


21 


13 


87 


90 


80 


30 


22 


7 



Revenue from sales of all 2003 shellfish licenses 
$42,920.00 

Sporting Licenses - 2003 



Resident Fishing 

Resident Fishing Handicapped (free) 

Non-Resident Fishing 

Resident Hunting 

Non-Resident Hunting 

Resident Sporting 

Resident Sporting Over 70 (free) 

Archery Stamps 

Primitive Firearms Stamps 

Waterfowl Stamps 

Wildlands Conservation Stamps 

Total 



76 

17 

2 

61 

3 

31 

34 

48 

42 

59 

173 

546 



Revenue sent in to Division of Fisheries & Wildlife $5,613.50 



********* 



ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Board of Registrars 

Phillip F. Grenier, Chairmai 

Orville M. Giddings 

Robert M. Stone 

Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

Another quiet year this year with only one election and two 
town meetings. The Board certified signatures on nomination 
papers and initiative petitions in preparation for the 2004 
elections. Sincere thanks to the Board of Registrars, the 
Election Officials, Jim Graffum and the workers at the 
Cemetery Department, the staff at the YMCA, Cheryl Forster 
and the custodians at the High School/Middle School and my 



134 



son Scott for all their help with the election at the YMCA 
and the town meetings at the Performing Arts Center. 

Election & Town Meetings for 2003 

April 7, 2003 - Annual Town Meeting with 30 articles in the 

warrant - 473 voters attending 

April 15, 2003 - Annual Town Election with 2,792 votes cast 

33% of the total voters (8,696) 

Nov. 4, 2003 - Special Town Meeting with 23 articles in the 

warrant - 2 94 voters attending 

Registered Voters as of December 31, 2003 - 8,771 

Of the 498 new voters registered in 2003, 119 registrations 
were received by mail, 172 registered in the office, 3 at a 
state agency and 204 at the Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

PREC. DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN LIBERTARIAN GREEN UN-ENROLLED TOTAL 



1 448 




350 




7 






5 


1,208 


2 


, 018 


2 497 




360 




7 






4 


1,439 




2,307 


3 325 




410 




14 






1 


1,462 




2,212 


4 444 




341 




12 






8 


1,429 




^234 


Totals 1,714 




1,461 




40 






18 


5,538 




8,771 


Precinct Popul 


at 


ion as of 


Dei 


member 


31, 


2003 











Precinct 1 3,173 

Precinct 2 3,345 

Precinct 3 3,466 

Precinct 4 3,460 

Total Residents All Precincts 13,444 as of December 31, 
2003 

The following served as Election Officials 2003: Andrew 
Agapow, Bruce Bryant, Armand Brouillette, John Meers, Laurien 
Levesque, Charles McKenzie, Theresa Greaney, Dorothy 
Levesque, Mary Cunningham, Carolyn Navarro, Jane Janvrin, 
Ruth Paulitz, Virginia Player, Anne Matous, Diana Comeau, 
Cynthia Burns, Dorcas Rice, Marcia Inman, Irene Brouillette, 
Virginia Comeau, Isobel Coulombe, Moira McLaughlin, James 
Lahar, Marlene Shannon, Ann Fessenden, Margaret Broekel, 
Margaret Whittier, Judith Fudge, Geraldine Heii;, Renata 
Gilmore, Sandra Duke and Nancy Damon. 



135 



******** 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Greg Parachojuk, MIS Director 

The MIS department is charged with the ongoing mission to 
develop, enhance and support the Town's computing and 
telecommunications infrastructure. The Department also 
provides the systems and services necessary for the Town' s 
departments and users to fulfill their stated goals and 
objectives . 

In 2 03, I continued to bring online and support the new 
4GL Munis financial system. It is a continual process in 
applying updates, fixes and enhancements. Also, remote 
printing capabilities from Munis were added to many 
departments. Director's can now print their own reports to 
better manage Town funds and resources. 

The Town's web site http : //www. town. ipswich.ma.us continues 
to evolve. This year's major update was the addition of 
site "Search Functionality." Selectmen meeting Agenda & 
Minutes as well as DPW Online Work Requests were also 
added. I am totally committed in adding new features that 
will enhance the communities experience with local 
government. Stay tuned. 

This year was very trying in combating computer viruses, 
worms, etc. Data security remains a top priority of this 
department; and technologies that allow "Central 
Management" are being used in order to manage these 
problems without increased manpower or resources. 

******** 

PURCHASING/BUDGET/ RISK MANAGEMENT 

Jane H. Spellman 
Assistant Purchasing Agent 
Risk Management Coordinator 
Fixed Assets Coordinator 

The Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all 
Department procurements with the exception of the day to 
day expenditures of the Electric Department, and puts out 
to bid expenditures in excess of $25,000 for goods and 
services and bids construction contracts for all 



136 



departments except the School Department in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

In addition to present contract renewals, the following 
were advertised, put out to bid, bids received with 
contracts awarded: Wireless AT&T Antenna Lease on Plover 
Hill; North Main Street Drainage Project and Amendment #1; 
Construction Observation Services for North Main Street 
Drainage Project; Compost Facility Operation; Aerobic 
Digester Change Order #1; Bituminous Highway Materials 
Renewal; Vehicle Maintenance; Resurfacing Various Roads 
Renewal; Cleaning Catchbasins Renewal; Paint and Painting 
Street Lines; Spry on Acoustical Ceiling Materials at the 
Town Hall; Rehabilitation of Sewer Manholes; Ambulance 
Services; Sidewalk Replacement Addendum #2; Reconstruction 
of Lafayette Road Addendum #1; Guard Rails; Chemical 
Consortium Contracts (8) ; Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Renewal; Bond Counsel Services Renewal; Food Safety 
Consultant Renewal; Engineering Services for Brown's Well; 
Painting the Exterior of Plover Hill Water Tank; 
Engineering Services for County Road Water Main Project; 
Employee Health Care Insurance and Benefits Advisory 
Services; Snow Plowing Contracts (14) ; Consultant Services 
for Dow Brook Conservation Area and Uniform Rentals. 

The Purchasing/Risk Management Office oversaw all Workers 
Compensation long-term cases and reported all Town and 
School employee injuries. All property and casualty 
insurance claims received were reported to the Town' s 
insurance carrier. Insurance renewals were processed, 
policies received, and vehicle, equipment, and computer 
inventories maintained. 

The Purchasing Office was also responsible for copying, 
collating and distributing 2 6 budget copies while meeting 
the set deadline. Budget details with adopted figures for 
FY05 Budget will be inputted and distributed to Departments 
by this office after the Annual Town Meeting. 



137 




Sorting the 26 copies of 435 pages of the FY2005 Budget Book 

The Purchasing Office has been given responsibility for the 
recording of Fixed Assets under the mandate of GASB 
Statement 34 and will be continuing to undertake this 
monumental task. The year 2 03 was the first year of 
reporting assets. This was accomplished to the auditor's 
satisfaction. The process is ongoing. 

The Purchasing Office is also responsible for the 
compiling, editing, printing and distribution of this 
Annual Town Report . 

IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections : New books added: 3,649 (Adult & Young Adult) 
1,388 (Children). New media added: 413 (Adult & Young 
Adult) 2 05 (Children) . Large type, video and audio 
collections enhanced with funds provided by the Friends of 
the IPL. Adult and children's social sciences and 
literature collections were weeded, as were children' s 
paperbacks, religion and language areas. 

Technology : We replaced 6 PCs for public Internet access 
and added a laser printer networked to the new PCs. 10,000+ 
patrons signed up to use the Internet PCs in 2003. An 
update of our Ipac catalog software was released in the 
spring . 



138 



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pswich Public Lirary 



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Cjovemance & Policy 
friends of the library 

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978356,6648 . Fax 978.3S6.664? . spswichftmvic.Esb.ma.us 



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Staff : Leah Zaroulis and Sarah Vickery joined the staff as 
Senior Page and Page in the Children's Department. 

Volunteers : This year Volunteers donated over 1,600 hours 
shelving books, preparing materials, assisting with 
children's programs, etc. Howard Fosdick continued his work 
indexing obituaries from local newspapers . The Town and 
Country Garden Club helped maintain the library grounds, 
while the Ipswich Garden Club decorated the library for the 
holidays. Under the auspices of the Archives Committee 
volunteers began an inventory of manuscript and other 
materials given to the committee over the past 20 years. 

Board of Trustees : New and revised policies approved by 
the Board included: Policy on Bulletin Boards; Display Rack 
and Free Literature Table Policy; Policy on Confidentiality 
of Library Records with Procedures ; Policy on Lending to 
Residents of Municipalities with Decertified Libraries ; 
Exhibits Policy; Internet Acceptable Use Policy; Ipswich 
Room Collections Policy; Policy for Meetings in the Collins 
Room; Library Mission Statement. The Board also issued a 
'Statement' concerning the USA PATRIOT ACT. Anne Brown 
left the Board in 2003 at the end of her term. The 
Selectmen appointed Judith Rusin to the Board. 



139 



Plan of Service : In the fall, the library assembled a 
committee of citizens and staff to begin working on a new 
Plan of Service. Some of the activities accomplished on the 
Plan of Service 2000-2004 included: meetings with the 
school department to promote school/library cooperation; 
enhancement of collections in the social sciences and 
humanities; Internet safety brochures in the Children's 
Dept . ; ^Best Web Sites' list for children; adult book club 
sponsored by library and led by Sue Liacos-Dix. 

Public Relations : In August the library included an 
attractive postcard in the utilities bills sent to each 
Ipswich household. The postcard showed the homepage of the 
library on one side, in full color, with a description of 
services offered on the site on the reverse side. EBSCO 
Publishing funded this PR effort. The library's general 
information brochure was updated, also. 

Building : The lawn area on the North side of the building 
was graded and seeded. Mountain laurel bushes were 
planted. 

Friends : The Friends supported the library this year with 
funds for programs, new materials and equipment, binding 
and children's craft supplies. The Friends also underwrote 
the annual breakfast for volunteers and paid for a 
subscription to the monthly Book Page magazine, which is 
distributed to the public. The Friends also subsidized the 
restoration of a stained glass panel discovered in the 
library' s attic, which now hangs in a window in the first 
floor stacks. The Friends added the New England Aquarium 
pass for the public's use. The Friends also paid for the 
printing of the new general library brochure. 

Bequests & Gifts : Donations were received in memory of 
Marion Moberger. M.L. Scudder, Alicia Hills Moore and 
Fusion Concepts Inc. also made donations. Mr. William 
Bancroft, son of Trudi Bancroft, donated to the library his 
mother' s collection of gardening and landscape design 
books. The Boston Foundation made a donation to the Markos 
Hellenic Fund. 

Programs : The Children's Dept. offered 151 programs with 
3,609 children participating. The ESL program begun in 2002 
sponsored evening classes for 18 students funded by the 
Ipswich Shellfish Company and the Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 
and matched 26 tutors with 35 learners. Reference Librarian 



140 



Paula Grillo hosted three cultural evenings with 79 
participants from the ESL program. The library sponsored 
two series of writing workshops for adults taught by Carla 
Panciera . 

Circulation : Total circulation in 2003 was 123,618 items. 
The library borrowed 8,92 5 items for patrons through 
interlibrary loan. 

Grants : Work continued on the ^Manuscript Arrangement and 
Description' grant of $5,500 federally funded with LSTA 
funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners. Six collections were described, arranged 
and preserved. A NMRLS digital library grant allowed us to 
digitize the complete run of the Antiquarian Papers, a 19 
century serial edited by Arthur Wesley Dow. The library 
received a grant from the Coburn Charitable Society for the 
purchase of large print and audiovisual materials. 

Awards : The library received a second place award in the 
brochures category from the Massachusetts Library 
Association. 

******** 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan Arsenault, Chair 

This past year was marked by several noteworthy events. We 
welcomed our two newest members into the fold as Dianne 
Ross and Dr. Hugh 0' Flynn were elected to serve. Margot 
Sherwood stepped down after devoting twenty-three years of 
service to the children of Ipswich. After completing two 
terms on the Committee, Debbie Henry chose not to seek re- 
election. They will be remembered for their dedication and 
commitment to excellence in education for all children. 

Our fiscal challenges continue to impact the schools and 
have hindered our overall ability to fully fund programs 
and personnel. Reductions were realized at all levels 
throughout the district. Despite the uncertainty of our 
financial future, the School Committee remains focused and 
committed to meeting the educational needs of all children. 
Working in conjunction with the Superintendent, 
administrative team, and our professional staff, we have 
made every attempt to keep necessary reductions beyond the 
centrality of the classroom. 



141 



Most troubling is a recurring dependence on outside funding 
sources in order to provide essential resources and 
services to the students and faculties of our schools. The 
School Committee utilized in excess of $700,000 from a 
variety of accounts (i.e., Feoffees, Choice, Extended Day 
Program, School Lunch, Pepsi) , to cover unforeseen 
increases in operational costs realized in utilities, 
insurances, transportation, and special education. A 
corresponding 20% reduction in available Chapter 70 dollars 
conspired to further hinder our ability to spend our 
appropriated budget on its intended use. 

A major initiative this past year was undertaken as the 
Committee moved decisively to rewrite the existing Feoffees 
of the Grammar School trust . Working closely with legal 
counsel, the School Committee looks to complete this 
daunting task in the very near future. The School 
Committee is grateful to representatives of the various 
Town boards who have offered input and recommendations for 
consideration. Much discussion still needs to happen, but 
we remain hopeful and encouraged that consensus will soon 
be reached and the rewrite of the sadly outdated document 
will be done. It is the Committee's hope that the 
allocated dollars will again be designated for the 
enhancement and enrichment of our quality educational 
programs . 

The School Committee is again thankful to Representative 
Hill, Senator Tarr, and to the countless members of the 
other Town committees who continue to advocate for quality 
education in our four schools. In addition, we would be 
remiss if we didn't recognize those citizens of Ipswich who 
gave tirelessly of. their time and resources in support of 
our schools. Their fundraising efforts have allowed us to 
supplement our athletic programs, purchase textbooks, and a 
variety of essential programs that make us a truly unique 
and outstanding school district . 

We look ahead with guarded optimism and eager anticipation 
to the many opportunities that await. We will continue to 
rely on the unwavering support of our community as 
together, with an eye to the future, we build upon our 
successes of the past . 



142 



******** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb 

The FY04 school year has indeed been a unique one filled 
with opportunities, rewards and challenges. The overriding 
issue continues to be the fiscal problems that have plagued 
the State and the community, thus impacting the School 
District's ability to deliver the educational services it 
feels are necessary to maintain the quality educational 
programs this community expects and deserves. 

As is the case every year, the School Committee and I set 
goals to guide us toward our vision. This year's are as 
follows : 

1. Develop a District-wide Budget that Reflects the 

Educational and Operational Priorities of the School 
System. 



Obj ectives/Strategies 



• Restore funding to those areas of our budget that 
enhance student learning. 

• Provide funding for a fair and equitable 
compensation package for all employees which will 
allow us to retain and attract quality 
educational staff throughout the system. 

2. Preserve and Enhance the "District-wide Culture". 



Obj ectives/Strategies 



• Promote collaboration and communication 
throughout the system. 

• Work to strengthen the working relationships 
between the School Committee, Administration and 
Staff. 

• Provide for continuous opportunities within our 
"site-based model" to develop leaders and support 
and nurture an atmosphere of high expectations 
and accountability. 



143 



3 . Encourage the Development and Modeling of 
Practices" . 



test 



Objectives/Strategies 

• Develop "mastery models" that incorporate our 

technological resources to assist in implementing 
the frameworks in keeping with the Technology 
Timeline as adopted by the District. 



• Continue to implement and extend such educational 
initiatives as looping, multi-grade 
opportunities, CAST, Fresh Pond, inclusionary 
special education programs, and guided reading 
and writing, all of which provide quality 
learning opportunities for students. 

• Implement the revised and adjusted Phase III 
Curriculum SAC Model that clearly identifies 1) 
the curriculum implementation cycle and 
procedures, 2) the curriculum implementation 
guidelines and recommendations, 3) the curriculum 
evaluation guidelines and recommendations, and 4) 
establishes the "roles and responsibilities" of 
each SAC member. 

• Enhance the District-wide "constructivist" 
approach to learning which is designed to foster 
students to take responsibility for their own 
learning in an applications -based environment and 
encourage the students to be self -directed and 
collaborative learners. 

• Support an educational atmosphere that encourages 
teachers to be creative and innovative in their 
approach to pedagogy and provides opportunities 
for them to apply for grant funding to implement 
these new initiatives. 

I am pleased to report that progress toward these goals has 
been positive and productive. 

Our staff continues to adopt the philosophy that we must 
always be on a track of continuous improvement. That 
attitude is reflected in the ongoing evaluation of programs 
that occur each year. 



44 



Our Early Childhood Birth to Age Three Program continues to 
flourish, serving over 500 families in the community. 

This year, once again, our MCAS test scores placed us far 
above the State average in over 90% of the categories. Our 
Middle School and High School scores were once again 
impressive and our Elementary scores were improved over 
last year. We will continue to strive to improve our tests 
scores and have teams of professional educators in place 
analyzing test results and providing valuable analysis, 
which will lead to adjustments in our curriculum to assure 
it is aligned with the State Frameworks. 

The various subcommittees of the School Committee worked 
diligently in a number of areas, including curriculum, 
policy development, technology, athletics and 
communications . 

Some of the highlights of the FY04 school year include the 
completion of the Elementary Capital Improvements Project, 
addressing a number of infrastructure issues such as a 
partial new roof and new boiler at Winthrop Elementary. 

Ipswich High School was the recipient of the "Compass 
School Award", recognizing it as one of the top high 
schools in the Commonwealth. 

The 2003-2004 school year also marked the second year of 
implementing our District Strategic Planning document. 
Each school has identified the current initiatives and 
Action Plans that we have in place in keeping with the 
planned goals of: 1) student achievement, 2) instructional 
practices, 3) operational priorities, and 4) communication 
practices. It is our hope and goal that this plan will 
help guide us and direct us over the next three to five 
years . 

The Ipswich School System is a leader across the nation in 
the area of technology integration across the curriculum. 
In a recent Boston College study, Ipswich was shown to be 
one of the top five school districts in the Commonwealth 
when it came to utilization and implementation of 
technology into the curriculum. We are proud to feature 
numerous 21st Century Classrooms within our school district 
that are designed to foster students who take 
responsibility for their own learning in an application- 
based environment committed to high expectations. Within 



145 



this information-rich, technology-enhanced learning 
environment, the teacher creates a challenging project - 
centered, interdisciplinary classroom. The ultimate goal 
within the 21st Century Classroom is that students will 
become self -directed learners who strive toward continuous 
improvement through reflection and self -assessment ; 
collaborative learners who take responsibility for their 
own role in a group; and proficient learners who design and 
present projects and apply the required knowledge 
appropriately . 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to 
the citizens and parents of Ipswich who have given so 
generously in supporting quality education for all 
children. Support staff, teachers, administrators, 
parents, students and citizens working in partnership with 
each other will move this District forward in a culture of 
continuous improvement and excellence. 

********* 

IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

Following the adage "If you build it, they will come", I am 
pleased to report that the Ipswich High School population 
has grown significantly. The 2003 -2004 school year opened 
with an enrollment of 621 students compare d to 474 in the 
year prior to the opening of the new building. Student 
enrollment reflects both growth in the system and students 
returning from private schools to attend the high school . 

The Ipswich High School program has been recognized by the 
Department of Education. We have been selected as one of 
four high schools across the state to be designated Compass 
Schools. This designation reflects the quality of our 
program, our success on the MCAS, and our serving as a 
model school for other high schools. 

The graduating Class of 2003 was the first to meet an MCAS 
Graduation Requirement. All of the students in the Class of 
2003 who took the MCAS were successful in earning a passing 
grade. All members of the Class of 2004 have passed the 
requirement and ther efore qualify for graduation. The 
percentage of students scoring at the Proficient and 
Advanced levels is over 80% in both Mathematics and English 



146 



Language Arts. A remarkable 89% of the Class of 2003 went 
on to either a two or four year college. 

Our athletic program experienced great success in the 2002 - 

2003 school year. The Boys' Soccer Team advanced to the 
Division 3 Eastern Mass. Finals. The Boys' Lacrosse Team 
defeated Martha's Vineyard to win their first State Title. 
The Football team played against A mesbury to open their new 
home multi -purpose stadium. This past fall, boys' and 
girls' soccer, field hockey and football played home games 
on our new stadium field. The new tennis courts are now 
ready for our teams for this upcoming spring season. 




The new track facility was used for many 
successful Cape Ann League meets during the spring. 

The Ipswich Middle/High School complex is now fully 
completed. This facility and surrounding fields are a 
tribute to a commitment to the youth of Ipswich. Our award 
winning Jazz Band and Choral groups proudly perform in the 
Performing Arts Center. This program is among the most 
successful in the state. 

Despite a very difficult budget year, we have maintained a 
full and challenging program for the students of Ipswich 
High School. Fundraising donations have made the difference 
this year allowing for the purchase of textbooks, a piano, 
and substantial assistance with our athletic program. 
Thanks to all who have been so generous! 



147 



*•*■•*••*•**•*■•*• 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in 
my ninth year as principal of this dynamic and exciting 
school . We are now in the fourth year in our new building 
enjoying the warm learning environment we have created here 
together. The school design has allowed us to get to know 
our students very quickly, and each grade has developed its 
own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The 
facility has allowed students and teachers to access state 
of the art technology as well as world-class art, music, 
and drama programs. Our students continue to learn "new 
basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are 
truly important in today's world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the 
added mandated testing we now administer in all grades. 
Test results we received validated the good work being done 
in our classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is 
completed every spring, and Ipswich continues to do well. 
The Boston Globe featured our school this year due to our 
success with the teaching and testing of math. The time we 
have spent teaching them to think and write is paying off. 

We are now in our seventh year of providing a no cost after 
school program for all interested students and their 
families. This program is now part of a three-tiered grant 
with the YMCA and the Ipswich Police Department. Students 
may remain after school and receive help with homework and 
then go to the "Y" and take part in a variety of activities 
for the remainder of the afternoon. Activities have 
included swimming, fitness, cooking, nutrition, dance, 
sports and leadership. This year we were able to add a 
component where students attended six-week courses taught 
by the Trustees that took place at Crane Beach. 

Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all-important 
whole child. Each grade level specializes in exploratory 
and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning 
experiences and opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle 
School, we work in a "team" approach. Teaching blocks are 
longer for in-depth learning, technology is readily 
available, and class size is limited for maximum skill 
building. It is a cooperative venture. 



148 



Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether 
it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful courtyard complete 
with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by our 
tiger mascot — there is something for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in grade six spend an intensive and focused week 
in the spring at an environmental camp, Ferry Beach in 
Saco, Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form 
close bonds with the students. The outdoor marine 
curriculum is high interest, and many new friends and 
relationships are forged. 

Grade seven students spend four days in canoes on the 
Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river begins 
and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and 
marsh, collecting data all the way. They finish their trip 
paddling from the town wharf to arrive at Hog Island. 

Grade eight students spend four days in early June in the 
Adirondacks in upper state New York. A science focus helps 
prepare them for visits to chasms and caves as well as the 
beautiful setting of Fort Ticonderoga and the impressive 
Olympic Training Facility in Lake Placid. It is a 
wonderful culminating experience for them as they leave 
Middle School . 

We offer many enriching programs to meet the interests of 
all types of children. Our excellent Math League ranks 
very high in competition. Our drama, dance and music 
departments involve more than half of our student 
population. Student athletes participate in sports 
programs that teach skills, sportsmanship and wellness. At 
the peak of intramural basketball season, more than 2 50 
students are involved. We teach a course called "People 
Smarts" which focuses on interpersonal skills and multiple 
intelligences. A monthly "service" component has taken the 
form of food pantry and coat drives. We also participate 
in the annual "Walk for Hunger" where together we walk an 
8 -mile circuit around Great Neck and back to raise funds 
for the homeless shelters on the North Shore. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting 
learning environment . Our outstanding professional faculty 
works diligently to clarify our vision for education — that 
every child can learn. We are constantly finding new ways 
to reach and teach all children who come to our school — 



149 



they are after all, the future of Ipswich. It is an 
exciting time to be working with young people. We love our 
work and invite you to join us. 




Inside this welcoming Tiger mascot suit is 

Grade Six Student Jesse Bolles 

Photo by Ginger Eaton 



******** 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

This year continued to be a watershed experience for 
learning at the Winthrop School. Our literacy initiative 
grew with students' reading and writing skills becoming 
more proficient. There was an infectious enthusiasm for 
learning in a dynamic and energizing school community where 
students, staff, and parents became leaders, embraced 
change, and found opportunities to shape the future. 

Our School Improvement Plan, written by our School Council, 
included the following goals: 

Excelling at Literacy : An aggressive plan articulating 
a school-wide literacy curriculum for students to continue 
developing writing and reading proficiency 

Expanding Respect and Responsibility : The school -wide 
expectation to be responsible for yourself and respectful 
of others throughout the school 



150 



Annual school -wide topics have unified the school around 
the study of a common theme. This year our theme was 
"WORK" where the following questions were explored. How 
will you do your best work this year? How will you 
demonstrate how something works? What do people find 
satisfying about their work? Students and teachers met 
several challenges throughout the year with variety, 
creativity, and problem solving skills producing 
fascinating results. 

This was a difficult budget year for us. The past two years 
of financial constraints eroded our b udget possibilities to 
such an extent that they negatively impacted the 
educational opportunities available for our students. We 
lost: the Librarian, a Class Size Reduction Grant Teacher, 
a .5 Speech and Language Assistant, a .5 Custodian, the 
Extended Lea rning Program, all before and after -school 
programs, 50% of summer academic programs, all technology, 
and reductions in subject area budgets, equipment, 
supplies, software, library and classroom books, building 
improvement projects, etc. 

The major contributions of: The Friends of Ipswich 
Elementary Schools (FRIES) and the Volunteers In School 
(VIS) program helped to fund special assemblies with 
outstanding cultural and educational programs and some of 
our playground needs. The FRIES also supported requests 
from teachers for technology and library books. The VIS 
program provided hundreds of volunteers to our school . 
Senior citizens to high school students involved in 
community service projects assisted students with 
substantial learning experiences. We are grateful to all 
our "Friends" for their relentless commitment and 
outpouring of energy. 

Ipswich Citizens for Education (ICE) funded all of our 
after school programs and enabled Homework Club, Student 
Leadership Council, Art Club and Destination Imagination to 
continue servicing approximately 150 students. 
Individual family donations allowed us to fund field trips, 
increase library books, and provide classroom reading 
books, etc. 

We are a 500-student elementary school located downtown 
with many unpredictable issues which surface every year 
regarding the health, safety, and welfare of our students. 
There have been many occasions when the Fire and Police 
Departments as well as the Department of Public Works 



151 



assisted us with emergencies and unforeseen dilemmas. We 
wish to thank all Town departments who worked so closely 
with us and ensured the safety of Winthrop students and 
their families. 

We are grateful for the support and ongoing partnership 
that we receive from the Town of Ipswich and invite you to 
visit our school where you will observe students engaged in 
learning who are respectful and responsible, and who are 
experiencing a quality education in a vibrant learning 
community. We are proud of our students' accomplishments 
and the staff who provide outstanding learning experiences 
for them. Please come and see us. We will put you to good 
work that will satisfy and fulfill your lives. They do 
ours . 




********* 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

This was an exciting year for education at the Doyon 
School . The adventure of preparing youth for an-ever- 
evolving future continues to be a challenging one, 
requiring our best efforts and energies, especially 
in times when resources are tight. This past year 
the Doyon Team did an exemplary job in meeting these 
challenges and in implementing a high quality, 
creative and stimulating educational program. 

Our vision statement, "Preparing for Life Through 
Learning, " underscores the importance we associate 



152 



with relevancy: prior to lessons and activities, we 
ask ourselves, "when will our students actually 
utilize that which we are teaching." Our efforts in 
terms of academics this past year were highlighted by 
new initiatives in the area of Literacy. We were 
especially interested in continuing to strengthen our 
programs in reading and writing. To this end, we 
formed a Reading Comprehension Study Group made up of 
four teachers from each elementary school which met 
throughout this past year and which will soon be 
making recommendations for improvement. All Doyon 
primary grade teachers attended a wonderful workshop 
with Lucy Calkins, which presented a vision for a new 
approach to writing and composition in the primary 
grades. We were again able to offer in-house Project 
Read phonology training to all instructional 
personnel who had not previously had the training, 
and we are moving forward with pilot programs in 
spelling as well as in use of new phonemic and 
comprehension assessments. We were also, thanks to 
funding from the Friends of Ipswich Elementary 
School, able to make a substantial investment in the 
breath and scope of reading resources available in 
classroom libraries. Our second annual "Writers 
Week, " was a great success, with multiple visits from 
professional and amateur writers and poets . Just a 
quick note on test scores: approximately 90% of our 
students passed all subjects in all grades, and we 
were invited by the Department of Education to apply 
for the "Compass School" recognition. 




Dandelion Study in the Doyon School Courtyard 

Photo by Susan Abruzzi 



153 



This past year we continued our character development 
initiative; and the Character Counts team, working 
with consultants in the area of "Emotional 
Intelligence, " did extensive research into a variety 
of approaches to encourage students to build the 
habit of impulse control. We had a schoolwide 
S.T.O.P assembly (Stop, Think, Options, Proceed) and 
all families received a refrigerator magnet with the 
program's logo and key points. We continue with our 
implementation of the Responsive Classroom approach, 
and new classroom teachers received training in this 
program. 

We continue to be grateful for the assistance of a 
number of groups whose fundraising efforts have 
surely been important in this time of fiscal belt- 
tightening. The Friends of Ipswich Elementary School 
raised more than $30,000 and sponsored a wide variety 
of academic programs and activities for all grade 
levels throughout the year, including providing a new 
playground area and donating money for library books. 
The FRIES were also active volunteers in classrooms, 
the library, and during special events and projects 
including school picture day, kindergarten screening, 
the "Understanding Our Differences program, " and 
writers week. The Ipswich Citizens for Education 
helped us to fund the Student Leadership Team (more 
than 90 members!) and also supported our literacy 
program. The Golf Tournament was crucial to our 
being able to acquire important science instructional 
equipment and materials, provide professional 
development for staff in the area of science, and 
provide extra instructional support in mathematics. 
The Mobile Corporation for the fourth year in a row 
provided a substantial grant which this year was used 
for new assessment materials. In sum, our school, 
the Doyon staff, and the children of Ipswich, were 
the beneficiaries last year of more than $50,000 in 
supplemental funding and hundreds, (if not thousands 
) of hours of volunteer time. To all of these 
groups, and to all of the folks who contributed, when 
we say, "We could not do this without you, " we mean 
it. 



54 




Student Evan Brown is using an auger to collect 
soil samples for a class science project. 

Photo by Susan Abruzzi 

On this, the occasion of my seventeenth annual 
report, I would like to extend a special thanks to 
the incredibly dedicated and talented faculty and 
staff of the Doyon School with whom it is a pleasure 
to work, and to the students of the Doyon School who 
invariably greet each day with a "Good Morning, " and 
a smile that helps to keep the rest of us young-at- 
heart . 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

Diana W. Minton, Director 

Another year has gone by for Special Education with little 
change in our successful programming and model for delivery 
of services. This past year, however, we did establish a 
skills classroom at the Ipswich Middle School to respond to 
the unique needs of some of our special students. It has 
been a great success . 

In all the schools we continue the implementation of a 
program manager model for directing all aspects of the 
federal and state mandates for a free and appropriate 
education for all children with disabilities. This model 
fulfills the requirement of some level of alternative 
education for all students who demonstrate an inability to 
learn in the traditional classroom. 



155 



With a strong support system of special education teachers 
and therapists, our learning disabled students, without 
exception, were able to pass the MCAS testing for 
graduation. Only a very few students across the district, 
with more serious disabilities, were given the alternative 
testing and would not be eligible for a diploma. 

We look forward to a year of self -evaluation and program 
review by the Massachusetts Department of Education in 
2005. 

******** 

IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Edgar Turner, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority completed the development on 
Essex Road in June 2003. The Group Home was built for 
people with special needs and is occupied by four (4) 
residents of the Department of Mental Health. 

The Authority held an Open House on June 26, 2003, at 11:00 
a.m. The dedication was attended by a number of local and 
State officials, including Town Manager George Howe and the 
Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD) 
representative Ray Friedan. 

The Authority has filed a bill to name the house the 
Raymond M. Daniels House after the former Executive 
Director of the Ipswich Housing Authority. Ray was the 
mastermind behind this project and the projects surrounding 
the house . 




156 



******** 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Dorothy Laurence, Chair 

Massachusetts Cultural Council allocated Ipswich Cultural $2,000 
for grants to be awarded to organizations and individual artists 
supporting cultural activities that benefit our town. Seven of 
the twelve applicants who applied were successful, representing 
a variety of fields including visual arts, music, interpretive 
science, literature and dance. Funding was consistent with the 
community priority of community wide gatherings as determined by 
results of a recent Ipswich Cultural Council Community Input 
Survey. A Public Web Page is available for complete grant 
information at www. mass -culture . org/ lee public . asp . 

The Seventeenth Annual Art Show, held at EBSCO Publishing 
and chaired by Miranda Updike represented a wide variety of 
visual art forms and included a Poetry Reading and 
Interpretive Dance Performance. 

ICC meetings at Town Hall are open to the public. New 
members are welcome. 



******** 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Glenn Hazelton, Chair 

In 2003, the Open Space Committee continued to focus on 
evaluating parcels that could be acquired using the Open 
Space Bond funds. In addition to working with the fund 
manger, we have been refining and revising the procedure 
used to evaluate the parcels identified as of conservation 
interest. This procedure helps the committee identify 
important features and rank the parcels so the Selectmen 
have a basis on which to authorize the expenditure of bond 
funds . 

The management of Town-owned open space has been listed as 
an issue in our Open Space and Recreation Plan for many 
years. This year we have been working with the Planning 
Department to determine the current level of protection and 
the responsible departments. Whenever appropriate we have 
suggested changes. The next step in our process is to work 
with designated departments to establish plans for the 



157 



management of each Town-owned parcel, perhaps through a 
system of volunteer monitors . 

Another action item in the Open Space Plan, which is up for 
revision this year, is regional communication and 
cooperation. We have had a number of visitors at our 
monthly meetings from other communities and non-profits. 
This has reinforced our belief that open space is not 
defined by town boundaries, but rather by a mutual regional 
concern for the character of the landscape and its impact 
on the quality of life in all of our North Shore 
communities . 

A big setback in 2003 was the resignation of our Open Space 
Bond Program Manager, Tracie Hines, who moved on to another 
career. Tracie was responsible for virtually all of the 
successful acquisitions or conservation restrictions that 
have been achieved under the bond; she was often able to 
leverage the bond funds to acquire additional funds from 
state, federal, corporate, or non-profit sources so as to 
greatly increase the amount of money available for land 
protection. Her skill and her presence are greatly missed. 
As of this writing, the Town is in the process of filling 
her position. 

HALL -HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens/Stephanie Gaskins 
Co-Chairs 

The year 2003 was another good year for the Hall-Haskell 
House. The Visitor Center was open from May 1st to October 
31st this year. Tourism continues to prosper with more 
than 6,000 people stopping by to make inquiries about the 
area, the town and the beach. 

Thanks to Bill Nelson's superb managerial skills and to 
Louise Ciolek, Volunteer Coordinator, they are able to find 
volunteers to make a commitment to keep the Center open 
seven days a week. We thank them all for their efforts. 
They offer a great service to the community and enjoy each 
other's camaraderie. Volunteers donate many individual 
hours to make running of the Visitor Center successful, and 
we appreciate their dedication and spirit. 



158 



This year the Tourism Committee held a very successful 
house tour. Despite the weather, there was a fabulous turn 
out and many houses of interest to visit. This is a 
monumental tasks involving paying attention to detail and 
lots of coordination. We thank the Tourism Committee, 
those who willingly opened their houses for the tour, and 
all the volunteers who manned the rooms answering 
questions. It couldn't have happen without everyone's 
help. Thank you all for a successful tour. Monies raised 
will be used to publish a new tourism brochure. 

Artists continue to be interested in using the gallery 
space to display their work. This year more than fifty- 
five artists displayed their work during the twenty-eight 
weeks that the gallery was open. This is more than half 
the year that the gallery is accessible to both visitors 
and artists, which is a wonderful indicator of its 
success. Photography, jewelry, weaving, sculpture, 
watercolor and oil painting, floor cloths and painted and 
decorated furniture were among the various types of art 
forms represented. It was a wonderful year. 

At present, eight weeks have already been booked for the 
following year. We continue to be impressed with the 
quality of work represented in the gallery and pleased with 
the success of the uses for this structure. 

Thanks to all members of our committee, staff and 
volunteers of the Visitor Center, the Tourism Committee, 
Town Manager George Howe, Selectmen and the public for your 
support this year and throughout the years. We appreciate 
the collective efforts of all. 



*■*■*■***•** 



BAY CIRCUIT TRAIL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Eliot, Chair 

This year the Committee has worked on the portion of the 
Bay Circuit Trail that goes along the southern edge of the 
Country Club through Conservation land and Marini ' s farm to 
Willowdale State Forest. The Bay Circuit Committee, 
Conservation Commission and the Essex County Trail 
Association reached an agreement with Marini this fall. The 
Committee is now working with ECTA and the Conservation 
Commission on the construction of this part of the trail. 



159 



Preparations for a new Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and 
Around Ipswich are complete. The new Guide will include: 
digital maps, new sketches of the flora through a grant 
from the Ipswich Arts Council, and text revisions as 
needed. We are looking for a late winter publication. 

Guided trail hikes have continued to be organized, 
advertised in the Chronicle and led by members of the 
Committee. This informal walking/hiking groups meets at 
Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. to 
explore local trails. 

*********** 

WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Kenneth R. Spellman, Chair 

The year 2003 found the Waterways Committee meeting several 
times, and the number one agenda item continues to be 
access for an increased number of boaters in Ipswich 
waters . 

As the number of mooring spaces becomes more limited 
because of silting action, several meetings were held with 
the State Public Access Board, The Army Corps of Engineers, 
and the administration from Public Safety to discuss 
possible dredging of the River. Input has also been 
solicited from the Shellfish Board, the commercial boating 
industry, as well as representatives from the conservation 
interests in Town. The process takes several years and 
continues to be a major item to be studied. 

Improvements for the public wharf have also been discussed, 
and, hopefully, budget requests will produce some results. 

The Committee will continue to hold regular meetings and 
highly encourage the public to attend and bring their 
waterways concerns for discussion. 



160 



•*•*•*•*••*•■*•** 



TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Robert K. Weatherall , Chair 
Edward Michon, Vice Chair 
Jean Emerson, Secretary 

By statute and by vote of Town Meeting, the Commission has 
responsibility for managing all funds given or bequeathed 
to the Twon for the benefit of the Town, other than funds 
under the management of the Cemeteries and Parks 
Commission. Also by statute the Commission has charge over 
the municipal insurance fund. The sums held in these funds 
as of June 30, 2003, may be found in the financial tables 
that follow headed "Expendable Trust Funds" and "Non- 
Expendable Trust Funds". The dollar amounts in the non- 
expendable table show the amounts donors have given or 
bequeathed to generate an income for activities they wished 
to support; for example, providing scholarship assistance 
to needy students. The amounts in the expendable table show 
the accumulated income available to be spent in accordance 
with the or the last many years, the funds have been 
invested in Franklin Templeton' s Short-Intermediate U.S. 
Government Bond Fund. The fund is invested primarily in 
government -backed mortgages, but also in U.S. Treasury 
bonds and has given the Town a satisfactory return. The 
return on all the funds in the two table taken together has 
been as follows since fiscal year 1998: 

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 
6.2% 3.8% 3.2% 8.4% 6.6% 5.8% 

Most of the return comes from interest on the mortgages and 
bonds, but there is also the possibility of capital gain 
(or loss) as the instruments gain (or lose) value in the 
market. In 2001, a considerable portion of the return came 
from a gain in the capital value. In 1999, a loss in value 
reduced the total return. 

The Town' s practice has been to treat all of the returns as 
interest and not to use a portion to grow the trust fund 
assets shown in the non- expendable table. Failure to do so 
leaves them exposed to the effects of price inflation. 
Take, for example, the income from the $10 0,000 which the 
late Carl A. Pescosolido gave in 1994 to help send a 
student to college. It is in a losing race with college 
costs. Go back further to the Mark Newman fund given in 



161 



1944 to support woodworking in the high school. It has 
lost 90 percent of its buying power. 

We believe the trust funds shown on the non- expendable list 
need to be invested for growth of capital as well as income 
just as college and university endowments are. The illness 
of the Town Treasurer during the first part of the year and 
her resignation in the fall led us to defer consideration 
of the matter; but we intend to pursue it and make a 
proposal to the Town authorities. 

Under the terms of the donor, the Commission chooses the 
students to receive scholarship assistance from the 
Cornelius Thibeault Fund. The Commission awarded $1,000 to 
James Cornacchio to support his studies at Carnegie Mellon 
University and $1,500 to Amanda Pike to support hers at 
Mount Ida College. 

******** 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of 
the "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990" as published 
in the Federal Register on July 26, 1991. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the public, 
employees, and job applicants that no qualified individual 
with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be 
excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of 
the services, programs, activities, or employment 
opportunities in the Town of Ipswich, or be subjected to 
discrimination by the Town. A "qualified individual with a 
disability" means an individual with a disability who, with 
or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or 
practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or 
transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids 
and services, meets the essential eligibility requirements 
for the receipt of services, the participation in programs 
or activities, and access to job opportunities in the Town. 



162 



The Town of Ipswich has designated the following 
(person or office) as the contact to coordinate 
efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries 
should be directed to: 

Name: Colleen E. Fermon 

Office: ADA Coordinator, Health Office 

Address: Town Hall, 25 Green Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 
Phone Number: (978)356-6605 
Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs 



00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



********* 



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189 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENT OF FUNDS ACTIVITY 

July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003 



Operating Funds 

Beginning Balance 
Interest/Dividends 
Donations, Bequests, Grants 
Books, Publications Purchased 
Building & Grounds, Misc. Costs 
Children's activities 
English Second Language 
Ending Balance 



$ 74,118.05 

$ 20,289.46 

$ 9,447.90 

$ (9,654.36) 

$ (149.85) 

$ (6,346.32) 

$ (1,000.00) 

$ 86,704.88 



Restricted Funds 

Ipswich Speaks Fund 

Beginning Balance 
Interest Income 
TXFR to Operating Funds 
Ending Balance 



1,332.46 
18.93 
(1,351.39) 



Markos Fund for Hellenic Culture 

Beginning Balance 
Interest Income 
TXFR to Operating Funds 
Ending Balance 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


2,854.13 
120.38 
(120.38) 
2,854.13 


Fidelity Mutual Fund 

Beginning Balance 
Interest Income 
Ending Balance 


$ 
$ 

$ 


3,361.07 

58.52 

3,419.59 


Library Trust Fund 

Beginning Balance 
Interest Income 
Int. TXFR to Operating Funds 
Ending Balance 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


55,602.13 
1,543.31 
(418.17) 

56,727.27 


Helen St John Fund 

Beginning Balance 
Interest Income 
TXFR to Operating Funds 
Ending Balance 


$ 383,592.42 
$ 18,378.25 
$ (17,970.67) 
$ 384,000.00 



190 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on hand January 1,2003 $42,433.44 

Income from funds for year 2003 as follows: 
Interest: Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Term Deposit Certificates $2,022.59 

Expenditures for the year 2003 as follows: 

Doyon School Literacy Program $2,500.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 2004 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Term Deposit Certificates $41,956.03. 



Respectfully submitted 
Burley Education Fund 



V. James DiFazio 
Treasurer 



191 



:Tp 









IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 












3 2122 00166 130 9 



THE TOWN OF IPSWICH AT YOUR 
SERVICE 
A handy Check-List of Often-Used 
Town Services: 

Administration 

Town Manager 356-6609 

Accounting 

Finance Director 356-6601 

Ambulance 

Business 356-9800 

Emergency 911 

Assessments 

Assessors 356-6603 

Building & Health 

Building Inspector 356-6605 

Code Enforcement 356-6605 

Gas Inspector 356-0523 

Health Agent 356-6606 

Plumbing Inspector 356-0523 

Business Association 356-4400 

Cemetery & Parks 

Office 356-6643 

Civil Defense 

Emergency Management ... 356-6645 

Council on Aging 356-6650 

Court 

Third District Court ... 356-2681 
Probation 356-0333 

Crane Beach 

Gate 356-4354 

Castle Hill. 356-4351 

Dog Officer 

Dog Pound 356-6652 

Animal Control Of ficer. 356-4343 

Electric Department 

Office 356-6635 

Fire Department 

Business 356-4321 

Emergency 911 

Fire Prevention 356-6631 

Harbormaster 356-4343 

Historical Society 

Curator - Whipple 356-2811 

Curator - Heard 356-2641 



Housing Authority 

Office 356 

Ipswich Chronicle. .. 356 

Library 356 

Mosquito Control .... 474 

Parking Clerk 356 

Planning & Development 

Town Planner 356 

Planning Board.... 356 

Conservation 356 

Police Department 

Business 356 

Emergency 911 

Shellfish 356 

Public Works Department 

Office 356 

Recycling 356 

Trash Collection. . 356 
Purchasing Off ice... 356 
Recreation Department 

Office 356 

Registry of Motor. 800-8 
School Department 

Administration. . . .356 

High School 356 

Middle School 356 

Winthrop School... 356 

Doyon School 356 

Selectmen 

Office 356 

Town Clerk 

Office 356 

General Licenses . .356 
Treasurer /Col lector 

Office 356 

Veterans Services 

Veterans Agent.... 356 
Water Department 

Office 356 

Water Treatment 356 

Visitors Center 356 



-2860 

-5141 
-6648 
-4640 
-6611 

-6607 
-6607 
-6661 

-4343 

-4343 

-6612 
-6612 
-6612 
-6608 

-6644 
58-3926 

-2935 
-3137 
-3535 
-2976 
-5506 

-6604 

-6600 
-6600 

-6610 

-3915 

-6637 
-6639 
-8540